Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

User Story Mapping

2,330 views

Published on

Scrum XP è sempre più la metodologia di riferimento per i team e alcuni concetti sono divenuti di uso comune per chiunque operi nel mondo dell’IT (sia piccole realtà sia grandi aziende). Tra questi spiccano termini come user story e Product Backlog.
L’utilizzo delle user story ha sempre più spesso rimpiazzato i tradizionali documenti di specifiche funzionali e gli use case, mentre il Product Backlog è diventato lo strumento per tracciare tutto ciò che riguarda la realizzazione di un Prodotto.
Eppure entrambi hanno una serie di punti deboli. In questo talk mi concentrerò da una parte sulla difficoltà di avere un quadro completo ed evoluto a partire dal Backlog che è aihme piatto e mono dimensionale e dall’altro parlerò di cosa vuol dire veramente avere un approccio iterativo e incrementale nello sviluppo di un sistema.

Published in: Software

User Story Mapping

  1. 1. Rounding  out  your  backlog   Armani  -­‐  Leli   Italian  Agile  Day  2014  
  2. 2. User Story Mapping Why we need a Vision? Vision Board How to create them? Why bother? User Story Learning Outcomes Vision What is a User Story User Story Slicing Why we bother?
  3. 3. Vision Why we need a Vision? Vision Board
  4. 4. Product  Idea   Canvas  as  tools  to  sharing  vision  and  create  the  backlog  
  5. 5. Canvas  as  tools  to  sharing  vision  and  create  the  backlog   Product  Idea   Product Vision board Business Model / Lean Canvas User Story MappingCapture  and   validate  ini9al   assump9on   Capture  and   validate   Business   Model   Capture  and   validate   Product   features   Canvas  as  tools  to  sharing  vision  and  create  the  backlog  Canvas  as  tools  to  sharing  vision  and  create  the  backlog  
  6. 6. Vision Statement Target Group Needs Product Business Value Write  in  one  sentence  the  aim  of  the  product   What  are  the   needs  that  this   product  will   sa=sfy?   List  of  main   features  of  the   product   What  are  the  values   that  this  product  will   generate  for  the   company?     Values  can  be  profit,   market  share,  cost   saving,  improve  KPIs   and  so  on..   Barriers Impediments  to   sa=sfy  these  needs   Impediments  to   reach  these  values   Who is out? List  eventually  who  is   not  the  target   Barriers List  people  who  are   the  target  of  the   product.     People  may  be   cutsomers,  end-­‐users,   internal  users  …  all   stakeholders  that  will   are  impacted  by  the   product.  Use  roles  to   iden=fy  them   Product  Vision  Board    
  7. 7. Il  piu’  grande  online  store  al  mondo   Comprare  online   libri  e  altri  beni     Risparmiare     Avere  una  scelta   completa     Conoscere  i  pareri   di  chi  ha  comprato   la  stessa  cosa     Comprare  senza   recarsi  in  negozio     Scheda  libri  e  altri   beni     Ricerca     Recensioni     Carrello  e   acquisto  on-­‐line   Vendere  mol=  libri  (e   altri  beni)  in  tuTo  il   mondo     Eliminare  i  cos=  fissi  dei   negozi   Consumatori  in  tuTo  il   mondo  con   connessione  a  Internet   e  Carta  di  Credito   Product  Vision  Board  –  Amazon  2005   Vision Statement Target Group Needs Product Business Value
  8. 8. Lets  go  with  our  Vision  Board!!!  
  9. 9. How to create them? Why bother? User Story Mapping
  10. 10. Silent  Brainstorming  
  11. 11. Silent Brainstorming
  12. 12. Silent  Brainstorming   •  Decide  on  the  type  of  ques9on   •  Step  1:  generate  ideas  individually.  One  idea  per  post-­‐it   •  Step  2:  read  and  put  ideas  on  the  table   •  Step  3:  group  the  ideas  (clustering)   •  Step  4:  Name  each  group   •  Step  5:  prepare  for  vo9ng   •  Step  6:  each  person  votes  for  their  top  3   •  Step  7:  facilitator  tallies  the  votes     •  Step  8:  act  on  the  item(s)  with  the  highest  vote!  
  13. 13. Dimensional  Planning  
  14. 14. Dimensional  Planning   •  In  Scrum  the  Product  Backlog  is  an  ordered  list  of   features.  Unfortunately  the  linearity  of  the  ordered  list  is   not  consistent  with  the  way  us  humans  think  about   problems.   •  Problems  even  in  the  business  space  are  mul9-­‐ dimensional.  So,  we  probably  also  should  think  of  solving   our  problems  in  mul9ple  dimensions.  This  is  where   Dimensional  Planning  comes  in  handy  when  spli[ng   Product  Backlog  Items  in  your  Product  Backlog  during  the   Refinement  or  Grooming  mee9ngs.  
  15. 15. Dimensional  Planning   •  In  Scrum  the  Product  Backlog  is  an  ordered  list  of   features.  Unfortunately  the  linearity  of  the  ordered  list  is   not  consistent  with  the  way  us  humans  think  about   problems.   •  Problems  even  in  the  business  space  are  mul9-­‐ dimensional.  So,  we  probably  also  should  think  of  solving   our  problems  in  mul9ple  dimensions.   •  This  is  where  Dimensional  Planning  comes  in  handy   when  spli[ng  Product  Backlog  Items  in  your  Product   Backlog  during  the  Refinement  or  Grooming  mee9ngs.  
  16. 16. Dimensional Planning
  17. 17. Living  Charter  =  Chartering  
