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Adult Caregiving:
Information,
Advice and
Support

Brought to You by
SecureHorizons and
Right at Home®
Contents

        1.   Who is an “Adult Caregiver”? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ....
What is an “Adult Caregiver”?

An Adult Caregiver refers to an adult who provides assistance
to anyone who is physically o...
The Growing Impact
    of Adult Caregiving

        A woman writes: “My
        husband’s 85-year-old
        mother lives...
How Prevalent is the
                                  Adult Caregiving Issue?

Statistically Speaking:                   ...
Advice for Adult Caregivers

        Adult Caregivers should have a plan in place to avoid the
        pitfalls and burnou...
React
                      » Plan ahead to take
                        action when warning
                        signs...
Resources and Options
    Available to Adult Caregivers

         Making the choice to provide informal care is a brave an...
Another option is hiring additional paid
help to supplement caregiving needs. A
paid caregiver can be hired to work in
wha...
Seven Important Questions
     to Ask When Hiring Paid Help



            Answering these questions may be less of a prio...
Orienting Your Paid Caregivers

Whether you hire a private caregiver, a        Also, show the home care worker:
home care ...
Powers of Attorney
     Making Health Care and Financial Decisions
     in Accordance with a Client’s Choices



         ...
A Health Care Power                             Further, a health care power of attorney
   of Attorney                   ...
Next Steps

         Several simple steps will help families make educated
         decisions when Adult Caregiving needs ...
Frequently Asked Questions

Are the caregivers I hire bonded              Ask about training, screening and
& insured?    ...
Frequently Asked Questions

                     If I change my mind, do I have to             How can I verify a shift wa...
Do I need a physician’s                        Many services also utilize formally-trained
authorization/prescription?    ...
Adult Caregiving Resource Links

         Caregiving Education                          Family Caregiver Alliance
        ...
National Association of                        National Private Duty Association
Professional Geriatric                   ...
Adult Caregiving Resource Links

         Disease-Specific                             American Lung Association
         I...
American Society on Aging                       National Council on Aging
Our resources, publications and educational     ...
An Adult Caregiver’s
     Home Safety Checklist

         All Rooms:
           No loose carpeting or rugs that do not hav...
Bedroom:
  Bedside table with non-tip lamp and room for eyeglasses.

  Clear traffic area from bedroom to bathroom.

  Comf...
An Adult Caregiver’s
     Needs Assessment
     Worksheet                                                   This worksheet...
Conditions/Functional Status
How do the following affect the person’s ability to function?
Limitation                     ...
An Adult Caregiver’s
     Needs Assessment Worksheet

         Environmental Safety
         Which barriers can be removed...
Floors:                                Limitation         No Problem   Needs to be changed
Nonskid level surfaces
Nonglare...
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Minnetonka, MN 55343

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Adult Caregiving Show Me Guide

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Adult Caregiving Show Me Guide

