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Content for Bots, Chat, and Service 4.0 Environments

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We've heard of artificial intelligence, cognitive computing, big data, machine learning - all the buzzwords - but what does that mean for the way we produce and deliver content? This presentation delves into the the tactics that support strategic initiatives.

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Content for Bots, Chat, and Service 4.0 Environments

  1. 1. @ScrollUK Content for Bots, Chat, and Service 4.0 Environments @rahelab Photo credit: Rahel Anne Bailie Copyright © 2018 Scroll LLP Considerations for an Integrated Content Strategy
  2. 2. • UK’s only full-service content company • Provider of writers, editors, content designers • Content strategy, content engineering, UX, and related services • Training for content professionals
  3. 3. Photo of presenter here Rahel Anne Bailie Chief Knowledge Officer, Scroll 15+ years content strategy 10+ years tech communication Consulting / Instruction / Author
  4. 4. The changing landscape of content
  5. 5. First, some definitions Deep learning From The Deep AI Learning Playbook by Carlos E. Perez A connectionist approach to artificial intelligence, where a large number of simple components collectively exhibit complex behaviour Artificial intelligence Systems based on symbolic logic, such as expert systems, deductive logic systems, where humans handcraft the symbolic rules Machine learning Curve fitting – that is, using algorithms that find the best fit of your mathematical model with observed data Big data Premise is that technology can store and compute through masses of data to allow humans to gain insights
  6. 6. First, some definitions https://www.marxentlabs.com/what-is-virtual-reality/ Augmented reality Technology that superimposes a computer-generated image on a user's view of the real world, providing a composite view. Virtual reality An immersive experience using technology to create a simulated environment. Unlike traditional user interfaces, VR places the user inside an experience.
  7. 7. We might call this cognitive computing Cognitive computing comes from a mashup of cognitive science — the study of the human brain and how it functions — and computer science, and the results will have far-reaching impacts on our private lives, healthcare, business, and more. Why cognitive computing? The goal of cognitive computing is to simulate human thought processes in a computerized model. Using self-learning algorithms that use data mining, pattern recognition and natural language processing, the computer can mimic the way the human brain works. https://www.forbes.com/sites/bernardmarr/2016/03/23/what-everyone-should-know-about-cognitive- computing/#6d428c625088
  8. 8. Companies are offering services with all the buzzwords Big data analysis? Machine learning? Augmented intelligence? Cognitive virtual assistant? Human natural language? Manages multimedia content Parallel web application Registers real time statistics Value users experience http://www.skios.com/products-services/eliza-tourism-cognitive-solutions/
  9. 9. I’m a marketer – what does this have to do with me?
  10. 10. Understand the importance of the computing power behind the technologies Understand what the potential is in your segment Know what these systems can do
  11. 11. What can cognitive computing do? • A cognitive system can integrate data from multiple heterogenous sources and big data. • The functionality of natural language processing can be implemented, hereby the cognitive system transforms human speech into machine-readable text, which enables to interact with human. • The functionality of machine learning can be implemented to improve and correct its understanding. From “Cognitive computing for the hospitality industry” by L. Essenstam, Universiteit Twente
  12. 12. Those properties translate into • Always-available concierge systems: Making reservations, check-in, check-out, in-room services such as changing temperature, adjusting the lighting, and so on • Personalised experiences Bot personality recommends local attractions and related info, focused on interests of the particular guest • Friendlier experiences Understanding and communicating in natural language through voice interfaces • Service blueprinting (service design, customer experience maps) Map interactions from customer point-of-view, to identify business processes, failure points, and potential points for automated support systems From “Cognitive computing for the hospitality industry” by L. Essenstam, Universiteit Twente
  13. 13. Anticipate the ways this technology could be used in your industry Be prepared for the things you can’t anticipate Think of some industry improvements
  14. 14. Changing the way we travel • How we search travel options Basing search options on past behaviours: flight options such as early vs late flight times, budget vs luxury accommodation, types of leisure activities, typical price points • Disruption management Cancelling and rebooking flights, hotels, and ground travel in the case of travel delays http://www.dcsplus.net/blog/how-cognitive-computing-could-change-how-we-travel Trainine PriceBot Trainine BusyBot
  15. 15. Changing the way we travel • Providing personalised information based on: • Your interests: do you want adventures or the arts • Your language: translated just for you • Your profile: different local info for history buffs or fashionistas • Making venue-specific experiences better • Analysing visitor behaviour at your venue • Improving the experience, from arrival to departure https://medium.com/cognitivebusiness/cognitive-tourism-how-a-popular-tourist-destination-personalizes-your-visit- 4ca5c3efc0ce and http://www.ibmbigdatahub.com/blog/insights-venue-data-keep-visitors-coming-back-more
  16. 16. Changes we can’t anticipate https://skift.com/2016/03/29/ibm-watson-is-changing-travel-in-ways-nobodys-expecting/
  17. 17. How does this affect my content?
  18. 18. Source: Wikipedia Delivering content in a Service 4.0 environment
  19. 19. Efficiency through the value chain to meet greater needs Big Data and Analytics. Deeper insight into customer behaviour, preferences, and pathways Bionic Computing. Natural interaction with virtual agents, digital devices, and services Ubiquitous Connectivity and IoT. Ongoing connections (on-the-spot service provision, remote monitoring) Cloud Computing. Manage large data volumes in open systems and provide services on demand Cognitive Computing. Simulate human thought processes, provide intelligent virtual help Smart Devices. Ecosystem of apps and cloud services using high-performance devices Robotic Process Automation. Replace humans rule-based work processes Virtualisation. Remove reliance on specific hardware/software for operational flexibility Augmented Reality. Provide needed info on demand (manuals, pricing, alerts) Source: BCG
