America Compared Conquering and Settling the West Rebecca Thomas
American and Canadian Conflicts with Indigenous People <ul><li>Both the United States and Canada were faced with the issue...
Notable Facts Concerning the Conquering and Settling of the West <ul><li>Met ί s in Manitoba, Canada:  When the Canadian g...
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Conqandsett

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Conqandsett

  1. 1. America Compared Conquering and Settling the West Rebecca Thomas
  2. 2. American and Canadian Conflicts with Indigenous People <ul><li>Both the United States and Canada were faced with the issue of a culture clash with the Native American tribes when attempting to move their modernization westward. Along with this issue there was also the challenge of dealing with social reactions to a new race (one of both white and native blood). While both nations faced the same issues, the two governments dealt with them in very different ways. In the United States, the conflict was much more violent; incorporating bloody battles between native tribes and civil war soldiers; and there was more of a vendetta for annexing the cultural and religious practices of the native people. In Canada, the government acknowledged the mixed-race people as a distinct racial group (with their own language and culture) which allowed for a more peaceful association with the national government; also, the Canadian soldiers weren’t so focused on destroying the native culture as they were focused on establishing a national government. However, both nations encouraged the inbreeding of white culture into the lives on Native Americans (the United States was just more forceful in doing so). </li></ul>
  3. 3. Notable Facts Concerning the Conquering and Settling of the West <ul><li>Met ί s in Manitoba, Canada: When the Canadian government moved westward it ran into a small conflict in a place now known as Manitoba. At the time Canada had 4 provinces. When government officials began establishing landholding patterns in accordance to those in Ontario it angered the local Met ί s(mixed-race people of French and Native descent) who had no say in the decisions. The Met ί s banned together under Louis Riel Jr. (a Montreal educated Met ί s). Because the Canadian government acknowledges the Met ί s as a distinct people with distinct rights (different from both white and Indian rights) it was more lenient than the United States might have been in allowing Manitoba to establish itself as its own province with its own government. In December 1869, Riel proclaimed that Manitoba had its own provisional government and the next year it joined the Canadian Confederation as a province, if only a small one. </li></ul><ul><li>Indian Assimilation into American White Culture: The United States government used land as a leverage tool in encouraging the Native population to assimilate into the white culture. In order for an Indian individual to acquire land they had to pass a series of “tests”. First of all, they had to be able to speak, read, and write in English. Then they had to show some merit of how they are a “good person”. The United States even forced many young Native Americans to attend a boarding school in which they would be taught white culture and even Christianity. </li></ul><ul><li>Wounded Knee: The bloody battle at Wounded Knee marked the end of violent conflict between the American government and the Native American people. Wounded Knee was a result of the Native Americans revolting against the bans on their religious practices; specifically, their traditional “ghost dance”. The U.S. Army massacred Indian women, children, and men at Wounded Knee, and the shockingly bloody ambush broke the back of Indian resistance. </li></ul>Image of Wounded Knee

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