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923 2 wheeler_public privat partnerships

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Public-Private Partnerships: The P3 Experience AICP CM 1.5
Public-private partnerships (P3s) are on the upswing. After a strong start with vertical building delivery in the US and many transit projects in Canada, the P3 model for transit seems to be here to stay. Upcoming projects in Baltimore and Denver are piquing interest across the US. Is P3 right for your project? How have recent projects fared? Listen as panel members explore recent applications, trends and benefits of the P3 delivery method. Learn how to assess your own project in terms of the P3 model. Hear how P3 is helping accomplish broader community development, sustainability and mobility goals throughout North America.
Moderator: Bob Post, Vice President, Director of Transportation, URS, Portland, Oregon
Charles Wheeler, Senior Project Manager, URS, Richmond Hill, Ontario
Gregory P. Benz, RA, AICP, Senior Vice President, Principal, Professional Associate, Parsons Brinckerhoff, Baltimore, Maryland
Martin Nielsen, MAIBC, LEED AP, MRAIC, P.Eng., Principal, Dialog Design, Vancouver, British Columbia

Published in: Leadership & Management
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923 2 wheeler_public privat partnerships

  1. 1. OTTAWA LRT PROJECT DESIGN / PROCUREMENT / CITY CHALLENGES AND STRATEGIES Rail Implementation Office
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION  OLRT project is largest infrastructure project in City’s history since the Rideau Canal in 1840’s  $2.1 P3 DB project awarded to Rideau Transit Group (RTG) in February 2013  12.5 km, 13 station line extends from Blair to Tunney’s Pasture  2.5 km tunnel, 3 underground stations in the downtown core, each with 2 street level entrances  New maintenance and storage facility (MSF)  Conversion of a successful BRT to LRT a first in North America? 2
  3. 3. 3 PROJECT OVERVIEW Procurement Approach MSF Stations Vehicle Integrated Entrances Tunnel DESIGN BUILD FINANCE MAINTAIN
  4. 4. THE CONFEDERATION LINE 4 ` Maintenance and Storage Facility Pimisi Lyon Parliament Tunney’s uOttawa Tremblay
  5. 5. 5 WHY LRT?
  6. 6. PROJECT CHALLENGES  City Council objectives:  “On time, on budget, fixed price” (Mayor)  Full risk transfer for geotechnical / tunnel risks  Shorten procurement process by 12 months 6
  7. 7. PROJECT CHALLENGES  Protect existing transit operations / OC operating budget:  Peak point demand of 9,300 pphpd in downtown core  Canada’s 150th Anniversary on July 2017  “Service proven” vehicle capable of operating in Ottawa climate 7
  8. 8. PROJECT CHALLENGES  High quality architectural design in keeping with Nations Capital  TOD interest is “off the scale”  OC to operate, proponent to design, build,finance and maintain for 30 year concession period  How did we address major challenges? 8
  9. 9. PROJECT STRATEGIES 9 A) Capital Costs / Risk Transfer  $300M in invested capital by consortium  Penalties for not providing specified service levels/quality tied to capital and maintenance payments  Encourages high quality design / construction as capital is at risk for 30 years  Allow proponents to select milestone payments from defined list
  10. 10. PROJECT STRATEGIES 10 B) Project Readiness Date / Milestone  Ensures major downtown construction finished by Canada Day 2017  A “required” milestone / well defined scope completion
  11. 11. PROJECT STRATEGIES 11 C) Define Service Proven Vehicle / Systems  Ensure compliance during bidding process Service Proven Vehicle means a Vehicle that is substantially compliant with the following characteristics: 1) The major vehicle sub system (including trucks, braking systems, propulsion systems, articulation joints), have been integrated in a comparable LRV currently in revenue service; and 2) A minimum of 10 of these vehicles have been in Revenue Service for a minimum of two years; and 3) Have been operated in similar climatic conditions and service conditions to those specified for the OLRT project; and 4) Have authority data confirming that the Vehicle has attained a minimum “in-service” MDBF of 50,000 km. Failures are defined as malfunctions that cause Revenue Service delays of 4 minutes or more.