  1. 1. Adult Caregiving: Information, Advice and Support Brought to You by SecureHorizons and Right at Home®
  2. 2. Contents 1. Who is an “Adult Caregiver”? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2. The Growing Impact of Adult Caregiving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3. Advice for Adult Caregivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4. Resources and Options Available to Adult Caregivers . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 5. Making Health Care and Financial Decisions According . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 to a Client’s Choices – Powers of Attorney 6. Next Steps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 7. Frequently Asked Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 8. Addendum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 a. Resource Links for Adult Caregiving b. An Adult Caregiver’s Home Safety Checklist c. An Adult Caregiver’s Needs Assessment Worksheet 2
  3. 3. What is an “Adult Caregiver”? An Adult Caregiver refers to an adult who provides assistance to anyone who is physically or cognitively impaired. This assistance can vary by circumstance and includes anything from helping with bathing and personal hygiene tasks to running errands or grocery shopping. Whether someone actually provides such assistance themselves, or coordinates the services of others who provide the assistance, they are considered an Adult Caregiver. Examples of Adult Caregiving include No matter which of these caregiving caring for a spouse who has suffered situations you may be in, you should from a physically-limiting event or understand that you are not alone situation, such as arthritis, a stroke or a — millions of Americans are Adult heart attack. It can also entail caring for Caregivers. If you are feeling a parent or other loved one with a physically or emotionally overwhelmed, cognitively limiting condition such this is a very normal reaction and there as Alzheimer’s Disease or for a child with is help available. traumatic brain injury from a car accident. The guide that follows is a good starting Informal caregiver and family caregiver are point when gathering advice and resources terms that refer to unpaid individuals such for Adult Caregiving. as family members, friends and neighbors who provide care. These individuals may live with the person being cared for or live YOU ARE NOT ALONE AS AN across the country. Formal caregivers are ADULT CAREGIVER. volunteers or paid care providers associated with an organization such as The National Family Caregiver a home care agency. Association estimates that 1 in 4 adults provide care to another adult. 3
  4. 4. The Growing Impact of Adult Caregiving A woman writes: “My husband’s 85-year-old mother lives more than 150 miles away. She is growing frail, and we worry about her a lot. She will not consider moving closer to us, she wants to stay in her house of 60 years, and we THE GROWTH IN ADULT CAREGIVING don’t blame her…we are really feeling a heavy weight The convergence of three demographic trends explains this of responsibility. We are at growth in elderly caregiving: a loss in knowing how to 1. The Baby Boomers are approach this whole issue.” aging, and their parents are living longer. Her situation communicates the essence of 2. Women – the traditional caregivers – are in the why Adult Caregiving has become such an workplace and not available important consideration in today’s society. to provide daily care. The segment of Adult Caregivers that is 3. Our mobile society has left growing most rapidly today is comprised families separated, sometimes of those who provide care to the elderly. by thousands of miles. 4
  5. 5. How Prevalent is the Adult Caregiving Issue? Statistically Speaking: Economic Effects: • The strain of providing care for an • If the services provided by informal elderly loved one is an everyday reality caregivers (i.e. family, friends, neighbors) for an estimated 25 percent of had to be replaced with paid services, it American families. Again, if you are would cost an estimated $257 billion. an Adult Caregiver, you are not alone. • A recent study found that the • 52 million informal and family cost to U.S. business due to lost caregivers provide care to someone productivity of working Adult aged 20+ who is ill or disabled. Caregivers (absenteeism, workday • 34 million adults (16% of population) interruptions, early retirement, etc) provide care to adults 50+ years. ranges from $17.1 billion to $33.6 billion per year. It’s not just the Adult • Unpaid family caregivers are estimated Caregiver who is affected by their to reach 37 million caregivers by 2050, caregiving responsibilities, but their an increase of 85% from 2000. employers, supervisors, co-workers, and colleagues as well. Mental and • As a result of their caregiving, informal Emotional Effects: caregivers are estimated to each lose • Studies consistently report higher levels an average of $25,494 in Social of depressive symptoms (20% to 50% Security benefits, an average of of Adult Caregivers) and mental health $67,202 in pension benefits and an problems among caregivers than among average of $566,433 in wage wealth. their non-caregiving peers. In short, it • Long-distance caregivers spend an is normal to feel overwhelmed by Adult average of $392/month on travel and Caregiving responsibilities. out-of-pocket expenses as part of their • Several studies have shown that caregiving duties. caregivers use prescription and psychotropic drugs more than non-caregivers. 5
