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RV 2015: If You Build It, Will it Flood? Climate Change Vulnerabilities and Strategies by James Allison

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Extreme weather events, flooding and rising sea levels devastate communities, destroy or severely damage costly infrastructure, and introduce a strong element of uncertainty in current and future planning. This new normal spotlights how and where we build new -- or strengthen existing -- infrastructure and communities and the governance systems that manage and regulate these decisions and investments. Hear experts tackle these issues, from Hurricane Sandy to sea level rise in the Bay Area. What are the weak links in terms of existing infrastructure, cross-jurisdictional government response systems and disaster preparedness? Learn about state guidelines and legislation. Discuss how transportation agencies deal with major transit infrastructure challenges. Discover the role of natural systems in protecting critical transit infrastructure

Moderator: Allison Brooks, Executive Director, Bay Area Regional Collaborative, Oakland, California
Eric Fang, AIA, AICP, LEED AP, Associate Principal, EE&K, a Perkins Eastman Company, New York, New York
Projjal Dutta, AIA, LEED AP, Director, Sustainability Initiatives, Metropolitan Transportation Authority, New York, New York
James Allison, Manager of Planning, Capitol Corridor Joint Powers Authority, Oakland, California
JR DeLaRosa, Special Assistant for Climate Change, California Natural Resources Agency, Sacramento, California

Published in: Environment
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RV 2015: If You Build It, Will it Flood? Climate Change Vulnerabilities and Strategies by James Allison

