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Partnering for Success 
Building the Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail Transit Project 
1
Partnering for Success 
• How can partnering between transit 
agencies and local government 
facilitate project constructi...
A Regional Rail System 
3
Portland-Milwaukie 
Light Rail 
7.3 miles 
10 stations 
Opens September 12, 2015 
4
Federal New Starts 
State Lottery Bonds 
Metro 
ODOT 
TriMet 
City of Milwaukie 
City of Portland 
$745,200,000 
New Start...
Building Infrastructure 
• Roadway Pavement 
• Curbs, Sidewalks, Curb Ramps 
• Traffic Signals 
• Street Lights 
• Water M...
1. Project Staffing IGAs 
Light rail project pays for City 
staff time 
• Involved in decision-making 
• Bring expertise t...
2. Transfer Permit Authority 
Streamlining permitting and 
inspections where it makes sense 
Assign permit responsibilitie...
3. Local Betterments 
Incorporating opportunities 
Link light rail construction 
to facilitate other projects 
in the City...
4. O&M Agreements 
Understanding long-term 
operations and maintenance needs 
for all parties 
• Document assumptions made...
5. Embedded Staff 
City staff are part of project team 
• City staff, TriMet staff and 
Contractor co-locate in 
construct...
Partnering for Success 
• How can partnering between transit 
agencies and local government 
facilitate project constructi...
Partnering for Success 
• Significant public infrastructure 
investment beyond the trackway 
• Cities have a vested intere...
Thank you. 
Jean Senechal Biggs, ASLA 
Project Manager 
Portland Bureau of Transportation 
jean.senechalbiggs@portlandoreg...
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RV 2014: Delivering Complex Projects: The Coordination Component by Jean Seneschal Biggs

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Delivering Complex Projects: The Coordination Component

Urban transit projects -- with their linear nature -- involve multiple jurisdictions, neighborhoods and private sector interests. Effectively moving projects through construction and operations requires considerable coordination and collaboration, particularly in today's financially constrained, politically-charged climate. Getting it right can mean the difference between waiting an entire generation to open your next major transit project. Learn the key strategies and methods behind three successfully implemented projects -- in Minneapolis; Charlotte; and Portland. Hear three perspectives from an owner/operator, from the key local partner jurisdiction and from the regional/political point of view. Strategies and specific components of cross-jurisdictional coordination? Creative problem-solving techniques? You'll get it all here!

Moderator: Shellie Ginn, Administrator, Department of Transportation, City of Tucson, Arizona
Andrew Mock, Assistant Project Manager, Charlotte Area Transit System, Charlotte, North Carolina
Jim McDonough, Chair, Ramsey County Board of Commissioners, St. Paul, Minnesota
Jean Senechal Biggs, Project Manager, Bureau of Transportation, City of Portland, Oreg

Published in: Business
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RV 2014: Delivering Complex Projects: The Coordination Component by Jean Seneschal Biggs

  1. 1. Partnering for Success Building the Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail Transit Project 1
  2. 2. Partnering for Success • How can partnering between transit agencies and local government facilitate project construction beyond permitting and inspection? • When cities contribute matching funds, how can they ensure a successful outcome of their project investment? 2
  3. 3. A Regional Rail System 3
  4. 4. Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail 7.3 miles 10 stations Opens September 12, 2015 4
  5. 5. Federal New Starts State Lottery Bonds Metro ODOT TriMet City of Milwaukie City of Portland $745,200,000 New Starts Clackamas County Nature in Neighborhood Grant OHSU In-Kind Property ZRZ In-kind Property PCC In-Kind Property $55M City of PSU In-Kind Property Portland Willamette Shore Line In-Kind Project costs ~$1.49 billion Property Local Interest Costs Project Funding 5
  6. 6. Building Infrastructure • Roadway Pavement • Curbs, Sidewalks, Curb Ramps • Traffic Signals • Street Lights • Water Mains • Sewers, Inlets • Stormwater Planters, Swales • Signs, Pavement Markings • Bike Lanes, Cycle Tracks, Racks • Street Trees • Roadside Landscapes 6
  7. 7. 1. Project Staffing IGAs Light rail project pays for City staff time • Involved in decision-making • Bring expertise to the team • Support the project beyond basic permitting: ‘shepherd’ the project through completion 7 Traffic signal activation
  8. 8. 2. Transfer Permit Authority Streamlining permitting and inspections where it makes sense Assign permit responsibilities based on type of facility regardless of underlying land: • TriMet-owned private property • Public right of way 8 Memorandum of Understanding
  9. 9. 3. Local Betterments Incorporating opportunities Link light rail construction to facilitate other projects in the City’s Capital Improvement Program Portland Streetcar Close the Loop 9
  10. 10. 4. O&M Agreements Understanding long-term operations and maintenance needs for all parties • Document assumptions made during preliminary engineering • City and TriMet maintenance staff share their practical knowledge from the field 10 Interagency Agreement Exhibits
  11. 11. 5. Embedded Staff City staff are part of project team • City staff, TriMet staff and Contractor co-locate in construction field office • Facilitates communication, coordination and team-building • Time-critical decision-making to keep the project moving 11 East Segment Field Office
  12. 12. Partnering for Success • How can partnering between transit agencies and local government facilitate project construction beyond permitting and inspection? • When cities contribute matching funds, how can they ensure a successful outcome of their project investment? 12
  13. 13. Partnering for Success • Significant public infrastructure investment beyond the trackway • Cities have a vested interest • Partnering creates a collaborative spirit between agencies 13
  14. 14. Thank you. Jean Senechal Biggs, ASLA Project Manager Portland Bureau of Transportation jean.senechalbiggs@portlandoregon.gov www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation 14

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