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RV 2014: Performance Measures People can Actually Understand by Hal R. Johnson AICP

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Performance Measurements People can Actually Understand

How can we measure and make the case for streetcar, light rail and bus rapid transit in an understandable way? How can we use the results to inform the elected officials who are held accountable for transportation decisions? The New Starts Criteria, often used to evaluate projects, can be complicated and confusing to the public. Learn techniques to describe project benefits in line with the values of citizens and elected officials. Hear how California is replacing traditional level-of-service analysis with metrics aligned with environmental goals. Will it lead to more sustainable transportation options and healthier communities, instead of roadway solutions? Come along and find out!

Moderator: Zakhary Mallett, Director, District 7, San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District, Oakland, California
Kevin Bacon, Urban Designer, Perkins+Will, Atlanta, Georgia
Amanda Eaken, Deputy Director, Sustainable Communities, Energy & Transportation Program, Natural Resources Defense Council, San Francisco, California
Hal R. Johnson, AICP, Manager of Project Development, Utah Transit Authority, Salt Lake City, Utah
Chris Quinn, Project Manager, Regional Transportation District, Denver, Colorado

Published in: Data & Analytics
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RV 2014: Performance Measures People can Actually Understand by Hal R. Johnson AICP

  1. 1. Photo courtesy of County Lemonade via Flickr. University TRAX Line Benefits: Can transit reduce congestion? Hal Ryan Johnson, AICP CTP, PTP Integrated Project Development Manager, UTA September 2014
  2. 2. UTA’s Rail System Map Study Area
  3. 3. Beyond the Numbers: University Case Study • The University Line opened in December 2001 • The Medical Center Extension opened in September 2003
  4. 4. Increased Mode Share • Since 1991, transit ridership to campus increased from 1,500 per day to more than 10,000 per day. • 21 percent of University of Utah students reported that in 2002, their primary mode of travel was UTA. This number increased to 37 percent just three years later. • Between 2001 and 2006, ridership on the campus shuttle increased by 50 percent.
  5. 5. Benefits - Parking 30% reduction in parking demand on campus: • In the fall of 2001, there were approximately 10,000 total parking spaces on campus. These were at 96 percent capacity during peak periods. • Since the implementation of light rail, there are still approximately 10,000 parking spaces on campus, but the number of vacant spaces has increased to more than 3,000, or approximately 70 percent capacity.
  6. 6. Benefits - Traffic Analysis of the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) traffic count data has shown that traffic to the University of Utah has stabilized at the levels seen in the 1980s. Photo Credit: http://www.ehow.com
  7. 7. Average Daily Traffic and TRAX and Bus Ridership on 400/500 South Source: Effect of Light Rail Transit on Traffic in a Travel Corridor Final Report; NITC-RR-611; Reid Ewing, PhD, Guang Tian, Allison Spain; for National Institute for Transportation and Communities; June 2014
  8. 8. Effect of TRAX on 400/500 South AADT on 400 South Net Transit Ridership Δ1 ‐9,300 7,200 Δ2 -17,900 7,100 Δ3 -10,100 12,800 Δ4 -18,700 12,000 Source: Effect of Light Rail Transit on Traffic in a Travel Corridor Final Report; NITC-RR-611; Reid Ewing, PhD, Guang Tian, Allison Spain; for National Institute for Transportation and Communities; June 2014
  9. 9. AADT on Streets Parallel to TRAX Source: Effect of Light Rail Transit on Traffic in a Travel Corridor Final Report; NITC-RR-611; Reid Ewing, PhD, Guang Tian, Allison Spain; for National Institute for Transportation and Communities; June 2014
  10. 10. Changes of Building Floor Area by Land- Use Type Between 1999 and 2009 for Parcels that Changed 1999 2009 Changes Residential 48,300 794,000 745,800 Commercial 1,712,200 4,870,500 3,158,400 Public 10,854,100 13,445,000 2,590,900 Other (e.g., parking lots 46,800 3,500 -43,400 Total building square footage 12,661,400 19,113,000 6,451,700 Source: Effect of Light Rail Transit on Traffic in a Travel Corridor Final Report; NITC-RR-611; Reid Ewing, PhD, Guang Tian, Allison Spain; for National Institute for Transportation and Communities; June 2014
  11. 11. Total Trip Generation by Land Use 1999 2009 Changes Residential 77,000 86,200 9,200 Commercial 834,500 861,000 26,500 Source: Effect of Light Rail Transit on Traffic in a Travel Corridor Final Report; NITC-RR-611; Reid Ewing, PhD, Guang Tian, Allison Spain; for National Institute for Transportation and Communities; June 2014
  12. 12. Estimates of Traffic Reduction on 400/500 South Due to TRAX Average Daily Traffic Reduction Δ1 9,300 Δ2 17,900 Δ3 10,100 Δ4 18,700 Δ5 7,300 Δ6 21,700 Source: Effect of Light Rail Transit on Traffic in a Travel Corridor Final Report; NITC-RR-611; Reid Ewing, PhD, Guang Tian, Allison Spain; for National Institute for Transportation and Communities; June 2014
  13. 13. VMT and Fuel Prices Source: Brookings
  14. 14. New Development Along the University Line
  15. 15. Economic Redevelopment Along Transit Lines
  16. 16. Economic Redevelopment Along University TRAX - Downtown
  17. 17. Economic Redevelopment Along University TRAX – at the University
  18. 18. U of U Campus Redevelopment
  19. 19. University of Utah Photo Credit: http://www.deseretnews.com
  20. 20. Transit Success Story • INCREASED TRANSIT RIDERSHIP: Over one third of the total campus population, or over 10,000 people, arrive every day by either bus or rail. • REDUCED PARKING ON CAMPUS: High transit ridership has enabled the University to repurpose parking stalls • REDUCED REGIONAL TRAFFIC: There has been a huge shift to walking and biking • INCREASED ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: $1.7 B in new economic development has occurred
  21. 21. Mode Choice: Walking Photo courtesy of Vix B via everystockphoto.com.

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