  6. 6. Advice for Adult Caregivers Adult Caregivers should have a plan in place to avoid the pitfalls and burnout that are common to people in this position. Many informal caregivers tend to ignore or put aside their own needs, which can be detrimental to themselves and the individual for whom they are caregiving. Tips to Avoid What are some warning Caregiver Burnout signs that my loved • A few hours per week of ‘down time’ one’s caregiving needs can make a world of difference. See a are changing? counselor or make a point of scheduling • Changing relationships with others/ time out of the house with a friend. withdrawal from social interactions. • Monitor your health. Stress and • Unusual behavior, such as being overly inadequate sleep can take a negative quiet, loud or agitated. toll on an Adult Caregiver’s physical • Neglecting personal care, including and mental well-being. hygiene and nutrition. • Stay connected to others. Providing • Signs of forgetfulness such as piles care for someone can lead to a sense of newspapers, unopened mail and of isolation. scorched pans. • Attend caregiver support • Mismanaging finances, not paying bills group meetings. or making unusual purchases. • Not keeping up with household chores. 6
  7. 7. React » Plan ahead to take action when warning signs appear. What can Adult Caregivers do when warning signs appear? » Caregivers should attend to their • Do not be afraid to seek or accept own needs. assistance. There are many free or economical public and private services Avoid for Adult Caregivers seeking a respite from providing continuous care. Burnout • Talk with your loved one to find out what they need and what will accept. • During your visits, watch for warning signs of declining abilities, Warning such as changes in grooming, eating, or social activities. Signs • If you notice what appears to be a » Watch for warning decline in thinking and reasoning, you signs that your might want to ask a physician to “test” loved one’s needs your loved one for cognitive function. are changing. • Buy a workbook to organize information. Keep track of your loved one’s medical condition and prescription drug information. • Establish a network of support (friends, relatives, neighbors, and physicians), and keep in touch. 7
  8. 8. Resources and Options Available to Adult Caregivers Making the choice to provide informal care is a brave and difficult decision for many American families, but they don’t have to go it alone. There are ample resources available in many communities to guide and assist these families who undertake the task of providing care to an elderly or disabled loved-one. If I want to care for my loved one in the home, what are my options? First of all, it’s important to know what However, many other financial vehicles financial resources may be available to pay are available that will pay for ongoing for those services that Informal Family caregiving services: Caregivers usually provide. Medicare, • Long-Term Care Insurance Medicaid and most employer-sponsored • Worker’s Compensation and HMO and PPO plans reimburse only Catastrophic Auto Insurance policies. for intermittent visits from a home care nurse on a temporary basis, when a • Reverse Mortgage Funds patient has a specific qualifying medical • Employer Sponsored Health Savings diagnosis. In general, these types of Accounts or Flexible Spending Accounts. insurance are not designed to pay for • Employer-Sponsored caregiving stipends ongoing, hourly caregiving services that – such as “Back-Up Care” programs for are classified as “Long-Term Care.” Use employees who are Adult Caregivers and the Official Medicare Eligibility Tool at travel for work www.medicare.gov/LongTermCare/Static/ • Family Trust Funds Medicare.asp to learn more. • State-subsidized Home and Community Based Services (“Medicaid Waiver”) programs. Age and income qualifications do apply 8
  9. 9. Another option is hiring additional paid help to supplement caregiving needs. A paid caregiver can be hired to work in whatever setting a care recipient may Caregiver Tip: Adult day care call home: their own private residence, centers provide daytime respite a senior retirement community, a group services for working Adult home, or a rehabilitation facility. Caregivers during weekdays. Hiring a private in-home caregiver is one possibility. A trusted family member, friend or neighbor may be a cost-effective option. Bear in mind that you are assuming employer responsibilities when hiring privately, and most homeowners insurance policies exclude injury to privately-hired caregivers. Many Adult Caregivers engage the services of a private duty home care agency to provide services to a loved-one when more services are needed than a privately-hired caregiver can be expected to provide. Home care agencies should be willing to provide proof of background checks, any required licensing, bonded and insured caregiving staff, formal training programs for staff, and 24-hour emergency scheduling services. The National Private Duty Association is a good source of home care agency resources: www.privatedutyhomecare.org. Finally, adult day care centers provide daytime respite services for working Adult Caregivers during weekdays. 9