  20. 20. Reading between the lines Big Data and Analytics. Deeper insight into customer behaviour, preferences, and pathways Bionic Computing. Natural interaction with virtual agents, digital devices, and services Ubiquitous Connectivity and IoT. Ongoing connections (on-the-spot service provision, remote monitoring) Cloud Computing. Manage large data [and content] volumes in open systems and provide services on demand Cognitive Computing. Simulate human thought processes, provide intelligent virtual help Smart Devices. Ecosystem of apps and cloud services using high-performance devices Robotic Process Automation. Replace humans rule-based work processes Virtualisation. Remove reliance on specific hardware/software for operational flexibility Augmented Reality. Provide needed information on demand (manuals, pricing, alerts)
  21. 21. Service 4.0 means transforming consumer interactions https://www.bcg.com/capabilities/operations/service-4-0-transforming-customer-interactions.aspx
  22. 22. In pragmatic terms, Service 4.0 means There is a well-defined superset corpus of content. There are defined subsets of content for personalisation or multichannel delivery. The content can be updated from a predictable source in an offered model. Semantically structured and tagged, held in a repository - offered, not delivered. http://information4zero.org/category/information-4-0/ Consumer interacts with service. (Information Request) Service makes a calculation (Takes Reading) Service finds the best solution (Makes Change) Service finds best content match (Look Up in Repository) Service delivers content to consumer (Read Aloud)
  23. 23. Defragment content Tighten content operations Tighten the content itself Prepare content for the unexpected
  24. 24. Omnichannel: content for multiple contexts Content that comes/goes: • From the right sources • On the right platforms • To the right audiences • Through the right channels • With the right configuration • In the right formats • In the right versions • In the right languages • In the right media • At the right times • In the right contexts
  25. 25. Adaptive content: operational considerations STAGES Discover Inform Interact Rate IterateArrival X X Induction X X Interaction X X X X Departure X X Device Audience Market Language Platform Content States Laptop Tablet Mobile Wearable Kiosk Chatbot Voicebot Novice Experienced ------------- New traveller Family vacation Business traveller Mobility issue UK USA Canada Australia New Zealand India UK English US English AU English CA English CA French CH French LU French iOS Android Windows Linux Green state (operational) Amber state 1 Amber state 2 Red state (danger) Marketing UXteam TechComm Agency Developer Persuasive X Informational X X Support X X Conversational X X
  26. 26. Content Ops: from relative chaos • Track in Trello or Jira • Copy and paste content into MS Word • Write in Word / Consult style guide/checklists (PDF) • Share and get approval via Outlook/Gmail • Copy and paste to Help Authoring Tool for workflow trail • Translate via TRADOS / Consult the termbase • Push via various tools to the Web CMS
  27. 27. Content Ops: keeping content under control http://idratherbewriting.com/2014/10/21/docops-interview-with-jim-turcotte/
  28. 28. What’s a stylesheet? Structure? I use headings! We give it to our agency. We have “people” who put it in the CMS. Meta-what? I’m sure our systems don’t do that. I don’t have time for this stuff. That’s up to the digital people. What will it take to make content operations succeed?
  29. 29. Upskilling of comms staff More awareness Agency alignment Personal responsibility Clear benefits Cross-functional collaboration Cultural change Porousness of silos Organisational cooperation, porous silos
  30. 30. Source: Information 4.0 Consortium
  31. 31. Characteristics and principles of Information 4.0 Profiled – semantically structured for personalised use Offered – rather than delivered; supplied for use by multiple technologies Dynamic – continuously updated Independent – autonomous; can be used in multiple contexts Ubiquitous – online, searchable, and findable Molecular – no documents, just information molecules Spontaneous – triggered by contexts Information 4.0 Consortium
  32. 32. Standards are like toothbrushes. Everybody agrees you should use one, but no one wants to use anyone else’s. A note about standards
  33. 33. Microformats Standardised formats for small units of content (person, event, etc) Virtually all common information units have a microformat. Schema.org This is the microformat standard that the major browsers agreed upon as their preferred standard. Existing standards: presentation, connection, translation XLIFF XML-based format to standardise interoperability between tools for the localisation of content. RDF triples RDF triples describe a “thing” (topic) in three different ways: subject, predicate, and object to provide context about the thing being described, and helps make search results more relevant and disambiguates similar topics.
  34. 34. Speech Interface Standard Enables speech enabled applications based on Web technologies to interoperate Chatbot standard AIML (Artificial Intelligence Markup Language) is an XML-compliant language that makes it possible to customise an Alicebot or create one from scratch within minutes. IoT standard Web of Devices group of initiatives to enable Web access anywhere, anytime, using any device. This includes Web access from mobile phones and other mobile devices as well as use of Web technology in consumer electronics, printers, interactive television, and even automobiles. Emerging standards
  35. 35. Conclusion Overwhelmed? Hope not! Prepare for the next level of content ecosystem
  36. 36. By email: info@scroll.co.uk rahel.bailie@scroll.co.uk By telephone: UK +44 (0)203 318 1828 (office) UK +44 (0)7869 643 685 (mobile) Want some content goodness on a regular basis? Subscribe to Scroll up! Social: Twitter: @ScrollUK LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/scroll-llp Twitter: @rahelab LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/rahelannebailie Services and training www.scroll.co.uk SCROLL London, UK

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