Best Practices for Building a Warehouse Quickly

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Key factors that influence a successful data warehouse task are:

+ Implementing the True Development Approach
+ Choosing a Rapid Development Product
+ Ensuring Data Availability
+ Involving Key Users throughout the whole project
+ Relying on a Pragmatic Governance Framework
+ Utilizing experienced Team Members
+ Selecting the right Hardware, Infrastructure Technology

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Best Practices for Building a Warehouse Quickly

  1. 1. Best Practices Building a Data Warehouse Quickly October 16, 2009 | Florida Chapter Presented by Raphael Klebanov, WhereScape USA Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide # Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software
  2. 2. <ul><li>Key factors that influence a successful data warehouse task </li></ul><ul><li>Implementing the True Development Approach </li></ul><ul><li>Choosing a Rapid Development Product </li></ul><ul><li>Ensuring Data Availability </li></ul><ul><li>Involving Key Users throughout the whole project </li></ul><ul><li>Relying on a Pragmatic Governance Framework </li></ul><ul><li>Utilizing experienced Team Members </li></ul><ul><li>Selecting the right Hardware , Infrastructure Technology </li></ul>Abstract Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  3. 3. Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide # Basic Architecture of a Data Warehouse
  4. 4. <ul><li>… for a intelligent decision-making process? </li></ul><ul><li>… for data warehouse? </li></ul>Are you ready … Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  5. 5. Why do Data Warehouse projects fail? Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  6. 6. <ul><li>Unreliable or unattainable user requirements </li></ul>Why do Data Warehouse projects fail? Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  7. 7. <ul><li>Unreliable or unattainable user requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Quality of the data that feeds the source system </li></ul>Why do Data Warehouse projects fail? Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  8. 8. <ul><li>Unreliable or unattainable user requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Quality of the data that feeds the source system </li></ul><ul><li>Changing source or target requirements </li></ul>Why do Data Warehouse projects fail? Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  9. 9. <ul><li>Unreliable or unattainable user requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Quality of the data that feeds the source system </li></ul><ul><li>Changing source or target requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Poor development productivity </li></ul>Why do Data Warehouse projects fail? Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  10. 10. <ul><li>Unreliable or unattainable user requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Quality of the data that feeds the source system </li></ul><ul><li>Changing source or target requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Poor development productivity </li></ul><ul><li>High TCO (Total Cost of Ownership </li></ul>Why do Data Warehouse projects fail? Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  11. 11. <ul><li>Unreliable or unattainable user requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Quality of the data that feeds the source system </li></ul><ul><li>Changing source or target requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Poor development productivity </li></ul><ul><li>High TCO (Total Cost of Ownership) </li></ul><ul><li>Poor documentation </li></ul>Why do Data Warehouse projects fail? Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  12. 12. <ul><li>Unreliable or unattainable user requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Quality of the data that feeds the source system </li></ul><ul><li>Changing source or target requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Poor development productivity </li></ul><ul><li>High TCO (Total Cost of Ownership) </li></ul><ul><li>Poor documentation </li></ul><ul><li>“… over 50% of data warehouse projects fail or go wildly over budget – they blame data quality…” The real problem is project approach. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: Gartner. Magic Quadrant for Data Integration Tools, 2007 </li></ul>Why do Data Warehouse projects fail? Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  13. 13. DW Project Components Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  14. 14. <ul><li>Strong sponsorship of the DW from the business </li></ul>DW Project Components Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  15. 15. <ul><li>Strong sponsorship of the DW from the business </li></ul><ul><li>Divide and Conquer approach </li></ul>DW Project Components Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  16. 16. <ul><li>Strong sponsorship of the DW from the business </li></ul><ul><li>Divide and Conquer approach </li></ul><ul><li>Iterative Development approach </li></ul>DW Project Components Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  17. 17. <ul><li>Strong sponsorship of the DW from the business </li></ul><ul><li>Divide and Conquer approach </li></ul><ul><li>Iterative Development approach </li></ul><ul><li>Productive development tools </li></ul>DW Project Components Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  18. 