  12. 12. PROJECT STRATEGIES 12 D) Mobility Matters (MM), Energy Matters (EM), & Operations Matters (OM)  Built into procurement / evaluation process to drive long term proponent behaviour  Add on to NPV of bids for evaluation purposes  “Pain share” / “Gain share” if targets not met
  13. 13. DESIGN AND PROCUREMENT STRATEGIES 13 DESIGN BUILD FINANCE MAINTAIN A) Geotechnical Risk Transfer  Evaluation of bids “geared” towards proponents taking cost / schedule risk for tunnelling / geotechnical conditions  Extensive geotechnical data provided to proponents  No geotechnical baseline report  Financial bid incentives were varied by extent of risk transfer
  14. 14. DESIGN AND PROCUREMENT STRATEGIES 14 DESIGN BUILD FINANCE MAINTAIN B) Affordability Cap  An important “gate” in the procurement bid evaluation  Bids need to be under the cap in order to maximize financial adjustment to bid price  An incentive to minimize capital costs of bid in order to win financial evaluation
  15. 15. DESIGN AND PROCUREMENT STRATEGIES 15 DESIGN BUILD FINANCE MAINTAIN C) Defined Alignment Envelope  Allows all potential construction methods  Lower limits for downtown station platforms
  16. 16. 16
  17. 17. DESIGN AND PROCUREMENT STRATEGIES 17 DESIGN BUILD FINANCE MAINTAIN D) Defined Alignment Envelope Downtown alignment under Canal defined by City as a requirement Horizontal / Vertical alignment limits to drive drive shallow tunnel
  18. 18. DESIGN AND PROCUREMENT STRATEGIES 18 DESIGN BUILD FINANCE MAINTAIN E) Defined “Station Innovation zones”  Platform can be between “x” and “y”  Minimum platform separation of “z”
  19. 19. DESIGN AND PROCUREMENT STRATEGIES 19 DESIGN BUILD FINANCE MAINTAIN F) Integrated Station Entrances Procurement requirements:  Two station entrances shall be integrated  Other opportunities for ISE’s identified but up to proponents After preferred proponent selected:  Additional ISE’s negotiated with RTG / property owners (3 ISE’s)  Incorporated into contract at financial close End result: 5 of 6 underground station entrances are integrated from start of revenue service A significant project accomplishment!
  20. 20. DESIGN AND PROCUREMENT STRATEGIES 20 DESIGN BUILD FINANCE MAINTAIN G) Station are Community Landmarks  Simple attractive designs  Eye-catching architectural themes throughout  Inviting & safe public spaces  Intuitive passenger flows  Integrated pedestrian pathways / MUPS
  21. 21. PLANNING’S TOD STUDIES 21 Chris Brouwer and team
  22. 22. TOD STUDY AREA BOUNDARIES 22
  23. 23. TOD STUDY – TREMBLAY STATION - PLAN AREA 23
  24. 24. TOD STUDY – TREMBLAY STATION - PEDESTRIAN 24
  25. 25. TOD STUDY – TREMBLAY STATION - BICYCLE 25
  26. 26. TOD STUDY – TREMBLAY STATION - STREETS 26
  27. 27. TOD STUDY – TREMBLAY STATION – GREEN PLAN 27
  28. 28. TOD STUDY – TREMBLAY STATION – LAND USE 28
  29. 29. TOD STUDY – TREMBLAY STATION – DENSITY 29
  30. 30. 30 TOD STUDY – TREMBLAY STATION – TIMING
  31. 31. RESULT OF CITY DESIGN AND SOUND PROCUREMENT STRATEGIES 31
  32. 32. RESULT OF CITY DESIGN AND SOUND PROCUREMENT STRATEGIES 32
  33. 33. From this… 33 Queen looking west from O’Connor
  34. 34. … to this! 34
  35. 35. From this… 35 MacKenzie King Bridge looking NW
  36. 36. … to this! 36
  37. 37. 37 Thank you
  38. 38. end 38 Charles Wheeler Project Manager - Capital Transit Partners (URS) Lead - Integrated Station Entrances Light Rail Design + Construction Rail Implementation Office City Of Ottawa Charles.wheeler@urs.com Cell: 613-883-0896 Tel: 613-580-2424, ext 16559/Fax: 613-580-9688

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