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SPORTS INJURY

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SPORTS INJURY

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SPORTS INJURY

  1. 1. SPORTS INJURIES Dr.RAJAT JANGIR Consultant Arthroscopy and Sports Injury Ligament and Joints Clinic, Mansarovar, Jaipur MS Ortho (Ahmedabad) Fellow Arthroscopy(S.Korea) Dip Sports Med IOC
  2. 2. Sports for Health
  3. 3. But for some people—particularly those who overdo or who don’t properly train or warm up—these benefits can come at a price: sports injuries.
  4. 4. SPORT INJURIES are those which occur in Athletic activities or while exercising SPORT MEDICINE study and research of injuries in sport in order to prevent or reduce the severity of injury.
  5. 5. EPIDEMOLOGY  Kids ages 5-14 are most likely to hurt themselves on a playground or engaged in "general exercise,”  For ages 15-24, high school and college, team sports become common- basketball, soccer, and football injuries make their main appearance, especially for males  After age 25, those sports become less common and people become more likely to hurt themselves generally working out, running, biking
  6. 6. Knee injuries (55%) >Shoulder> Ankle The most common injuries are  strains or sprains (41%),  broken bones (20%),  bruises or superficial injuries (19%)
  7. 7. India: Data Sparse  Journal of Athletic Enhancement: Prevalence of Sports Injuries in Adolescent Athletes Ieleni Sreekaarini, KMC Manipal
  8. 8. Sports injury pattern in school going children Chandigarh Dr.Ravi Gupta
  9. 9. French gymnast Samir Ait Said snapped his leg during a pommel horse
  10. 10. Australian javelin thrower Kim Mickle dislocated her right shoulder
  11. 11. Ankle Sprain
  12. 12. German Gymnast Adreas TOBA
  13. 13. Acute sports injuries The ‘immediate’ cause may seem obvious  but sports medicine clinicians think beyond the ‘immediate cause’
  14. 14. R Bahr, T Krosshaug
  15. 15. Understanding injury mechanisms: key component of preventing injuries in sport
  16. 16. Acute sports injuries ▪ Acute ankle sprain ▪ Acute knee injury (ACL) ▪ Acute hamstring strain ▪ Acute low back injury
  17. 17. Take home message for causes of ‘acute injuries  The key is to think about the cause…but not just the immediate cause  The ‘upstream’ cause may include  overtraining  suboptimal proprioception/neuromuscular control  regional muscle imbalance  previous injury not full rehabilitated  lack of skill!  impaired eyesight or poor vision
  18. 18. Chronic sports injuries  The ‘immediate’ cause may seem obvious but sports medicine clinicians think beyond the ‘immediate cause’  Chronic’ injuries may be ‘recurrences’ or ‘overuse’ type injuries  They provide an even larger array of ‘upstream causes’
  19. 19. Chronic sports injuries  Stress fracture (of the tibia)  Achilles tendinopathy  Osteoarthritis
  20. 20. Chronic sports injuries Stress fracture • Biomechanics (technique) • Overtraining • Nutrition • Footwear
  21. 21. Chronic sports injuries Tendinopathy • Biomechanics (technique) • Overtraining • Genetics
  22. 22. Chronic sports injuries Osteoarthritis • Previous ACL injury • Obesity • Meniscal surgery • Genetics
  23. 23. Role of Physician  Diagnosis and Treatment  Team Leader  Decision Maker Return to Play  Educator, Advisor  Advocate & Confidant
  24. 24. PREVENTION Primary • Avoidance of injury ( eg- safety helmets) Secondary • Early diagnosis and treatment once the injury has occurred Tertiary • Rehabilitation- to reduce and correct any deformity
  25. 25. PRIMARY PREVENTION-  Warm up  Stretching  Taping and Bracing  Protective Equipment  Suitable Equipment  Environmental factors  Appropriate Training  Psychology  Nutrition
  26. 26.  >100,000 ACL Injuries/Year  NonModifiable: Anatomical Environmental Hormonal  No single risk factor Mandelbaum, B.R., et. al. Effectiveness of neuromuscular and proprioceptive training programin preventing the incidence of ACL injuries in females athletes. AJSM 2005 Griffin, L.Y. et al. Non-contact anterior ligament injuries:risk factors and preventative strategies. J Amer Acad Orthop Surg 2000 ACL INJURY
  27. 27.  70% ACL injuries are non-contact  Most common biomechanical factor straight hips and knees, as well as flat feet during landing.
  28. 28. Injury prevention program focus on  Balance  Eccentric Strength  Proper Mechanics  Flexibility overall reduction of severe ACL injuries from 72 –89%.
  29. 29. Assessment of injuries ABC TOTAPS Treatment of injuries PRICER No HARM Treatment
  30. 30. ABC  Airway  Breathing  Circulation
  31. 31. TOTAPS Talk Observe Touch Active Passive Skills
  32. 32. Initial treatment of injuries PRICER  Protection  Rest  Ice  Compression  Elevation  Referral
  33. 33. Protection  Take player away from field to avoid further injury as soon as possible
  34. 34. Rest  Remove player from field  Rest injured area  Immobilize area  Why?  Reduces further tissue damage  Reduces blood flow  Allows for full assessment of injury
  35. 35. Ice  Ice bag, pack  Ice water bath  15 mins/ 5 times a day  Why?  Cool the area which constricts blood vessels, reduces blood flow and fluid leakage, less swelling, pressures and pain
  36. 36. Compression Compress injured area with Elastic bandage Cohesive bandage Move distal to proximal Why? External pressure reduces fluid leakage and bleeding into tissues Provide support the area
  37. 37. Elevation  Elevate area above height  Why?  Reduces bleeding as blood has to flow up hill  Gravity helps swelling to move towards lymph nodes
  38. 38. No HEAT  Includes  Hot packs  Spas  Saunas  Why?  Increases blood flow to area therefore increases swelling
  39. 39. No ALCOHOL  Includes most things adults enjoy after a game of sports  Why?  Thins blood which increases swelling  Less pain felt therefore more damage caused  Adds toxins to already injured area
  40. 40. No RUNNING  Includes running as well as any exercise that is painful  Why?  Increases in tissue damage  Overload to other area as compensation
  41. 41. No MASSAGE  Rub down  Massage  Mobilizations  Why?  May increases tissue damage  Increases blood circulation to the injured area
  42. 42. Summary  Diverse range of ‘causes’  Understanding ‘cause’ may influence treatment and prevention  No simple way to identify what the relative ‘mix’ of causes is for one particular injury  In clinical practice, think about the range of options and treat
  43. 43. THANK YOU dr.rajatjangir@gmail.com 9461306495

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