Lecture 7bMID RENAISSANCEINTRO TO WESTERN HUMANITIES
Northern Renaissance
Robert Campin, Merode Altarpiece c. 1425While this and other Northern Renaissance pieces often do not have theaccurate per...
Jan van Eyck, Ghent Altarpiece, c. 1432
Jan van Eyck,Arnolfini Portrait, c. 1434
5cm or 2.2”              10cm or 4”
Garden of Eden          World Before the Flood            Hell                 Hieronymus Bosch, Garden of Earthly Delight...
Albrect Durer (1471-1528)Self portrait, 1484 [13 yrs old],the youngest self portrait in arthistory
Albrect DurerSelf Portrait 1493[22 yrs old],painted to send to hisfiancé (whom he hadnever met)
Albrecht Dürer,Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, c. 1497-1498.Woodcut, 15 2/5" x 11".
Gutenberg printing press [1450]
In the 15th century, we can also see atransformation in artist’s willingness tomake the human body a focus of attention.
Masaccio [1425]The Expulsion of Adam and Eve
Descent from the Cross,c. 1435-1438
Botticelli, Mars and Venus, c. 1475.
Sandro Botticelli, Primavera, c. 1482.
Botticelli, Birth of Venus, c. 1480
Girolamo Savonarola (1452 –1498) wasan Italian Dominican friar and an influential contributor tothe politics of Florence f...
Some Florentine artists responded toSavaronola’s sermons by transforming theirvisual style and returning to a more pietist...
David, by Donatello, c. 1430-1440 vsThe Penitent Magdalene, by Donatello, c.
Botticelli late works, post Savonarola,demonstrate a very noticeable rejection of theclassically-inspired worldview of his...
Execution of Savonarola and hisCompanions in Piazza Della Signoria,Florence, 1498
Other artists, especially those hiredby the papal court in Rome (and lateralso by the merchants in Venice),appear to have ...
Raphael. The Fornarina, c. 1518.
Giorgione, Sleeping Venus, c. 1509.
Titian. Venus of Urbino, c. 153
Indeed this style of femalerepresentation became a common idiomduring the next 400 years of Europeanpainting.
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
 Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance
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Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance

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Seventh lecture for GNED 1202 (Texts and Ideas). It is a required general education course for all first-year students at Mount Royal University in Calgary, Canada. My version of the course is structured as a kind of Intro to Western Civilization style course.

The Renaissance lecture has been divided into three parts. This is the second.

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  • While this and other Northern Renaissance pieces often do not have the accurate perspective of contemporary Italian works, there is an attention to detail (often requiring a magnifying glass to see) as well as less homage to classical forms.
  • Albrect Durer (1471-1528) self portrait, 1484 [13 yrs old], the youngest self portrait in art history
  • Albrect Durer (1471-1528) self portrait, 1493 [22 yrs old], painted to send to his fiancé (who he had never met)
  • Albrecht Dürer, Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, c. 1497-1498. Woodcut, 15 2/5" x 11".
  • Masaccio. The Expulson of Adam and Eve
  • David , by Donatello, c. 1430-1440. First large-scale nude sculpture since antiquity (1000+ years).
  • Botticelli, Mars and Venus, c. 1475.
  • Sandro Botticelli, Primavera, c. 1482.
  • Botticelli, Birth of Venus, c. 1480
  • Girolamo Savonarola (1452 –1498) was an Italian Dominican friar and an influential contributor to the politics of Florence from 1494 until his execution in 1498. He was known for his book burning, destruction of what he considered immoral art, and his vehement preaching against the moral corruption of much of the clergy at the time.
  • David , by Donatello, c. 1430-1440 vs The Penitent Magdalene, by Donatello, c. 1453-55. Change in piety and representational styles between the young artist and the mature artist.
  • Botticelli late works, post Savonarola, demonstrate a very noticeable rejection of the classically-inspired worldview of his earlier works. Shown here: Lamentation over the Dead Christ with Saints (1490) Mystic Nativity (1501)
  • Execution of Savonarola and his Companions in Piazza Della Signoria, Florence, 1498
  • Raphael, Galatea, Rome, c. 1512.
  • Villa Farnesina
  • Raphael. The Fornarina, c. 1518.
  • Giorgione, Sleeping Venus, c. 1509.
  • Titian. Venus of Urbino, c. 1538 Dog= fidelity + desire
  • Introduction to Western Humanities - 7b Mid and Northern Renaissance

    1. 1. Lecture 7bMID RENAISSANCEINTRO TO WESTERN HUMANITIES
    2. 2. Northern Renaissance
    3. 3. Robert Campin, Merode Altarpiece c. 1425While this and other Northern Renaissance pieces often do not have theaccurate perspective of contemporary Italian works, there is an attention todetail (often requiring a magnifying glass to see) as well as less homageto classical forms.
    4. 4. Jan van Eyck, Ghent Altarpiece, c. 1432
    5. 5. Jan van Eyck,Arnolfini Portrait, c. 1434
    6. 6. 5cm or 2.2” 10cm or 4”
    7. 7. Garden of Eden World Before the Flood Hell Hieronymus Bosch, Garden of Earthly Delight, c. 1510
    8. 8. Albrect Durer (1471-1528)Self portrait, 1484 [13 yrs old],the youngest self portrait in arthistory
    9. 9. Albrect DurerSelf Portrait 1493[22 yrs old],painted to send to hisfiancé (whom he hadnever met)
    10. 10. Albrecht Dürer,Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, c. 1497-1498.Woodcut, 15 2/5" x 11".
    11. 11. Gutenberg printing press [1450]
    12. 12. In the 15th century, we can also see atransformation in artist’s willingness tomake the human body a focus of attention.
    13. 13. Masaccio [1425]The Expulsion of Adam and Eve
    14. 14. Descent from the Cross,c. 1435-1438
    15. 15. Botticelli, Mars and Venus, c. 1475.
    16. 16. Sandro Botticelli, Primavera, c. 1482.
    17. 17. Botticelli, Birth of Venus, c. 1480
    18. 18. Girolamo Savonarola (1452 –1498) wasan Italian Dominican friar and an influential contributor tothe politics of Florence from 1494 until his execution in1498. He was known for his book burning, destruction ofwhat he considered immoral art, and his vehementpreaching against the moral corruption of much of theclergy at the time.
    19. 19. Some Florentine artists responded toSavaronola’s sermons by transforming theirvisual style and returning to a more pietisticstyle …
    20. 20. David, by Donatello, c. 1430-1440 vsThe Penitent Magdalene, by Donatello, c.
    21. 21. Botticelli late works, post Savonarola,demonstrate a very noticeable rejection of theclassically-inspired worldview of his earlierworks.Shown here:Lamentation over the Dead Christ with Saints (1490)Mystic Nativity (1501)
    22. 22. Execution of Savonarola and hisCompanions in Piazza Della Signoria,Florence, 1498
    23. 23. Other artists, especially those hiredby the papal court in Rome (and lateralso by the merchants in Venice),appear to have been unmoved bySavaronola, and we continue to seeclassical-inspired themes and aninterest in representing the humanbody.Raphael, Galatea, Rome, c. 1512.
    24. 24. Raphael. The Fornarina, c. 1518.
    25. 25. Giorgione, Sleeping Venus, c. 1509.
    26. 26. Titian. Venus of Urbino, c. 153
    27. 27. Indeed this style of femalerepresentation became a common idiomduring the next 400 years of Europeanpainting.

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