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Sustainability Jobs in India at GE
At GE, we are builders. It goes beyond businesses, brands and infrastructure. In Sustai...
World’s Most Admired Companies
Fortune, 2012
The World’s Most Ethical Companies
Ethisphere, 2012
Best Companies for Leader...
Has his/her own employees
Maintains a separate business checking account
Advertises his/her business' services
Invoices fo...
Flexibility in hiring and firing
Why Does It Matter?
Misclassification of an individual as an independent contractor may h...
1. The extent to which the services rendered are an integral part of the principal's business
2. The permanency of the rel...
Contract jobs can be a beneficial springboard to other opportunities
For those looking to find a job, permanent positions ...
They'll also show your ability and openness to learn new things fast. Employers love to see an application from someone
wh...
The staffing agency. At the end of the year, you'll receive a W-2 from the agency. Independent consultants, on the other
h...
What if I leave an assignment before the contract's end date?
The agency will expect you to give ample notice before leavi...
India’s demographic challenge
Wasting time
India will soon have a fifth of the world’s working-age population. It urgently...
There is lots to celebrate about this. Mr Singh’s business has sales of $185m and its employee base has grown by 1,600% si...
In the 1990s, though, economic liberalisers evoked the experiences of East Asia and the demographic dividend it benefited ...
places. For years India’s politicians have preferred economic palliatives such as NREGA, a giant scheme that guarantees wo...
a half-built private-run campus in Patna most students have modest expectations of their future salaries—typically $500 a
...
What manufacturing FDI India does attract tends to be high-end—Volkswagen has a smart €570m plant full of robots.
Meanwhil...
their lives. We are ready for a long fight.” The Maruti violence has so far been a one-off. But the episode unnerved
busin...
firms. A new twist is a proposed industrial corridor between Delhi and Mumbai, inspired by the expressway between Seoul
an...
Failing gently
Could the voices of the young change this? There is a rising level of political involvement. A recent surve...
The lack of political resolve and of a clear signal from voters mean India is unlikely to summon up the single-minded
dedi...
 Envirogen Recruitment Solutions
Source positions within the UK and Worldwide renewable energy markets.
 Environmental R...
 The Curzon Partnership - Recruitment Agency
The Curzon Partnership LLP is an independent executive search firm serving c...
Sustainability jobs & contract employment in india
Sustainability jobs & contract employment in india
Sustainability jobs & contract employment in india
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Sustainability jobs & contract employment in india

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Sustainability jobs & contract employment in india

  1. 1. Sustainability Jobs in India at GE At GE, we are builders. It goes beyond businesses, brands and infrastructure. In Sustainability jobs in over 160 countries, GE employees have an unparalleled foundation on which to build their careers, their abilities and their dreams. We offer employees challenging, rewards careers in dynamic businesses. Our people are the architects of the future. We sit in the front seat of history. Innovation and Imagination at GE From the outset, innovation has been part of GE's DNA. That means being surrounded by bright, interesting people working together on Sustainability projects. It means trying to find new and better ways of doing things. And it means enjoying a career with extraordinary opportunities and enormous potential. Apply to our Sustainability jobs in India at GE. Life at GE Our culture is about providing everyone who works here with opportunities to exercise their responsibility, integrity, and creativity while growing themselves, their careers, and our business. Working Environment Operating with Integrity How we deliver results is as important as the results themselves. GE seeks to lead in workplace and marketplace integrity by respecting the human rights of everyone touched by our business, and by enforcing legal and financial compliance. These commitments are detailed in our integrity policy, The Spirit & The Letter, which every employee supports with a signed pledge. They are further enabled by our ombudsperson process, which encourages any employee to report integrity concerns without fear of reprisal. Work and Life Balance Naturally, the passion that our people bring to their work extends to their own private worlds, and GE is committed to enabling a healthy balance between the two. GE encourages our people to meet their work commitments while balancing their own life responsibilities. To support this balance, flexible work arrangements are an integral part of the way we conduct business. The Company also offers many programs and resources to support employees including financial management, family counseling and more. Awards & Recognition
