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Organised crime in the garb of religion in 19th Century
India -Thuggee
1
Any man’s death diminishes me,
Because I am invol...
Organised crime in the garb of religion
in 19th Century India -Thuggee
2
Major General Sir William Henry Sleeman K. C. B.
...
Organised crime in the garb of religion in
19th Century India -Thuggee
• The Thug Menace
• More than a hundred Thug gangs ...
Organised crime in the garb of religion in
19th Century India -Thuggee
• Index
• A. Results of the Dept. of Thuggee
• B. T...
A. Results of The Department of Thuggee
The Department for the Suppression of Thuggee was founded on 10th
January 1835.
It...
B.Thugs
• Were members of a criminal religious society known to
have existed as early as 12th
century. Derived name from
s...
Thugs…2
As per Samachar Darpan, a respectable newspaper of those
days, Thug gangs killed on an average 10,000 travellers e...
Thugs…3
Legend/Myth of Kali or Kan Kali /Rukt Beej Dana
Origin of the divine profession
(Changed from the original Durga S...
Thugs…4
She condescended to present them with one of her teeth for a
pickaxe, a rib for a knife, and the hem of her skirt ...
Thugs ….5
HISTORICAL REFERENCES
• Herodatus-Sagartii
• Assassins-Hassan-Ul-Sabbah
• Tarikhe Feroze Shahi by Zia-ud-din Bur...
Thugs-Modus Operandi
 The Sotha or the inveigler would lure innocent travelers to accompany
them while travelling for mut...
Thugs in captivity giving a demonstration
of their modus operandi.
Photo: Felice Beato 1855
• .
12
Viewer discretion is advised
• We are about to show a clip from the movie
• THE DECEIVERS
• by Merchant Ivory Productions....
14
C. Sleeman
• Major General Sir William Henry Sleeman was a man of zeal and spirit far above
the ordinary and his extraordi...
Sleeman
You shall be a great loss to the country in the administration of
which you have had so great a share and I know n...
Sleeman
 Sir W. H. Sleeman was an accomplished Oriental linguist, well
versed in Arabic, Persian, Urdu as well as Latin, ...
Sir William Henry Sleeman K.C.B.
(Sobriquet Thuggee Sleeman)
• William Henry Sleeman popularly known as Thuggee Sleeman wa...
Sleeman
• Agriculturist-Introduced the sugarcane, Saccharum
violaaceum from Mauritius in India and was awarded the
Gold me...
Sleeman
• Wife- He married a French woman from an émigrés noble
family. Amélie Josephine Blandin de Chalain de Fontenne.
•...
Sleeman
He formed a school of Industry and a Factory with a high brick wall on the
periphery and sheds inside, where convi...
Sleeman
• Sleeman's wrote a number of books or reports e.g.
• Ramaaseana (785 pages) or the secret language of the Thugs a...
D Strategy of the Deptt. of Thuggee
• Crime maps and genealogical trees. A meticulous study of all
approvers’ statements e...
Strategy adopted by the Deptt. of Thuggee
Theme map of Thug Depradation -1836
24
Strategy adopted by the Deptt. of Thuggee –
Thug Genealogical Chart –Organisation Chart
SLEEMAN’S LIST
25
Strategy of the Thuggee Department
• Crime maps and genealogical
trees. A meticulous study of all
approvers’ statements en...
Strategy adopted by the Deptt. of Thuggee
• Exradition treaties signed with Indian States by EIC.
• Approvers-The departme...
Strategy …2
• Informers: Even apprehended thugs were allowed freedom to
work inside a gang as informers in return for a re...
Strategy…3
• Communication. Circulation of crime theme maps and
wanted criminals was a regular affair in the department.
S...
History of Thuggee Deptt.
The Department of Thuggee was given additional
responsibility to neutralise organised gangs of d...
.
The Log of the MonarchThe Log of the Monarch
 A journal of the proceedings on board the EAST INDIA SHIPA journal of the...
Guess who this is?
• HINT : He is the founder of the Deptt. of Economics at MIT and a Nobel Laureatte and his
family size ...