  18. 18. How  to  create  a  User  Story  Map  
  19. 19. Activity Task Activity Task Task Task Activity Task Task
  20. 20. Task Task Task Task Task Task
  21. 21. Backbone  
  22. 22. Walking  Skeleton  
  23. 23. Some  defini9on   •  The  post-­‐its  you  create  in  Step  2  are  the  User  Tasks   (blue  post-­‐its  in  the  diagram).     •  The  groups  and  group  names  in  steps  3  and  4  are  the   User  Ac3vi3es  (orange  post-­‐its).  Jeff  calls  these  top   two  rows  the  backbone  and  walking  skeleton  of  your   applica9on.     •  The  user  stories  (yellow  post-­‐its)  are  organized  under   each  User  Task  in  order  of  highest  to  lowest  priority  for   that  User  Task.     •  The  chronological  order  of  how  users  will  typically  use   the  applica9on  goes  lec  to  right  (Time).    
  24. 24. Lets  go  with  our  mapping!!!  
  25. 25. How  to  priori9ze  a  User  Story  Map  
  26. 26. User Stories What is a User Story User Story Slicing
  27. 27. What User Stories are not Tasks •  Create user table •  Create password encryption service •  Create login service •  Create CSS •  Create page template •  Add login button
  28. 28. What User Stories are not A document •  Login.docx •  “this document, by its very size, ensures that it will never be read.” – Sir Winston Churchill
  29. 29. What User Stories are… A small piece of functionality that provides some value to a user •  As a user, I want to login with my password, so that I can gain access to the site. “A place holder for a conversation.”
  30. 30. What User Stories are… I Independent * N Negotiable (can be prioritized) V Valuable (to a user) E Estimable S Small T Testable
  31. 31. Formats By the book: As a [role], I want to [some action], so that [goal] As a [mom] I want to [login with my pwd] so that [I can gain access to the site]
  32. 32. Formats Who What Why As a [mom] I want to [login with my pwd] so that [I can gain access to the site] The “by the book” format is great for learning, but at its core, it is just Who/What/Why
  33. 33. Why   •  It  allows  you  to  see  the  big  picture  in  your   backlog.   •  It  gives  you  a  beder  tool  for  making  decisions   about  grooming  and  priori9zing  your  backlog.     •  It  promotes  silent  brainstorming  and  a   collabora9ve  approach  to  genera9ng  your   user  stories.  
  34. 34. Why   •  It  encourages  an  itera9ve  development   approach  where  your  early  deliveries  validate   your  architecture  and  solu9on.   •  It  is  a  great  visual  alterna9ve  to  tradi9onal   project  plans.   •  It  is  a  useful  model  for  discussing  and   managing  scope.   •  Allows  you  to  visualize  dimensional  planning   and  real  op9ons  for  your  project/product.    
  35. 35. Story  …   Story  1   Story  2   Story  3   SprintN-1 SprintN SprintN+1 Story  3  
  36. 36. Story  Slicing   Story  1   Story  2   Story  3   Story  4   Story  5   Story  6   Story  7   Story  8   Story  9   SprintN-1 SprintN SprintN+1 Wri9ng     story  tests   Automa9ng   story  tests   Implemen9ng   the  user  story  
  37. 37. Risk  &  Assump9ons   •  Where  are  the  risky  stories?   •  Where  are  our  biggest  assump9ons?  
  38. 38. Why slice? User Story Slices go here:
  39. 39. How not to Slice? Tasks •  Create user table •  Create password encryption service •  Create login service •  Create CSS •  Create page template •  Add login button
  40. 40. How to Slice? •  By screen (for basic screens only) •  By button •  By group of fields •  By workflow step •  Optional workflow steps •  Validation •  Error handling * •  Admin functions (maintaining drop downs, etc) •  By priority •  By applying the INVEST model •  By acceptance criteria •  By option •  By role •  By Subjective quality (never by objective quality: always be defect free) •  By value
  41. 41. Other Tips •  Keep them as stories! •  Slice them small when needed, but don’t get silly •  Slice any time •  When you are fighting over your planning poker estimates – slice away. •  Slice more liberally if the story is higher priority
  42. 42. User Tasks User Activities User Stories
  43. 43. Time Priorities Releases
  44. 44. Re-­‐priori3ze  o;en  
  45. 45. How  to  do  it?   1.  Divide  into  groups  of  3-­‐5  people   2.  Start  by  gathering  “things  people  do”  –  the  tasks.  Write  them   down  individually  and  then  read  them  aloud  to  your  group   –  Likely  they  start  with  a  verb.   –  These  are  high  level  user  stories  called  “Tasks”  (walking  skeleton)   –  This  forms  your  story  map  skeleton   3.  Group  them  silently  (simply  because  it  is  faster)   4.  Name  the  groups  and  lay  them  out  in  order  of  9me  (lec  to   right)   –  These  are  called  “User  Ac3vi3es”  (backbone)  
  46. 46. How  to  do  it?   5.  Add  more  detailed  user  stories  below  the  main  tasks   6.  Priori9ze  top  to  bodom   7.  Break  into  releases   8.  Assign  values  
  47. 47. How to do it? smithcdau  (@smithcdau)   11-­‐08-­‐11  2:12  PM   RT  @shanehas9e:  @jeffpadon  if  you're  arguing   about  sequence  it  probably  means  it  doesn't   mader.  #Agile2011  #yam
  48. 48. Our Final Map Group Task Group Task Task Task Group Task Task
  49. 49. thanks  

×