18. <ul><li>Strong sponsorship of the DW from the business </li></ul><ul><li>Divide and Conquer approach </li></ul><ul><li>Iterative Development approach </li></ul><ul><li>Productive development tools </li></ul><ul><li>Real data to populate the prototype </li></ul>DW Project Components Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  19. 19. <ul><li>Strong sponsorship of the DW from the business </li></ul><ul><li>Divide and Conquer approach </li></ul><ul><li>Iterative Development approach </li></ul><ul><li>Productive development tools </li></ul><ul><li>Real data to populate the prototype </li></ul><ul><li>Access to SME during development </li></ul>DW Project Components Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  20. 20. <ul><li>Strong sponsorship of the DW from the business </li></ul><ul><li>Divide and Conquer approach </li></ul><ul><li>Iterative Development approach </li></ul><ul><li>Productive development tools </li></ul><ul><li>Real data to populate the prototype </li></ul><ul><li>Access to SME during development </li></ul><ul><li>Compact teams </li></ul>DW Project Components Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  21. 21. <ul><li>Strong sponsorship of the DW from the business </li></ul><ul><li>Divide and Conquer approach </li></ul><ul><li>Iterative Development approach </li></ul><ul><li>Productive development tools </li></ul><ul><li>Real data to populate the prototype </li></ul><ul><li>Access to SME during development </li></ul><ul><li>Compact teams </li></ul><ul><li>Sturdy development hardware </li></ul>DW Project Components Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  22. 22. Business Ownership Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  23. 23. <ul><li>The data warehouse should be owned by the business – not IT </li></ul>Business Ownership Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  24. 24. <ul><li>The data warehouse should be owned by the business – not IT </li></ul><ul><li>A successful project depends upon creating a partnership with the business </li></ul>Business Ownership Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  25. 25. <ul><li>The data warehouse should be owned by the business – not IT </li></ul><ul><li>A successful project depends upon creating a partnership with the business </li></ul><ul><li>Prioritization of project phases or agreement on a data dictionary should be agreed by the business </li></ul>Business Ownership Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  26. 26. <ul><li>The data warehouse should be owned by the business – not IT </li></ul><ul><li>A successful project depends upon creating a partnership with the business </li></ul><ul><li>Prioritization of project phases or agreement on a data dictionary should be agreed by the business </li></ul><ul><li>Without a strong, high level business sponsor(s) the project is likely to hit problems </li></ul>Business Ownership Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  27. 27. <ul><li>The data warehouse should be owned by the business – not IT </li></ul><ul><li>A successful project depends upon creating a partnership with the business </li></ul><ul><li>prioritization of project phases or agreement on a data dictionary to should be agreed by the business </li></ul><ul><li>Without a strong, high level business sponsor(s) the project is likely to hit problems </li></ul><ul><li>If sponsorship is present then the data warehouse project can be broken down into a set of smaller projects </li></ul>Business Ownership Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  28. 28. The Data Warehouse lifecycle …as we know it
  29. 29. Divide and Conquer Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  30. 30. <ul><li>A ‘ big bang ’ approach to data warehousing has almost always ended in disaster </li></ul>Divide and Conquer Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  31. 31. <ul><li>A ‘ big bang ’ approach to data warehousing has almost always ended in disaster </li></ul><ul><li>The project phases and the order in which they are developed should be decided by the data warehouse sponsors </li></ul>Divide and Conquer Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  32. 32. <ul><li>A ‘ big bang ’ approach to data warehousing has almost always ended in disaster </li></ul><ul><li>The project phases and the order in which they are developed should be decided by the data warehouse sponsors </li></ul><ul><li>Momentum is paramount for keeping the required focus </li></ul>Divide and Conquer Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  33. 33. <ul><li>A ‘ big bang ’ approach to data warehousing has almost always ended in disaster </li></ul><ul><li>The project phases and the order in which they are developed should be decided by the data warehouse sponsors </li></ul><ul><li>Momentum is paramount for keeping the required focus </li></ul><ul><li>Rapid prototyping and tight development cycles are vital for successful warehouse </li></ul>Divide and Conquer Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  34. 