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JOHARI’s WINDOW
JOHARI’s WINDOW
 The Johari Window, named after Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham, is a
Disclosure/Feedback model of awareness. It was first u...
 In a new group, Quadrant I is very small; there is not much free and
spontaneous interaction. As the group grows and mat...
 PRINCIPLES OF CHANGE WITHIN THE JOHARI WINDOW
 1. A change in any one quadrant will affect all other quadrants.
 2. It...
REDUCING BLIND AREA – BY SEEKING FEEDBACK FROM OTHERS
REDUCING HIDDEN AREA – BY SHARING INFORMATION ABOUT SELF
WHEN UNKOWN AREA IS LARGE – IT LEADS TO SMALLER OPEN/ FREE
AREA
REDUCING UNKNOWN AREA BY EXPOSING
ONESELF TO NEW LEARNINGS
Johari window
Johari window
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Johari window

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Johari Window Explained

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Johari window

  1. 1. JOHARI’s WINDOW
  2. 2. JOHARI’s WINDOW
  3. 3.  The Johari Window, named after Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham, is a Disclosure/Feedback model of awareness. It was first used in an information session at the Western Training Laboratory in Group Development in 1955. Rather than measuring personality, the Window offers a way of looking at how personality is expressed.  QUADRANT I. The area of free activity or public area, refers to behavior and motivation known to self and known to others.  QUADRANT II, The blind area, where others can see things in ourselves of which we are unaware.  QUADRANT III. The avoided or hidden areas, represents things we know but do not reveal to others, (e.g., a hidden agenda, or matters about which we have sensitive feelings).  QUADRANT IV. Areas of unknown activity, in which neither the individual nor others are aware of certain behaviors or motives. Yet, we can assume their existence because eventually some of these behaviors and motives were influencing our relationship all along.
  4. 4.  In a new group, Quadrant I is very small; there is not much free and spontaneous interaction. As the group grows and matures, Quadrant I expands in size, and this usually means we are freer to be more like ourselves and to perceive others as they really are.  Quadrant III shrinks in area as Quadrant I grows larger. We find it less necessary to hind or deny things we know or feel. In an atmosphere of growing mutual trust, there is less need for hiding pertinent thoughts or feelings.  It takes longer for Quadrant II to reduce in size, because usually there are "good“ reasons of a psychological nature to blind ourselves to the things we feel or do.  Quadrant IV changes somewhat during a learning laboratory, but we can assume that such changes occur even more slowly than shifts in Quadrant II. At any rate, Quadrant IV is undoubtedly far larger and more influential in an individual's relationships than the hypothetical sketch illustrates.
  5. 5.  PRINCIPLES OF CHANGE WITHIN THE JOHARI WINDOW  1. A change in any one quadrant will affect all other quadrants.  2. It takes energy to hide, deny, or to be blind to behavior which is involved in interaction.  3. Threat tends to decrease awareness; mutual trust tends to increase awareness.  4. Forced awareness (exposure) is undesirable and usually ineffective.  5. Interpersonal learning means a change has taken place so that Quadrant I is larger, and one or more of the other quadrants has grown smaller.  6. The smaller the first quadrant, the poorer the communication.  7. Sensitivity means appreciating the covert aspects of behavior, in Quadrants II. III. IV. and respecting the desire of others to keep them so.
  6. 6. REDUCING BLIND AREA – BY SEEKING FEEDBACK FROM OTHERS
  7. 7. REDUCING HIDDEN AREA – BY SHARING INFORMATION ABOUT SELF
  8. 8. WHEN UNKOWN AREA IS LARGE – IT LEADS TO SMALLER OPEN/ FREE AREA
  9. 9. REDUCING UNKNOWN AREA BY EXPOSING ONESELF TO NEW LEARNINGS

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