1355813121 solar power in india

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  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE
  • 1355813121 solar power in india

    1. 1. A SEMINAR REPORT ON “SOLAR POWER IN INDIA” Submitted byTapas Ranjan Mahto Regd. No:0901223512 1
    2. 2. SUBMITTED TO- Mr. JEETAMITRA MOHANTY Ms. SAMPRATI MOHANTY 2
    3. 3. CONTENT •What is solar power? •Why its time to look towards renewable energy sources? •Is our climate is suitable for solar energy? •Where India now and its total installed capacity? •Photovoltaic effect •The Grid-tied PV Installation •Concentrated solar power •Government supports •Challenges & opportunities •Application of solar energy •Conclusion •References 3
    4. 4. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE What is solar power? solar power is the conversion of sunlight into electricity. its done in two ways1. Directly Using photovoltaic(PV) 2. Indirectly using concentrated solar power (CSP) 4
    5. 5. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE Why its time to look towards renewable energy sources? 1.Around 400 millions Indians don’t have electricity access include 10000 unelectrified villages. 2.Indias coal reserves are projected to run out in four decades. 3.Due to production of more then three-quarters of electricity produced by burning coals and natural gas ,carbon emission is around 1.6 billion tons world highest. 5
    6. 6. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE Is our climate is suitable for solar energy? 1.India has high solar insolation. 2.With 300 sunny days in a year, India can generates about 600 TW of power. 3.India has 1500-2000 sunshine hours per year with daily average solar energy incident over India varies from 4 to 7 kWh/m2 ,which is far more then current total energy consumption. 6
    7. 7. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE India's solar resources geographically 7
    8. 8. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE Where India now and its total installed capacity? 1.Total energy produced through solar is less then 1% of total demand. 2.The grid-interactive solar power as of December 2010 was merely 10 MW. 3. Government-funded solar energy in India only accounted for approximately 6.4 MW-yr of power. 4. Solar power generation is merely concentrated in three states. Gujarat Rajasthan Maharashtra 8
    9. 9. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE Technology aspectsMainly following two technology used1. Directly Using photovoltaic(PV)based on principle of photovoltaic effect. 2. Indirectly using concentrated solar power (CSP)- 9
    10. 10. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE 1. Directly Using photovoltaic(PV)PV is an electrical device which convert light directly into electricity by the photovoltaic effects is used, called solar cell . mainly constructed with•Monocrystalline silicon •Polycrystalline silicon •Amorphous silicon •Cadmium telluride 10
    11. 11. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE Photovoltaic effect- 1. When sun light falls on silicon metal cell. 2. Electron on the valance band observes the energy in the form of heat, and get excited and goes to conduction band. 3. These free electron conduction band attracted towards positive electrode, thus circuit gets complete and current starts follow. 11
    12. 12. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE Construction of PV panel*constructed from thin wafers of crystalline silicon, 150mm by 150mm by 180 – 360 microns thick. 12
    13. 13. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE Solar cells*directly convert light into electricity. 1.light(fotons) 2.Front contact 3.Negative layer 4.diversion layer 5.positive layer 6.back contact 13
    14. 14. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE Structure of solar cell1.Silicon cell may be of the type single crystalline, multi crystalline or amorphous. 2. difference between these cells is how the silicon atoms are ordered, the crystalline structure. Monocrystalline polycrystalline flexible amorphous 14
    15. 15. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE Solar panelSolar panels consist of solar cells. As one single solar cell does not produce sufficient energy for most purposes, solar cells are put together in solar panels so that they produce more electricity jointly. 15
    16. 16. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE The Grid-tied PV InstallationThe energy output from a single PV panel is typically in the range of 180 - 250 Watts in bright sunshine. A photovoltaic system is normally built up from a number of panels (an array), linked together to produce a more significant energy output. 16
    17. 17. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE Concentrated solar poweruse mirrors or lenses to concentrate a large area of sunlight, or solar thermal energy, onto a small area. 17
    18. 18. Government supportsKRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE 1. 51 Solar Radiation Resource Assessment stations have been installed across India by the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy(MNRE) to monitor the availability of solar energy. 2. The Ministry of New and Renewable Energy provides 70 percent subsidy on the installation cost of a solar photovoltaic power plant in North-East states and 30 percentage subsidy on other regions. 3. the government has announced an allocation of 10 billion (US$182 million) towards the Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission and the establishment of a clean energy fund the-East states and 30 percentage subsidy on other regions 18
    19. 19. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE Challenges 1.Land- per capita land availability is low. Needed approximately 1 km2 for every 20–60 megawatts (MW) generation. 2. High cost of solar panels. opportunities1.Since India being a densely populated region in the sunny tropical belt the subcontinent has ideal combination of both high solar insolation and therefore a big potential consumer base density. 2.India can make renewable resources such as solar the backbone of its economy by 2050, reining in its long-term carbon emissions without compromising its economic growth potential. 19
    20. 20. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE Application of solar energy1.Rural electrification. 2.Solar lamps and lightning. 3.Agriculture support. 4.Solar water heaters. 20
    21. 21. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE Conclusion:“Solar energy is not just another alternate source of electricity, but the only reliable, scalable and simple solution to address global warming” Solar energy is one of the first forms of energy discovered by humans. For centuries, we have knowingly and unknowingly been harnessing energy from the sun in various ways for various reasons – to heat, to generate fire, to dry, to light up, and so on – with or without using technology - passively or actively. Passive Solar Energy is one where we alter our way of creating, planning and living our structures, activities and lives to best utilize sunlight and the heat from it. For example, farmers follow solar and seasonal cycles to plan their farming based on the intensity of the sun and its effects on the monsoon and water patterns. Active Solar Energy on the other hand is science and technology driven wherein we capture the heat from the sun and reuse it at a time and in a form convenient for us – mainly as electricity. 21
    22. 22. KRUPAJAL ENGINEERING COLLEGE References- Websites1.www.wikipedia.org 2. www.viridiansolar.co.uk Books1.Solar electricity handbook 2.Solar photovoltaic-2011 edition 3.Energy autonomy 22
    23. 23. Thank you! 23

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