34. <ul><li>A ‘ big bang ’ approach to data warehousing has almost always ended in disaster </li></ul><ul><li>The project phases and the order in which they are developed should be decided by the data warehouse sponsors </li></ul><ul><li>Momentum is paramount for keeping the required focus </li></ul><ul><li>Rapid prototyping and tight development cycles are vital for successful warehouse </li></ul><ul><li>Keep in view the bigger picture </li></ul>Divide and Conquer Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  35. 35. <ul><li>A ‘ big bang ’ approach to data warehousing has almost always ended in disaster </li></ul><ul><li>The project phases and the order in which they are developed should be decided by the data warehouse sponsors </li></ul><ul><li>Momentum is paramount for keeping the required focus </li></ul><ul><li>Rapid prototyping and tight development cycles are vital for successful warehouse </li></ul><ul><li>Keep in view the bigger picture </li></ul><ul><li>Use smaller phases to fund the project adequately </li></ul>Divide and Conquer Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  36. 36. The True Project Approach Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  37. 37. <ul><li>Getting the business reps to use working prototypes to share an understanding of the scope </li></ul>The True Project Approach Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  38. 38. <ul><li>Getting the business reps to use working prototypes to share an understanding of the scope </li></ul><ul><li>Collect detailed user requirements is exactly the wrong start to a data warehouse project </li></ul>The True Project Approach Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  39. 39. <ul><li>Getting the business reps to use working prototypes to share an understanding of the scope </li></ul><ul><li>Collect detailed user requirements is exactly the wrong start to a data warehouse project </li></ul><ul><li>Showing business users the data and relationships that are available to them in a working, populated prototype </li></ul>The True Project Approach Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  40. 40. <ul><li>Getting the business reps to use working prototypes to share an understanding of the scope </li></ul><ul><li>Collect detailed user requirements is exactly the wrong start to a data warehouse project </li></ul><ul><li>Showing business users the data and relationships that are available to them in a working, populated prototype </li></ul><ul><li>A better place to start is to collect KPIs and source system technical documentation </li></ul>The True Project Approach Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  41. 41. <ul><li>Getting the business reps to use working prototypes to share an understanding of the scope </li></ul><ul><li>Collect detailed user requirements is exactly the wrong start to a data warehouse project </li></ul><ul><li>Showing business users the data and relationships that are available to them in a working, populated prototype </li></ul><ul><li>A better place to start is to collect KPIs and source system technical documentation </li></ul><ul><li>OLAP technology and user workshops are key tools in allowing the business to get their hands on the data </li></ul>The True Project Approach Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  42. 42. <ul><li>Getting the business reps to use working prototypes to share an understanding of the scope </li></ul><ul><li>Collect detailed user requirements is exactly the wrong start to a data warehouse project </li></ul><ul><li>Showing business users the data and relationships that are available to them in a working, populated prototype </li></ul><ul><li>A better place to start is to collect KPIs and source system technical documentation </li></ul><ul><li>OLAP technology and user workshops are key tools in allowing the business to get their hands on the data </li></ul><ul><li>Data quality should not be addressed in the DW; problem should be fixed on the source system </li></ul>The True Project Approach Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  43. 43. Rapid Development Product Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  44. 44. <ul><li>Scrutinize Extract/Transform and Load (ETL) tools when considering building a DW. ETL tools do not provide the ability to build a working prototype and work in short development cycles </li></ul>Rapid Development Product and ETL Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  45. 45. <ul><li>Combining processing and design </li></ul><ul><li>Ability to enable, manage fast iterations of the prototype </li></ul><ul><li>Environment migration </li></ul><ul><li>Version control </li></ul><ul><li>Automatic documentation </li></ul>Rapid Development Product Enables: Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  46. 46. The Features of a DWLC Tool Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  47. 47. <ul><li>Single Development Interface </li></ul>The Features of a DWLC Tool Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  48. 48. <ul><li>Single Development Interface </li></ul><ul><li>Documentation </li></ul>The Features of a DWLC Tool Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  49. 49. <ul><li>Single Development Interface </li></ul><ul><li>Documentation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Table Generation </li></ul>The Features of a DWLC Tool Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  50. 50. <ul><li>Single Development Interface </li></ul><ul><li>Documentation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Table Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Code Generation </li></ul>The Features of a DWLC Tool Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  51. 