Annexure…2
Prof. Paul A. Samuelson
Professor of Economics MIT
Nobel Laureate Economics 1970
• Even crime and punishment ar...
Annexure…3
SEVEN HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PEOPLESEVEN HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PEOPLE
(STEPHEN R. COVEY)(STEPHEN R. CO...
William Sleeman a direct
descendant of Sir W.H.
Sleeman and Rajesh
Rampal at the former’s
residence in U.K.
William has ne...
Annexure…3
On a scale of 1 - 10 please grade the presentation
Feedback about the Faculty
 Knowledge level
 Enthusiasm fo...
Earlier Films on Thuggee
 The Deceivers
 http://www.britishempire.co.uk/media/adventure/thedeceivers.htm
 DirectorNicho...
38
Scene No1.
Sleeman died at Sea on 10th February, 1856 at 3.45 AM about 600 miles south of Sri Lanka
aboard the East Ind...
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  1. 1. Organised crime in the garb of religion in 19th Century India -Thuggee 1 Any man’s death diminishes me, Because I am involved in mankind And therefore never send to know For whom the bell tolls, It tolls for thee. John Donne
  2. 2. Organised crime in the garb of religion in 19th Century India -Thuggee 2 Major General Sir William Henry Sleeman K. C. B. (He made India’s roads safe for travel and commerce and was instrumental in the abolition of Sati in India)  
  3. 3. Organised crime in the garb of religion in 19th Century India -Thuggee • The Thug Menace • More than a hundred Thug gangs prowled India’s highways and annually killed about 40,000 travellers in the early 19th century. The Thugs were held together by a perversion of religion that made killing a part of worship. The gangs were knit together by a strange and bizarre regimen of life, that destroyed their victims with a combination of guile and cruelty almost unparalleled in the history of crime anywhere in the world. The Thugs had been plying their trade undetected for nearly 500 years. • K. F. Rustomji , Former D. G., B.S.F. 3
  4. 4. Organised crime in the garb of religion in 19th Century India -Thuggee • Index • A. Results of the Dept. of Thuggee • B. Thugs & Modus Operandi • C. Sir William H. Sleeman • D. Strategy of the Dept. of Thuggee • F. Plates -1.Thugs demonstrating 2. Sleeman 3. Theme map depicting depradations. 4. Thug genealogical tree. 4
  5. 5. A. Results of The Department of Thuggee The Department for the Suppression of Thuggee was founded on 10th January 1835. It was the first specialized department to be created in the world to tackle Organised crime and also for rehabilitation of convicts and their progeny. By 1840 the following results had been achieved. • Sent for trials ……………………… 3689 • Sentenced to be hanged …………….466 • Transported for Life ………………. 1564 • Imprisoned for Life ………………… 933 • Confined for various periods ……… 81 • Set free for good conduct …………… 86 • Escaped ……………………………….. 12 • Approvers …………………………….. 56 • Died before trials…………………… 208 • Acquitted………………………………… 97 • Balance ………………………………….186 5
  6. 6. B.Thugs • Were members of a criminal religious society known to have existed as early as 12th century. Derived name from sthag in Sanskrit - to conceal. They were worshippers of Goddess Kali. • More than a hundred gangs. A joint venture between Hindus and Muslims. • The sect of thugs had deep roots in Indian mythology • Murder was committed with a degree of perfection. Clear- cut responsibilities were laid out for each gang member- Strangulator, Evidence concealer, the inveigler. The leader/boss was titled Jemadar. His assistant carried the sacred axe, the emblem of the Goddess and was the omen reader/analyst/priest to the Gang. 6
  7. 7. Thugs…2 As per Samachar Darpan, a respectable newspaper of those days, Thug gangs killed on an average 10,000 travellers every year between Narbada and the Sutlej. The figure for the whole of India was estimated to be 40,000 by Col. James Sleeman. • Thugs had their own language with secret signs and fierce loyalty towards each other. They were guided by omens. How Thugs went undetected for Centuries • Lack of communication and primitive modes of travel. No census. • Multiple states and jurisdiction issues. • Prejudices to give evidence against thugs • No evidence left behind by the Thugs • Forward movement • Protection from landlords /princes in return for blood money. 7