  1. 1. Jim  Allison   Manager  of  Planning  
  2. 2. The  Capitol  Corridor  Service  
  3. 3. Mar2nez,  CA:   Rail  and  the  Larger  Picture…   —  Twenty-­‐two  (22)  round  trip  passenger  trains  through   Martinez   —  Capitol  Corridor  (15  RTs);  San  Joaquin  (5  RTs);  Amtrak   Long  Distance  (2  RTs)     —  Union  Pacific  Railroad  freight  rail  operations  between   Port  of  Oakland  &  Roseville  Yard  &  beyond  go   through  Martinez  
  4. 4. Adapta2on   keeps  the   wheels  on,   but  how  do   WE  adapt?  
  5. 5. Example  Hotspot:  Mar2nez  Sta2on  
  6. 6. Objec2ves   —  Show  vulnerabilities  of  Capitol  Corridor  and  freight   rail  physical  assets  to  specific  climate  change  and  sea   level  rise  scenarios.   —  Detailed  assessment  by  hotspots  along  the  route   —  Martinez  CA  hotspot  to  illustrate  adaptation   challenges  in  a  governance  setting   —  How  can  we  build  the  foundation  for  smart   collaborative  resilience  and  adaptation  projects?  
  7. 7. Physical  Assets   •  Flooded  tracks  and  stations   •  Ballast  damage  and  erosion   •  Damaged  electrical  and   communication  lines   Service  and  O&M   •  Disruption  to  train  service     •  Increased  maintenance   costs   Impacts  on  Capitol  Corridor  
  8. 8. •  Railroad  tracks   •  Railroad  bridges   •  Signal  system   •  Martinez  station   Assets   •  Existing  conditions   •  Physical  characteristics   •  Functional  characteristics   •  Governance/Management   •  Information  availability   •  Consequences   Vulnerability   Metrics   Assessing  Vulnerability  
  9. 9. Climate  Change  Impacts   •  More  frequent  flooding   •  Flooding  lasts  longer   Storm  Events   •  Frequent  or  permanent   inundation   •  Increased  shoreline  erosion  and   wave  over-­‐topping  of  shoreline   protection  (e.g.  levees)   •  Elevated  groundwater  levels  and   salinity   Sea  Level  Rise  
  10. 10. Components  of  Total  Water   Level   Wave   Wind   Barometric  pressure   Tide  difference   Sea  level  rise  
  11. 11. Extreme Tide Level/Storm Surge (in) Sea Level Rise (in) Water Level above MHHW (in) 1-yr 2-yr 5-yr 10-yr 25-yr 50-yr 100- yr +0 0 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 +6 6 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 +12 12 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 +18 18 30 36 42 48 54 60 66 +24 24 36 42 48 54 60 66 72 +30 30 42 48 54 60 66 72 78 +36 36 48 54 60 66 72 78 84 +42 42 54 60 66 72 78 84 90 +48 48 60 66 72 78 84 90 96 +54 54 66 72 78 84 90 96 102 +60 60 72 78 84 90 96 102 108   MHHW:  Mean  Higher  High  Water  –  the  average  of  the  higher  high  2de  water  level  each   day  observed  over  a  Tidal  Datum  Epoch  (19  years)   Permanent   Inunda2on   Temporary  Flooding   2030   2050   2080   2100  
  12. 12. Considering  the  Risks   Current  water  levels;   0  ft  sea  level  rise  
  13. 13. •  1  ft  sea  level  rise;   •  0  ft  slr  +  1-­‐yr  extreme  water  level  (100%  chance  of  occurring  in  a  year)  
  14. 14. •  2  ft  sea  level  rise;   •  1  ft  slr  +  1-­‐yr  extreme  water  level   •  0  ft  slr  +  5-­‐yr  extreme  water  level  (20%  chance  occurring  each  year)  
  15. 15. •  3  ft  sea  level  rise;   •  2  ft  slr  +  1-­‐yr  extreme  water  level       •  1  ft  slr  +  5-­‐yr  extreme  water  level   •  0  ft  slr  +  25-­‐yr  extreme  water  level   (4%  chance  occurring  each  year)  
  16. 16. •  4  ft  sea  level  rise;   •  3  ft  slr  +  1-­‐yr  extreme  water  level     •  2  ft  slr  +  5-­‐yr  extreme  water  level   •  1  ft  slr  +  25-­‐yr  extreme  water  level     •  0  ft  slr  +  100-­‐yr  extreme  water  level   (1%  chance  occurring  each  year)    
  17. 17. •  5  ft  sea  level  rise;   •  4  ft  slr  +  1-­‐yr  extreme  water  level     •  3  ft  slr  +  5-­‐yr  extreme  water  level   •  2  ft  slr  +  25-­‐yr  extreme  water  level     •  1  ft  slr  +  100-­‐yr  extreme  water  level  
  18. 18. Rail  Poten2al  Consequences   —  Flooding  of  bridges  or  of  tracks  will  interrupt  train   operations.   —  Permanent  or  frequent  inundation  of  ballast  and   roadbed  will  damage  the  integrity  of  the  track   structure.   —  Flooding  of  signal  cabinets  and  lights  can  cause   problems  for  the  signal  system  and  result  in  service   interruptions  and  delays  throughout  the  system.   —  Flooding  of  roads  near  the  station  will  cause  problems   for  passengers  and  other  personnel  trying  to  access   the  station  and  boarding  platform.  
  19. 19. Neighboring  Property  Poten2al   Consequences   —  We  don’t  know  them,  what  they  do,  what  they  want   —  Risks,  vulnerability,  and  resiliency  differ  by  asset   —  Do  we  want  to  team  up  with  our  neighbor?   —  How  do  we  equitably  pay  for  the  adaptation?   —  Is  one  adaptation  appropriate  across  asset  types?   —  What  about  the  other  neighbors  around  that  should   participate  in  the  sense  of  fairness?  
  20. 20. Parks  and  Recreation   Refineries  
  21. 21. Long  Linear  Asset  Exposed   —  Linear  asset  in  many  situations   —  Rail  at  the  water’s  edge   —  Rail  in  the  marsh   —  Rail  in  &  amongst  urban  area   —  Neighbors  all  around  with  different  motivations  for   adaptation  solutions  and  financial  capacity   —  Information  followed  by  governance  structure  is  the   largest  gap  
  22. 22. Governance  Collabora2on   —  Consider  route  options  with  future  sea  level  rise  and   flooding  risks  in  mind.   —  Need  to  develop  local  and  regional  partnerships  to   approach  adaptation  projects  collaboratively.  
  23. 23. How  WE  adapt  ma]ers  
  24. 24. Thank  you   Jim  Allison   Manager  of  Planning   Capitol  Corridor  Joint  Powers  Authority   —  jima@capitolcorridor.org   —  510-­‐464-­‐6994   http://www.adaptingtorisingtides.org/  

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