  2. 2. World’s Most Admired Companies Fortune, 2012 The World’s Most Ethical Companies Ethisphere, 2012 Best Companies for Leaders Chief Executive, 2012 . What’s Important to Us Diversity As a global company with operations in more than 100 countries, diversity isn't merely a noble idea — it's the reflection of our business. Every day, GE works to ensure that all employees, no matter where they are located in the world and no matter where they come from, have an opportunity to contribute and succeed. Hire a Contractor or an Employee? Independent contractors and employees are not the same, and it's important to understand the difference. Knowing this distinction will help you determine what your first hiring move will be and affect how you withhold a variety of taxes and avoid costly legal consequences. What’s the Difference? An Independent Contractor: Operates under a business name
  3. 3. Has his/her own employees Maintains a separate business checking account Advertises his/her business' services Invoices for work completed Has more than one client Has own tools and sets own hours Keeps business records An Employee: Performs duties dictated or controlled by others Is given training for work to be done Works for only one employer Many small businesses rely on independent contractors for their staffing needs. There are many benefits to using contractors over hiring employees: Savings in labor costs Reduced liability
  4. 4. Flexibility in hiring and firing Why Does It Matter? Misclassification of an individual as an independent contractor may have a number of costly legal consequences. If your independent contractor is discovered to meet the legal definition of an employee, you may be required to: Reimburse them for wages you should've paid them under the Fair Labor Standards Act, including overtime and minimum wage Pay back taxes and penalties for federal and state income taxes, Social Security, Medicare and unemployment Pay any misclassified injured employees workers' compensation benefits Provide employee benefits, including health insurance, retirement, etc. Tax Requirements Visit the IRS Independent Contractor or Employee guide to learn about the tax implications of either scenario, download and fill out a form to have the IRS officially determine your workers’ status, and find other related resources. Employment Information There is no single test for determining if an individual is an independent contractor or an employee under the Fair Labor Standards Act. However, the following guidelines should be taken into account:
  5. 5. 1. The extent to which the services rendered are an integral part of the principal's business 2. The permanency of the relationship 3. The amount of the alleged contractor's investment in facilities and equipment 4. The nature and degree of control by the principal 5. The alleged contractor's opportunities for profit and loss 6. The amount of initiative, judgment, or foresight in open market competition with others that is required for the success of the claimed independent contractor 7. The degree of independent business organization and operation Whether a person is an independent contractor or an employee generally depends on the amount of control exercised by the employer over the work being done. Read Equal Employment Opportunity Laws - Who's Covered? for more information on how to determine whether a person is an independent contractor or an employee, and which are covered under federal laws.
  6. 6. Contract jobs can be a beneficial springboard to other opportunities For those looking to find a job, permanent positions may seem like the way to go, but the rising popularity of contract work in the economy can be as beneficial as a regular position, giving you tools and abilities you might not have expected to receive while allowing you more freedom than a locked-in 9 to 5 would provide. Seventeen million Americans are currently employed via contract work, according to Fox Business, representing a whopping 12 percent of the entire American workforce. With those numbers set to rise further in coming months, not only are many workers turning to new areas of employment, but many find they enjoy them more than a full-time position for a few reasons. One useful advantage to contract positions, the news source said, is to show resourcefulness and prevent gaps in work history. If you've recently been laid off or decided to look for new work and your search hasn't been successful yet, doing contract work can show your ability to keep moving and working, leagues better than a large hole on your resume. Your ability to change doesn't just show your ability to work but your ability to excel in different fields, and adapt to new challenges easily. Your contract work will also show your work ethic, as taking it on shows you're driven enough to find opportunities where others may not. In many positions, finding connections is a desired skill, and your ability to search uncharted employment territory can be a big plus in future opportunities. Update your skills while learning new ones Using a contract agency to find yourself a position can also have positive effects upon your overall work experiences, giving you more knowledge about recent trends in the office you might not otherwise become aware of. Many will require you to improve skills usable in most future jobs, from learning new computer technology to new methods and processes to make your work faster and better. Placing these skills on a resume demonstrates your ability to keep up with the latest trends.