  8. 8. Thugs…3 Legend/Myth of Kali or Kan Kali /Rukt Beej Dana Origin of the divine profession (Changed from the original Durga Saptshati and Devi Mahamatya by Thugs) • Once on a time the world was infested with a monstrous demon named Rukt Bij-dana, who devoured mankind as fast as they were created. So gigantic was his stature, that the deepest pools of the ocean reached no higher than his waist. Kali cut the demon with her sword as ordained by Lord Siva, the Lord of Destruction, but from every drop of blood that fell to the ground there sprang a new demon. She went on destroying them, till the hellish brood multiplied so fast that she waxed hot and weary with her endless task. She paused for a while, and from the sweat, brushed off one of her arms, she created two men, to whom she gave a rumal, or handkerchief, and commanded them to strangle the demons. When they had slain them all, they offered to return the rumal, but the goddess bade them keep it and transmit it to their posterity, with the injunction to destroy all men who were not of their kindred. 8
  9. 9. Thugs…4 She condescended to present them with one of her teeth for a pickaxe, a rib for a knife, and the hem of her skirt for a noose, and ordered them, for the future, to cut and bury the bodies of whom they destroyed. She also bade them to follow her omens. 9
  10. 10. Thugs ….5 HISTORICAL REFERENCES • Herodatus-Sagartii • Assassins-Hassan-Ul-Sabbah • Tarikhe Feroze Shahi by Zia-ud-din Burni (The History of India as told by its Historians- Eliot and Dowson.) • Monsieur Jean De Thevenot -French Traveler to India- Voyage Contenant de La I’ndostan 1684 AD. • Guru Nanak and Sajjan Thug of Multan • Dr Sherwood-Asiatic Researches 1816 AD-On the Murderers called Phansigars or Strangulators. • General St. Leger – order dated 28th April 1810 cautioning troops going on leave to beware of Thugs. 10
  11. 11. Thugs-Modus Operandi  The Sotha or the inveigler would lure innocent travelers to accompany them while travelling for mutual safety from robbers and wild animals. The Thugs would masquerade as pilgrims or soldiers to ward off any suspicion. The lughas -evidence concealers would travel in advance and keep the Bels (Graves) ready for burying the victims at pre-designated stops, sometimes even chosen at the spur of the moment. The Jemadar or the leader would give the jhirni(signal) and the Bhatotes or strangulators would position themselves and strangulate the victims in a trice with their scarves. The Lughas would deprive the victim of all valuables, make gashes in the victims stomach and fill the voids with mud to avoid the body swelling up and coming up after burial. The Bel would be covered and all traces /evidence removed. The gang moved ahead in search of new victims. They hunted with deceit, only the two legged creature, nothing else. Prayers, fasting, sacrifice to the goddess were rituals strictly adhered to. They usually killed without any bloodshed as ordained. Sikhs, barbers, carpenters, women, man with goat/cow, oil man , mutilated or handicapped man were exempted.  Similar to Garrotte –Godfather. Spain, France etc. 11
  12. 12. Thugs in captivity giving a demonstration of their modus operandi. Photo: Felice Beato 1855 • . 12
  13. 13. Viewer discretion is advised • We are about to show a clip from the movie • THE DECEIVERS • by Merchant Ivory Productions. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDskcfkKTrQ • Director: Nicholas Meyer Producer: Ismail Merchant Screenplay: Michael Hirst, from the novel by John Masters Photography: Walter Lassally Music: John Scott Editor: Richard Trevor Production design: Ken Adam Costumes: Jenny Beavan and John Bright Executive producer: Michael White Casting director: Celestia Fox and Jennifer Jaffrey • 13
  14. 14. 14
  15. 15. C. Sleeman • Major General Sir William Henry Sleeman was a man of zeal and spirit far above the ordinary and his extraordinary tenacity of purpose was in the final analysis the reason why Thuggee could be eliminated. The legal procedures of the time also helped a lot as they permitted quick and effective trials and deterrent punishment to thugs • K.F.Rustomji DG BSF (One of independent India's most respectable policeman) – In the centenary issue of the Indian Police Journal –Thugs, Pindaris and Dacoits. • I am a retired police officer. As a philatelist specializing in police stamps, I have brought out a special picture postcard on Sleeman, the greatest policeman who ever lived, destroyed a cult, who were responsible for a million murders over centuries. I am still interested in the exploits of great policemen of the past. Sleeman is the greatest policeman of all times. • Sidney Kitson (Indian Police Service 1954) • To tackle terrorism, a federal unit like Sir W. H. Sleeman’s Anti-Thuggee force should be created. Are our state leaders listening? V. Balachandran I.P.S. (1959) (Sleeman’s List- Asian Age- 12 September 2006) Former Special Secretary, Cabinet Secretariat.` 15