  10. 10. Seven Important Questions to Ask When Hiring Paid Help Answering these questions may be less of a priority if a trusted friend or family member is available. If this option is not available, as is the case for millions of Adult Caregivers, it is important for the family to ask these questions. 1. If the hired caregiver becomes ill or 5. Are criminal history background otherwise unavailable, what alternate checks, state abuse registries arrangements can be made? checks and prior work reference 2. Are social security, federal and checks completed? state taxes, and unemployment 6. Is there bonding and insurance in insurance paid so the family is not place that would cover any injury to legally responsible? the client or theft? 3. Do we have verification that the paid 7. Assuming family is not available to caregivers can legally work in the U.S.? supervise paid caregivers at all times, 4. If the hired caregiver is injured, who will there be documentation that is responsible? Remember that many substantiates the completion of services? homeowner’s insurance policies exclude such injuries via “domestic employee exclusions.” Caregiver Tip: If the Adult Caregiver does not have the time and/or resources available to answer these important questions, the services of a professional home care agency or adult day care center — who should take responsibility for the items above as part of their fee — may be the right solution. 10
  11. 11. Orienting Your Paid Caregivers Whether you hire a private caregiver, a Also, show the home care worker: home care agency or an adult day care • Likes and dislikes of the care recipient center, letting them see what a typical • Dietary needs day in the life of your loved-one is like is helpful-not only for the caregiver, but for • Mobility issues the recipient of that care. Everyone will • Medications: dosage and how to order be more comfortable and it will make • How to deal with individual behavior/ adjusting to someone in the house easier. emotional problems It’s probably best to put things in writing, And remember, ask lots of questions of but also take the time to spend the day the caregiver/agency in order to assure and go through the routine. Acquaint the everyone is clear! workers with who to contact in the case of an emergency, where supplies are (medical, clothing, cooking, cleaning), where the appliances are and how to use them, and keys and alarm systems. 11
  12. 12. Powers of Attorney Making Health Care and Financial Decisions in Accordance with a Client’s Choices Powers of attorney are a good planning tool to create a way for an Adult Caregiver to act on behalf of another during a period of incapacity or, in the management of finances, whenever an individual might find it convenient to delegate financial responsibilities. While terms and formats differ somewhat from one state to another, there are typically two types of powers of attorney, one for the management of finances, and one for the management of health care. 12
  13. 13. A Health Care Power Further, a health care power of attorney of Attorney may state an individual’s instructions Health care power of attorney becomes regarding life support issues (CPR, active only when an individual is so ill that ventilators or respirators and tube or he or she cannot make or communicate intravenous feedings and hydration) if he a health care decision to his or her or she becomes terminally ill. More than physicians. For example, if Mr. Jones is in one agent can be named, typically giv- a coma, or if he develops dementia, which ing an order in which the agents are to be impairs his understanding and judgment, contacted. For example, Mr. Jones might the agent nominated by Mr. Jones in his make his son who lives in town his pri- health care power of attorney has the mary health care agent, but could name authority to make health care decisions for his out-of-state daughter as a second agent Mr. Jones. should physicians be unable to locate the son in an emergency. Do not assume that family members automatically have the right to make A Financial Power these types of decisions. Most state laws of Attorney are quite vague on who is permitted to Financial power of attorney allows an make medical decisions for another; a individual to nominate one or more valid power of attorney clarifies the trusted individuals who can manage decision-maker for physicians. legal or financial matters. The powers are typically active once the power of attorney is executed, so the individual and agent both have access to the individual’s finances. They share authority to manage the finances, but they do not share ownership of the assets. Financial powers of attorney may Caregiver Tip: To learn use simple state-approved “short forms” more about powers of or may state in lengthy text the exact attorney, contact an elder law attorney in your area powers being granted; both types have through the National their purposes. Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (www.naela.org) to discuss your needs and concerns. 13
  14. 14. Next Steps Several simple steps will help families make educated decisions when Adult Caregiving needs arise: 1. Arrange a meeting for all involved 3. Check with your employer’s human family and loved ones to discuss options. resources department and/or employee Be sure to include the wishes of the care assistance program. A recent report from recipient. Discussion items may include the Society for Human Resource matching the appropriate caregiver, Management indicates that about 1 in 4 daily routines health, nutritional and companies offer basic elder care provisions medication requirements as well as house to employees, such as referrals to caregivers cleaning and transportation needs. The or legal services. About 1 in 11 companies Adult Caregiver’s Needs Assessment offer more elder care services, including Worksheet included with this Show Me financial assistance with in-home care and Guide is a helpful tool when determining extended leaves for emergencies. And don’t these needs. forget to check with your spouse/partner’s employer as well! 2. Gather local community resources, via the Internet or local phone books, such as 4. Reach out for support in a caregiver home care agencies, transportation support group or online bulletin board or services and community senior centers. “buddy” system. The attached list of resource links is a good starting point. 5. If you decide to retain the services of a home care agency or professional geriatric care manager, ask them to develop a customized “plan of care” that outlines physical needs, cognitive needs, and goals. 14