51. <ul><li>Single Development Interface </li></ul><ul><li>Documentation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Table Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Code Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Metadata Migration </li></ul>The Features of a DWLC Tool Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  52. 52. <ul><li>Single Development Interface </li></ul><ul><li>Documentation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Table Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Code Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Metadata Migration </li></ul><ul><li>Version Control </li></ul>The Features of a DWLC Tool Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  53. 53. <ul><li>Single Development Interface </li></ul><ul><li>Documentation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Table Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Code Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Metadata Migration </li></ul><ul><li>Version Control </li></ul><ul><li>Object Checkout </li></ul>The Features of a DWLC Tool Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  54. 54. <ul><li>Single Development Interface </li></ul><ul><li>Documentation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Table Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Code Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Metadata Migration </li></ul><ul><li>Version Control </li></ul><ul><li>Object Checkout </li></ul><ul><li>Leverage Existing Core Skills. </li></ul>The Features of a DWLC Tool Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  55. 55. <ul><li>Single Development Interface </li></ul><ul><li>Documentation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Table Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Code Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Metadata Migration </li></ul><ul><li>Version Control </li></ul><ul><li>Object Checkout </li></ul><ul><li>Leverage Existing Core Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Consistent Framework </li></ul>The Features of a DWLC Tool Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  56. 56. <ul><li>Single Development Interface </li></ul><ul><li>Documentation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Table Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Automated Code Generation </li></ul><ul><li>Metadata Migration </li></ul><ul><li>Version Control </li></ul><ul><li>Object Checkout </li></ul><ul><li>Leverage Existing Core Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Consistent Framework </li></ul><ul><li>Extensibility </li></ul>The Features of a DWLC Tool Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  57. 57. Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide # Try to get it right first time: The SDLC approach <ul><li>But: </li></ul><ul><li>Tools and operators in silos – inflexible </li></ul><ul><li>Hard to engage business users, no shared understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Locked in requirements that can’t be met </li></ul><ul><li>Redevelopment </li></ul>120 day cycle Risky, expensive, never OTTB & never finished No documentation, so hard to support The Traditional Approach
  58. 58. Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide # Prototype and iterate to prove a design with users <ul><li>Supported by: </li></ul><ul><li>Integrated toolset and metadata repository – maximum flexibility </li></ul><ul><li>Continuous business engagement, shared understanding </li></ul><ul><li>No ambiguity or disagreement about scope </li></ul><ul><li>Successful phase completion </li></ul>Complete, OTTB, user expectations exceeded Documented solution that is easy to support The Rapid Development Approach 5 day cycle
  59. 59. <ul><li>A DWLC Tool would save a huge amount of development time and effort , and would enable the approach required to deliver a successful outcome </li></ul><ul><li>The DWLC methodology is a child concept for Agile Development Methodology also known as Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) </li></ul>The Features of a DWLC Tool Slide #
  60. 60. Ensuring Data Availability Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  61. 61. <ul><li>The lack of good quality live data will have a major impact on the success of Iterative project approach </li></ul><ul><li>The DW’s capacity to answer BI requirements is unworkable, without sufficient data to populate the DW </li></ul><ul><li>If a new source system is integrated into the data warehouse, the “real” data is quite essential </li></ul><ul><li>If no “real” data for new source is available, then the significant rework will be required once the source is up and running </li></ul>Ensuring Data Availability Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  62. 62. Involving the Business Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  63. 63. <ul><li>Representatives from the Business provide the partnership with the DW development team </li></ul><ul><li>These reps need to be able to articulate the needs of the business to the dev. team </li></ul><ul><li>These reps have to trust the business department behind them when it comes to making any decisions </li></ul><ul><li>The partnership during the iterative project approach provides a reliable, successful outcome </li></ul><ul><li>The main forum for developers to show a working prototype and get user feedback is user workshop </li></ul><ul><li>The business Involvement for the duration of the DW development will reduce the QA overheads </li></ul>Involving the Business Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  64. 64. Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide # Project governance