  16. 16. Sleeman You shall be a great loss to the country in the administration of which you have had so great a share and I know not how you would be replaced in that work so important to humanity, of the extirpation of the Thugs, which has been successfully carried on towards its complete accomplishment under your especial direction.  Believe me with great esteem and respect.  Very truly yours  William H. Bentinck  India's Governor General.  (In a letter to Sleeman on July 18,1834 written from Ootacamond in his own handwriting.)  This letter was in response to Sleeman’s resignation on account of persistent illness. Sleeman later withdrew his resignation. 16
  17. 17. Sleeman  Sir W. H. Sleeman was an accomplished Oriental linguist, well versed in Arabic, Persian, Urdu as well as Latin, Greek and French. His works afford many proofs of the keen interest which he took in the sciences of Geology, Agricultural Chemistry and Political Economy and of his intelligent appreciation of the lessons taught by history. Nor was he insensible to the charms of art, specially poetry. His knowledge of the customs and modes of thought of the people of India, which has rarely been equalled and never been surpassed was more than half the secret of his notable success as an Administrator. The greatest achievement of his unselfish and busy life was the suppression of the system of the organized murder known as Thuggee and in the execution of that prolonged and onerous task he displayed the most delicate tact, the keenest sagacity and extraordinary power of organization  Vincent Arthur Smith I. C. S. 17
  18. 18. Sir William Henry Sleeman K.C.B. (Sobriquet Thuggee Sleeman) • William Henry Sleeman popularly known as Thuggee Sleeman was the General Superintendent of the Department of Suppression of Thugee and Dacoitee for the whole of India . Sleeman died at sea (aboard the East India ship Monarch and was buried at sea) on Sunday 10th February 1856. • He was knighted on 5th February 1856 after 46 years of unbroken service in India. • Administrator-par excellence. Adept at Famine and epidemic handling. Was easily accessible, sympathetic and considerate. Action oriented. Decision maker. • Environmentalist-planted fruit trees on both sides of the roads for travelers for 86 miles. 18
  19. 19. Sleeman • Agriculturist-Introduced the sugarcane, Saccharum violaaceum from Mauritius in India and was awarded the Gold medal by the Indian Agricultural Society. • Religion-was a private affair but when he was not blessed with a child even after four years of marriage he had no qualms in visiting a shrine to seek blessings for a child. His prayers were answered and Henry Arthur was born on January 6th 1833. He donated land and money for the shrine. The shrine still exists in the town of Sleemanabad in M.P. in India, where people still revere him. He got married on 28th June 1828 in Jabalpur at the Christchurch. • Human-His views on the practice of Impressments and press gangs, flogging, purveyance and on Slavery are well documented in his books and show his Humanist nature. • Policeman par excellence. Army Officer. Absolutely Spartan in his habits. 19
  20. 20. Sleeman • Wife- He married a French woman from an émigrés noble family. Amélie Josephine Blandin de Chalain de Fontenne. • Friendly nature-He was a master of many languages -Arabic, Latin, English, French, Urdu, Persian and Greek. His mastery over many Indian languages won him many friends in India. • Author-his many works are for a serious reader only whether on crime or economics or general administration. • Social reformer-He banned the practice of Sati in Jabalpur district in March 1828 on taking charge as a Collector of the district. The EIC banned the practice vide Act XVI in December 1829 in the Bengal Presidency. The ban was extended to Madras and Bombay presidencies much later. 20