  15. 15. Frequently Asked Questions Are the caregivers I hire bonded Ask about training, screening and & insured? selection systems used to determine the This should be a standard with any best match between a paid caregiver and professional home care agency, inclusive the recipient of care. of criminal history background clearances on each paid caregiver, Will the same caregiver come general liability insurance and worker’s each day/shift? compensation insurance. Yes. Developing strong rapport and trust between the family, care recipient and Will I have a choice of who comes your paid caregiver is a vital component to to my home? a successful caregiving experience. Within reason, the family should always have a say in choosing the paid caregivers. 15
  16. 16. Frequently Asked Questions If I change my mind, do I have to How can I verify a shift was keep the service? completed for a family member? You should never be locked into a Written time cards are often utilized, long-term pre-paid contract. Professional allowing family or the client to verify caregiving organizations typically collect services on a daily or weekly basis. A few refundable security deposits equivalent of the more progressive professional home to 1-2 weeks of projected service fees, care agencies combine written time cards rather than asking for pre-payment of with a newer technology called Telephony. services – no different that the security Telephony is a Web-based time and deposits collected when one moved into attendance solution, which verifies arrival an apartment. and departure times of paid caregivers via real-time electronic signals that are Do I pay the caregiver directly? activated by toll free calls made by the If hiring a paid caregiver privately, or caregiver from the client’s home phone. through a registry service, you should assume that you will be responsible for How is the privacy of my personal standard employer obligations – information maintained? including paying the caregiver(s). Services If you are working with a professional via professional home care agencies caregiving organization, you should ask for utilize an employment model, meaning written assurance that your personal health they should invoice you for services care information will never be shared with anyone in their organization besides those directly involved in your loved one’s care, and never sold to any 3rd party or affiliate Caregiver Tip: Telephony under any circumstances. is a Web-based time and attendance solution, which verifies arrival and departure times of paid caregivers via real-time electronic signals that are activated by toll free calls made by the caregiver from the client’s home phone. 16
  17. 17. Do I need a physician’s Many services also utilize formally-trained authorization/prescription? certified nursing assistants, home health Unless services are being reimbursed by aides and personal care assistants to Medicare, Medicaid or a private insurer, provide “hands-on personal care services” there typically is no pre-authorization, such as: certification, pre-qualification, or • Bathing and hygiene doctor’s prescription required. You start • Toileting and urinary/bowel the services when you want, and you continence care decide how much or how little home care service you would like. If reimbursement • Physical transferring from bed to from your insurance company is involved, wheelchair, wheelchair to toilet, etc. ask any professional caregiving • Feeding organization if they will assist with the often time-consuming, but necessary, Some services will also provide skilled billing process. nursing services, performed by Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses, What services are provided? such as: Virtually all paid caregiving services • Wound care and sterile provide “companion level” services to bandage changes assist with daily living activities such as: • Medication administration • Preparing meals • Feeding tube assistance • Medication reminders • Light exercise • Shopping and errands • Maintaining household cleanliness • Companionship and safety supervision 17
  18. 18. Adult Caregiving Resource Links Caregiving Education Family Caregiver Alliance and Resources Committed to caring for caregivers, resource site. Caring News www.caregiver.org Information, advice and support for adult caregiving. Includes articles and resources Hospice Association of America to assist family caregivers and health care A national organization representing more professionals who desire information than 2,800 hospices and thousands of about home care services. caregivers and volunteers who serve www.caringnews.com terminally ill patients and their families. www.hospice-america.org Direct Care Alliance A national, practitioner-based coalition National Academy of Elder of long-term care consumers, direct-care Law Attorneys workers, and concerned health care Provides information, education, providers who have come together to networking and assistance to those who pursue a common goal: broad-based deal with the many specialized issues reforms to ensure a stable, valued and involved with elderly care legal services well-trained direct-care workforce that can and people with special needs. meet consumers’ demands for high-quality www.naela.com paraprofessional health care services. www.directcarealliance.org National Area Agencies on Aging The National Association of Area Eldercare Locator Agencies on Aging (n4a) is the umbrella A public service of the U.S. Administration organization for the 655 area agencies on on Aging. The Eldercare Locator connects aging (AAAs) and more than 230 Title older Americans and their caregivers with VI Native American aging programs in sources of information on senior the U.S. The fundamental mission is to care services. provide services which make it possible for www.eldercare.gov/Eldercare/Public/Home.asp older individuals to remain in their home. www.n4a.org 18