  65. 65. <ul><li>Governance of the data warehouse project should operate at two levels : </li></ul><ul><li>an enterprise level and </li></ul><ul><li>a project level </li></ul>Pragmatic Governance Framework Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  66. 66. <ul><li>Governance of the data warehouse project should operate at two levels : </li></ul><ul><li>an enterprise level and </li></ul><ul><li>a project level </li></ul>Pragmatic Governance Framework Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide # Business Requirements Technical Constraints
  67. 67. <ul><li>Governance of the data warehouse project should operate at two levels : </li></ul><ul><li>an enterprise level and </li></ul><ul><li>a project level </li></ul>Pragmatic Governance Framework Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide # Business Requirements Technical Constraints Shared understanding, Prototype and Iterate, Best possible outcome
  68. 68. <ul><li>Sponsorship is sourced from a highly-placed executive </li></ul><ul><li>The steering committee provides: </li></ul><ul><li>+ Vision </li></ul><ul><li>+ Visibility </li></ul><ul><li>+ Priorities </li></ul><ul><li>+ Scope </li></ul><ul><li>+ Focus </li></ul><ul><li>+ Terminology </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide # The DW needs to be owned by the business
  69. 69. <ul><li>At a minimum project governance should include: </li></ul><ul><li>A project plan , detailing (high level) scope and timelines </li></ul><ul><li>Regular status meetings to share information </li></ul><ul><li>Change request process documentation </li></ul><ul><li>Standards and procedures for building a consistent DW </li></ul><ul><li>Version control and backup procedures </li></ul><ul><li>Ownership of specific environments and project roles </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide # Project governance
  70. 70. Utilizing Experienced Team Members Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  71. 71. <ul><li>Productivity within a data warehouse implementation is dependent on having experienced team members – both on business side and also on the technical side </li></ul><ul><li>Experienced Subject Matter Experts (SME) provide a thorough understanding of the business and its needs </li></ul><ul><li>Experienced data warehouse developers can take those requirements and turn them into a functioning data warehouse in a rapid timeframe </li></ul>Utilizing Experienced Team Members Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  72. 72. Selecting the Right Infrastructure Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  73. 73. <ul><li>Sufficient hardware and technology infrastructure during development </li></ul><ul><li>Lower productivity can translate into slower development cycles and iterations, which stands the risk of losing project momentum </li></ul><ul><li>Trade-off between having adequately sized hardware and the cost associated with purchasing that hardware </li></ul><ul><li>One way to mitigate undersized hardware is to use smaller subsets of data during the prototyping phase </li></ul>Selecting the Right Infrastructure Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  74. 74. <ul><li>Treat the Warehousing as a process, not a project </li></ul>Conclusion Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  75. 75. <ul><li>This means: </li></ul><ul><li>focusing on iterative releases and rollouts that follow in quick succession </li></ul><ul><li>keeping the warehouse in line with the ever changing needs of the business , instead of treating it as a one-time project </li></ul><ul><li>In order to achieve this, a change in the development approach and tools utilized for building the data warehouse must be adopted </li></ul>Conclusion Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  76. 76. <ul><li>The key factors to creating a successful data warehouse are: </li></ul><ul><li>-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- </li></ul><ul><li>Implementing the True Development Approach </li></ul><ul><li>Choosing a Rapid Development Product </li></ul><ul><li>Ensuring Data Availability </li></ul><ul><li>Involving Key Users throughout the whole project </li></ul><ul><li>Relying on a Pragmatic Governance Framework </li></ul><ul><li>Utilizing experienced Team Members </li></ul><ul><li>Selecting the right hardware and other related Infrastructure Technology </li></ul>Conclusion Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #
  77. 77. <ul><li>Raphael Klebanov, Analyst at WhereScape </li></ul><ul><li>Office Phone: 303.968.0703 </li></ul><ul><li>Email address: rklebanov@wherescape.com </li></ul><ul><li>Public Profile: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.linkedin.com/in/raphaelklebanov </li></ul>My personal information: Copyright © 2009 by WhereScape Software | Slide #

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