  21. 21. Sleeman He formed a school of Industry and a Factory with a high brick wall on the periphery and sheds inside, where convicts carried and learnt alternate various professions like blanket making, wick making, carpet weaving, blacksmiths, dyers, spinners, carpenters .This was established in 1837. The same premises house a vocational school these days in Jabalpur. • A village for approvers was also set up and was surrounded by a mud wall. They were however subject to surveillance. Captain Brown was responsible for these reformatories. The Thugs interned here weaved a carpet 80 feet by 40 feet weighing two tons for Queen Victoria and this was taken to the Waterloo Chambers in the Windsor Castle. • Christchurch School and Jabalpur College in 1835. • Three attempts were made on Sleeman’s life. He escaped on all occasions. 21
  22. 22. Sleeman • Sleeman's wrote a number of books or reports e.g. • Ramaaseana (785 pages) or the secret language of the Thugs and measures taken by the Government to eradicate them. • System of Megpunnaism (A rare form of thugee kidnapping for ransom). • Report on the Depredations of thug gangs of Upper and Central India (549 pages) • Rambles and Recollections of an Indian Official (917 Pages) • Bagree dacoits (433 pages) • Journey through the Kingdom of Oudh (760 pages) and • On the Doctrine of Ricardo. ------------------------------------------------- • STUART N. GORDON’S VIEW …… • Bobby –London Policeman’s nick name WHY? 22
  23. 23. D Strategy of the Deptt. of Thuggee • Crime maps and genealogical trees. A meticulous study of all approvers’ statements enabled them to draw up genealogical trees and charts, obtain an accurate knowledge of the modus operandi and the social practices of the Thugs and finally to forecast movements and mark out criminals that had to be sought out and arrested. Theme maps to eradicate cholera in London were used in England in 1854. New York police introduced in 1998 -Compstat system. 23
  24. 24. Strategy adopted by the Deptt. of Thuggee Theme map of Thug Depradation -1836 24
  25. 25. Strategy adopted by the Deptt. of Thuggee – Thug Genealogical Chart –Organisation Chart SLEEMAN’S LIST 25
  26. 26. Strategy of the Thuggee Department • Crime maps and genealogical trees. A meticulous study of all approvers’ statements enabled them to draw up genealogical trees and charts, obtain an accurate knowledge of the modus operandi and the social practices of the Thugs and finally to forecast movements and mark out criminals that had to be sought out and arrested. Theme maps to eradicate cholera in London were used in England in 1854. New York police introduced in 1998 -Compstat system. Thematic crime maps were used in India in 1836! 26
  27. 27. Strategy adopted by the Deptt. of Thuggee • Exradition treaties signed with Indian States by EIC. • Approvers-The department relied on approvers for evidence and a reprieve in return. This method was also used for the first time in India. • Changes were incorporated in the Laws for severe and deterrent punishment, removal of courts jurisdictions and punishment as per the Judge rather than the dictate/fatwas of the Maulvis. Reference specially to the ACT XXX of 1836. • Judges used to travel to the site of the crime and set up courts and decided the criminal cases immediately. Punishments were immediately carried out. • ACT XXX 1836 • 1. It is hereby enacted that whoever shall be proved to have belonged either before or after passing of this act to have belonged to any gang of Thugs either within or without the territories of the East India Company shall be punishable with imprisonment for life with hard labour. • 2. And it is hereby enacted that every person accused of the offence made punishable by this ACT may be tried by any court ,which would have been competent to try him,if this offence had been committed within the district of that court sits ,anything to the contrary in any regulation not withstanding. • 3. And it is hereby enacted that no court shall on trial of any person accused of the offence made punishable by this Act require any futwah from any law officer. 27
  28. 28. Strategy …2 • Informers: Even apprehended thugs were allowed freedom to work inside a gang as informers in return for a reprieve. Feringhea, the Royal Thug was apprehended on the basis of informers. He turned approver and later on got a reprieve. He died an ascetic on the banks of the Narbada. Amir Ali had killed 783 victims but had no remorse as he said he served the Goddess. He had no remorse at having killed so many people. • Patrolling: Use of the crime maps and the subsequent analysis pointed out crime prone areas where patrolling was intensified and checkpoints introduced. • Mobility: Use of Cavalry by the policemen helped in greater mobility. Some policemen distinguished themselves in courageous deeds, which involved days of pursuit on horseback. • Firearm: Firearms were made available to the policemen. 28