  19. 19. National Association of National Private Duty Association Professional Geriatric The National Private Duty Association Care Managers (NPDA) is a non-profit national voice for A national network of organizations and organizations that provide private duty individuals dedicated to improving the home care services and an advocate for health and independence of older persons; services which benefit the consumers for increasing their continuing contributions whom they care: seniors, children, persons to communities, society and future gener- with disabilities, those with chronic health ations; and building caring communities. conditions, and anyone whose quality www.caremanager.org of life can be improved by having a care worker help in their home. National Clearinghouse on the www.privatedutyhomecare.org Direct Care Workforce Provides reliable up-to-date information ThirdAge for people who are working to improve Legal, insurance, financial, and housing direct caregiving jobs. resources for senior care. www.directcareclearinghouse.org www.thirdage.com National Family Disease-Specific Information Caregivers Association Supports, empowers, educates, and Alzheimer’s Association speaks up for the more than 50 million A national network of chapters, is the Americans who care for a chronically ill, largest national voluntary health aged or disabled loved one. NFCA organization committed to finding a cure reaches across the boundaries of for Alzheimer’s and helping those affected different diagnoses, different relationships by the disease. and different life stages to address the www.alz.org common needs and concerns of all family caregivers. American Association for www.nfcacares.org Respiratory Care AARC is the only professional society for National Guardianship respiratory therapists in hospitals and Association with home care companies, managers of Promoting a nationally recognized respiratory and cardiopulmonary services, standard of excellence in guardianship. and educators who provide respiratory www.guardianship.org care training. www.aarc.org 19
  20. 20. Adult Caregiving Resource Links Disease-Specific American Lung Association Information (continued) Founded in 1904 to fight tuberculosis, the American Lung Association® today fights American Cancer Society lung disease in all its forms, with special The American Cancer Society is the emphasis on asthma, tobacco control and nationwide community-based voluntary environmental health. health organization dedicated to www.lungusa.org eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving American Stroke Association lives, and diminishing suffering from The division of the American Heart cancer, through research, education, Association that’s solely focused on advocacy, and service. reducing disability and death from stroke www.cancer.org through research, education, fundraising and advocacy. American Diabetes Association www.strokeassociation.org The American Diabetes Association is the nation’s leading non-profit health National Parkinson Foundation organization providing diabetes research, Educational site on Parkinson’s disease. information and advocacy. www.parkinson.org www.diabetes.org Senior Health and American Heart Association Aging Information The American Heart Association is a national voluntary health agency whose Administration on Aging mission is to reduce disability and death Learn more about the Older Americans from cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Act, the federal legislation establishing the www.americanheart.org AoA and authorizing a range of programs that offer services and opportunities for older Americans and their caregivers. www.aoa.gov 20
  21. 21. American Society on Aging National Council on Aging Our resources, publications and educational National Council on Aging (NCOA) opportunities are geared to enhance the is dedicated to improving the health knowledge and skills of people working with and independence of older persons older adults and their families. and increasing their continuing www.asaging.org contributions to communities, society, and future generations. CMS-Centers for Medicare & www.ncoa.org Medicaid Services US Dept of Health and Human Services National Organization on Disability Web site – includes resources for Medicare The mission of the National Organization and Medicaid programs. on Disability (N.O.D.) is to expand the www.cms.hhs.gov participation and contribution of America’s 54 million men, women and children with FirstGov disabilities in all aspects of life. By raising Official US Government Web site. Laws, disability awareness through programs and regulations and legislation related to senior information, together we can work toward care issues. closing the participation gaps. www.seniors.gov www.nod.org Kaiser Foundation National Policy & Resource Center The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation is on Nutrition & Aging a non-profit, private operating foundation National Resource Center on nutrition, focusing on the major health care issues physical activity and aging. facing the nation. nutritionandaging.fiu.edu www.kff.org The Center for Social Gerontology Medicare A non-profit research, training and social Official US Government Web site for people policy organization dedicated to promoting with Medicare. the individual autonomy of older persons www.medicare.gov and advancing their well-being in society. www.tcsg.org National Alliance for Hispanic Health United We Ride To improve the health and well being of Coordinates transportation resources for Hispanics. The National Alliance for seniors and the disabled. Hispanic Health is the premier organization www.unitedweride.gov focusing on Hispanic health. www.hispanichealth.org 21