  29. 29. Strategy…3 • Communication. Circulation of crime theme maps and wanted criminals was a regular affair in the department. Support of Lord William Bentinck -Governor General of India. Sleeman's access to Indian languages and Ramasi were added advantages. Easy accessibility to Sleeman, as an administrator by the general public and his concern for them were great assets to the deptt. • Administration: Administration was getting a firm grip over law and order and the police work in the thanas improved considerably with no political interference and a motivated police force. • Recruitment: Sleeman selected and handpicked the best men. A practice in vogue in the Intelligence Bureau till 1977 - earmarking scheme. First finger print bureau in the world? 29
  30. 30. History of Thuggee Deptt. The Department of Thuggee was given additional responsibility to neutralise organised gangs of dacoits. The Department later became the agency for the collection and collation of criminal intelligence, as also the rehabilitation of the former thugs and dacoits. With the promulgation of the Police Act 1861, and the Provincial Governments being given the responsibility for criminal administration, the Department lost much of its relevance as an organisation to deal with serious crimes. The foundation of the Indian Association by Surendra Nath Banerjee in 1876 resulted in the Thuggee and Dacoity Department being entrusted the additional duty of collecting secret and political intelligence. With the formation of the Central Special Branch (the precursor of the Intelligence Bureau, Central Bureau of Investigation and State Criminal Investigating Departments.) in 1887, the Thuggee department came to be associated with the Central Special Branch. The Thuggee Department was finally abolished in 1904, after about seventy years of glorious existence. 30
  31. 31. . The Log of the MonarchThe Log of the Monarch  A journal of the proceedings on board the EAST INDIA SHIPA journal of the proceedings on board the EAST INDIA SHIP ‘MONARCH’‘MONARCH’ Kept by Fleetwood John Williams ,Midshipman from CalcuttaKept by Fleetwood John Williams ,Midshipman from Calcutta towards London. Captain John Wiltshire in Command.towards London. Captain John Wiltshire in Command. ………………………………………………………………………………………………..……………..…………… Remarks Sunday ,February 10th ,1856. Courses SW 6 W.Remarks Sunday ,February 10th ,1856. Courses SW 6 W. Unsteady. Light Breeze and Fine .3.45 A.M Departed this lifeUnsteady. Light Breeze and Fine .3.45 A.M Departed this life Major General William Henry SleemanMajor General William Henry Sleeman  7.30 AM Tacked Ship7.30 AM Tacked Ship  10.30 Mustered Ship’s company and performed divine service10.30 Mustered Ship’s company and performed divine service for the departed soul on the quarter deck.for the departed soul on the quarter deck. Lat. By Obs. S 2.22 Long. By Obs. E 82.51Lat. By Obs. S 2.22 Long. By Obs. E 82.51 ------------------- Monday, February 11th , 1856. Courses E.N.E. Light and Fine. Throughout. 6.30 a.m. Committed the body of the departed to the deep with the usual ceremonies. -------------- 31 Annexure…1
  32. 32. Guess who this is? • HINT : He is the founder of the Deptt. of Economics at MIT and a Nobel Laureatte and his family size doubled when triplets arrived. 32
  33. 33. Annexure…2 Prof. Paul A. Samuelson Professor of Economics MIT Nobel Laureate Economics 1970 • Even crime and punishment are susceptible to economic analysis. Does crime pay? If there were no police and courts and never any punishments or deterrents to crime more people would find themselves rewarded by illegal activities. On the other hand, if strong locks are employed private and public guards employed who maintain a vigilant watch, if apprehension is likely, if trial is swift and the jury and the judge can be presumed to be quite accurate in distinguishing between the truly guilty and the innocent, that part of crime which is undertaken in the rational hope of reward may be reduced in total amount. 33