  22. 22. An Adult Caregiver’s Home Safety Checklist All Rooms: No loose carpeting or rugs that do not have a non-slip backing. Traffic areas free of furniture. Electrical cords and other wires taped against walls. Bright lighting with switches and all light bulbs in working order. Telephones placed on tables at a height that can be reached from the floor. Stairs and Inclines: Free of items placed on the steps. Plenty of room to move at top and bottom of stairs. No loose carpeting or edges to catch on. Handrails securely attached and at the proper height for user. Proper lighting on all steps, including switches at top and bottom of stairs. Bathroom: Grab bars near the tub, shower and toilet located and mounted properly. Non-slip surfaces in the tub or shower. Nightlight for when first entering the room. Rugs or bathmats with non-slip backing on the floor. Shower/tub bench or seat. 22
  23. 23. Bedroom: Bedside table with non-tip lamp and room for eyeglasses. Clear traffic area from bedroom to bathroom. Comfortable, sturdy chair to aid in dressing. Kitchen: Items placed where they can be reached without the use of a stool. Area to sit during food preparation. Flooring free of cracks, splits or up-turned edges. Individual: Someone checking on the individual daily. Schedule vision check. Discuss medications with physician to determine affects on balance. Establish light exercise routine. 23
  24. 24. An Adult Caregiver’s Needs Assessment Worksheet This worksheet will help you and other family members determine what types of assistance your loved one needs. Activities Of Daily Living (ADLs) Activity Accomplishes alone Needs some help Needs much help Bathing Dressing Grooming Toileting Eating a nutritious diet Getting out of bed Getting out of chair Walking Instrumental Activities Of Daily Living (IADLs) Activity Accomplishes alone Needs some help Needs much help Using the telephone Shopping for personal items Transportation Managing money Doing laundry Doing light housework Preparing meals 24
  25. 25. Conditions/Functional Status How do the following affect the person’s ability to function? Limitation No effect Some effect Major effect Hearing Vision Perception Orientation Thinking Memory Decision-Making/Judgment Physical dexterity Balance Strength Energy Bladder or bowel control Arthritis Hypertension Heart disease Diabetes Physical deformity Depression 25
  26. 26. An Adult Caregiver’s Needs Assessment Worksheet Environmental Safety Which barriers can be removed or changed? Neighborhood: Limitation No Problem Needs to be changed Safety Convenience Friends or relatives nearby Living Quarters: Condition Age of dwelling Roof in good repair Windows in good repair Siding in good condition Looks cared for Security and safety Dead bolt locks on outside doors Peephole in front door Window bars or locks Visible from road (no large trees or bushes block view) Smoke alarms installed, tested Passageways clear of wires and clutter Stairs: Free of obstacles and clutter Well-lit Handrails on both sides In good repair and nonskid Clearly marked 26
  27. 27. Floors: Limitation No Problem Needs to be changed Nonskid level surfaces Nonglare surfaces No loose rugs Furnishings: Couch and chairs easy to use Tables the right height Bed easy to get in and out of Lighting: Light switches easy to reach Entries and walkways well-lit Reading areas well-lit Light diffused from windows and surfaces (no glare) Passageways have night lights Kitchen: Lever handles on sink Clean rubber mat by the sink Items used often are accessible Storage is easy to get to No objects are over the stove Well-lit Bathroom: Grab bars attached to studs, by the toilet and tub or shower Nonskid strips in the tub or shower Hand-held shower head Nonslip bath mat or rug Reproduced with permission from FamilyCare America, Inc 27
  28. 28. 9900 Bren Road East Minnetonka, MN 55343 1-866-475-3959 TTY 1-866-832-8671 (open daily 8am – 8pm) Secure Horizons Medicare Advantage plans are offered by any of the following: UnitedHealthcare of Alabama, Inc., UnitedHealthcare of Arizona, Inc., UnitedHealthcare of Arkansas, Inc., UnitedHealthcare of Florida, Inc., UnitedHealthcare of Georgia, Inc., UnitedHealthcare of New England Inc., United Healthcare of New York, Inc., UnitedHealthcare of North Carolina, Inc., UnitedHealthcare of Ohio, Inc., UnitedHealthcare of Tennessee, Inc., UnitedHealthcare of the Midlands, Inc., United Healthcare of the Midwest, Inc., UnitedHealthcare of Utah, Inc., UnitedHealthcare of Wisconsin, Inc., United Healthcare Insurance Company, United Healthcare Insurance Company of New York for New York residents, United Healthcare of the River Valley, Inc., Oxford Health Plans (NY), Inc., Oxford Health Plans (NJ), Inc., Oxford Health Plans (CT), Inc., PacifiCare, PacifiCare of Colorado, or PacifiCare Life and Health Insurance Company, Medicare Advantage Organizations with a Medicare contract. 100-D4454 11/06 © 2006 UnitedHealthcare Services, Inc. TM Live Secure. Be Secure.

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