  34. 34. Annexure…3 SEVEN HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PEOPLESEVEN HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PEOPLE (STEPHEN R. COVEY)(STEPHEN R. COVEY)  Be Proactive - Sati, Pre-1835 Thuggee success  Begin with the End in Mind- Colonel Ouvry 9th Lancers  Put First Things First – Communication gaps reduced  Think Win/Win- Famine handling  Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood – Interrogations  Synergize – Approvers and even convicts as informers and allies.  Sharpen the Saw- Forever inquisitive and seeker of knowledge and an Author 34
  35. 35. William Sleeman a direct descendant of Sir W.H. Sleeman and Rajesh Rampal at the former’s residence in U.K. William has never been to India. A very private person, he has preserved the family heirlooms very well. You can see Sir W.H. Sleeman’s portrait, sword and baton in the background. Partly in the picture is the portrait of Lady Sleeman. 35
  36. 36. Annexure…3 On a scale of 1 - 10 please grade the presentation Feedback about the Faculty  Knowledge level  Enthusiasm for the subject  Arousing interest in the Subject  Ability to explain Subject  Ability to explain Questions  Other remarks if any.  Suggestions for Improvement  Would you like to read about this subject in further detail ?Fiction based on hard fact.  Would you like to see a movie on this subject if it were made?  Did you find the subject too complex?  Was there a lesson that you think we could learn from this presentation on how to tackle our present day problems globally on crime ?  Would you recommend that your seniors /juniors attend this presentation? ANY OTHER POINT?SUGGESTION: 36
  37. 37. Earlier Films on Thuggee  The Deceivers  http://www.britishempire.co.uk/media/adventure/thedeceivers.htm  DirectorNicholas MeyerYear1988StarringPierce Brosnan as William SavageBased on a story byJohn Masters  If the film has any faults, then it is only because of the film makers need or desire to create tension. Truth is generally stranger than fiction, hence the idea of the film in the first place. However, some of the coincidences and nick-of-time rescues are just too close to be believable. The film also gets a little tied down in some strange pseudo-religious mystical associations. Again, these are a little too far out of the scope of reality to be wholly believable. The fact that it is based on a true story, however loosely, makes this film even more of a useful film to watch.  The 1939 film, Gunga Din and the 1984 Indiana Jones film, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom are other films on the subject.  Another popular movie on the Thugs of Benaras was "Sunghursh" (1968) directed by Harnam Singh Rawail and based on a story Mahasweta Devi and it starred the legendary Indian actor of yesteryears Dilip Kumar. 37
  38. 38. 38 Scene No1. Sleeman died at Sea on 10th February, 1856 at 3.45 AM about 600 miles south of Sri Lanka aboard the East India ship MONARCH on his return to England after 46 years of unbroken service in India. Story starts in a flashback from the burial at sea on 11th February, 1856 6.30 AM. Scene I Long shot - MONARCH at High Seas. Close up- Captain John Wiltshire comes down on the deck. Sailors are busy stitching Sleeman's body into a canvas bag. Sailors give him the Naval salute. He salutes back. Captain enters the cabin where Midshipman Fleetwood John Williams salutes and puts up the Log of the Monarch for his signatures and says," The log for your signature. We are ready for the Burial, Captain." The Log of the Monarch A journal of the proceedings on board the EAST INDIA SHIP ‘MONARCH’ Kept by Fleetwood John Williams ,Midshipman from Calcutta towards London. Remarks Sunday ,February 10th ,1856 Light and Fine 3.45 A.M Departed this life Major General William Henry Sleeman. 7.30 AM Tacked Ship 10.30 Assembly on Quarter deck for divine service for the departed soul. Lat. By Obs. S 2.22 Long. By Obs. E 82.51 Captain signs and says,"John, give him the Union jack burial. I shall get Mrs Sleeman." "Aye, Aye , Sir" Captain walks down and knocks at a cabin. Opens the door and nods at Amelie inside. The body is now covered in the Union Jack with only the face showing. Amelie Nods. The Sailors pass the last stitch through the Union Jack and the Nose of the body. Amelie grimaces and turns her face away. The body is lowered into the Sea. Captain salutes. Guns are fired. The camera turns on Amelie and her face is full of tears. A fellow Lady Passenger asks," How did it all start." Amelie chokes and starts," It started ......"

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