  7. 7. They'll also show your ability and openness to learn new things fast. Employers love to see an application from someone who doesn't want to stop learning new and better ways to keep improving themselves, and the right contract job can give you all the experience you'll need to get an advantage. If you have an opportunity to choose between contract positions, try to choose one that piques your interest. It won't hurt if you want to learn more about whatever new industry you land in. Network growth and possible long-time jobs Additionally, connecting with new people in your field, or a field you're looking to enter in the future, can be a big advantage of contract work, according to CareerBuilder. Meeting and forming relationships with your coworkers can pay off in more than one way - if you're looking for a permanent position there, knowing employees will help you get your foot in the door. Even if you're not interested in continuing with that company, your new friends and colleagues can greatly assist your job search ability in the future, from knowing about new opportunities coming up to getting you in touch with other people in the industry to point you in the right direction. Contract work doesn't necessarily have to be temporary, either. Excelling at your contract placement can catch the eye of your employers, who will likely turn inside the company when looking to fill permanent positions in the future. Forty-two percent of employers planning to hire contract employees in 2013 expect to transfer at least some of those employees into permanent positions. IT Contract Work FAQ By Allan Hoffman, Monster Tech Jobs Expert Technology professionals often work contract jobs, essentially spending several months on a project with one organization and then moving on to a new assignment elsewhere. Sometimes this work arrangement is by choice; other times it's a way for techies to earn a living between full-time jobs. Even if techies learn the ins and outs of contract employment over the course of their careers, they still have lots of questions about it. So if techies have questions, we've got answers. What's the difference between being a contract employee and an independent consultant? Contract employees are hired by consulting or staffing agencies and then placed in assignments at businesses that need help on projects. Independent consultants typically market their own services to businesses and bill them for those services. The term "consultant" is often used to refer to both situations. This article refers to contract employees. Who pays me as a contractor?
  8. 8. The staffing agency. At the end of the year, you'll receive a W-2 from the agency. Independent consultants, on the other hand, get 1099s from their clients and must pay self-employment taxes and quarterly income taxes. Will I make more through contract employment? About 30 percent more is typical, says Larry Bruce, a vice president at Sapphire Technologies, a staffing service that places permanent and contract IT professionals. That monetary advantage may disappear, though, once you take benefits into consideration. Will I receive benefits? "Fringe benefits vary widely," says Joshua Feinberg, cofounder of Computer Consulting 101, a training firm for IT consultants. The staffing agency may offer -- or allow you to buy into -- group health and retirement plans, but you may not get paid vacation or sick time. Depending on the firm, you may be able to negotiate benefits. Is there a common duration for assignments? A typical IT assignment might last about six months, says Jim Lanzalotto, a vice president at staffing firm Yoh. Three- month or year-long assignments are also common. What are the key parts of the contract I sign? The agreement between you and the staffing firm will likely spell out the pay rate, the contract duration, your job role and your hours. Some contracts may include other details specific to the company, such as the dress code, Bruce says. What does contract-to-hire mean? In these arrangements, the staffing agency agrees with the company that after a certain period -- six months, for instance -- the company will have the option to hire you as a permanent employee. You have no obligation to accept that offer, and the company has no obligation to extend one. What does being "on the bench" mean? Some staffing companies retain their consultants even if they have no work for them. That means you would be paid without having to report to an assignment.
  9. 9. What if I leave an assignment before the contract's end date? The agency will expect you to give ample notice before leaving. Agencies prefer that you do not leave in the middle of a contract, but it happens. Just don't make a habit of it. "If you're constantly backing out of assignments, that catches up with you," Bruce says. Will contracting give me more flexibility? In theory, yes. As a contract employee, you can take a six-month assignment, say, and then take a few months off to travel or pursue a personal interest. Will I need to travel for assignments? Not always, but if you have a very specialized skill, travel may help your prospects. "You definitely help your position in the marketplace if you're willing to travel," says Terry Phillips, the regional manager at Robert Half Technology in Akron. Will I keep learning? "Consulting does allow you more freedom to develop your skill set," Phillips says. "When you work for Company X, Y or Z, you are limited to the technologies within those organizations." Bruce says that contracting requires a different mentality about learning. You need to realize that you're building your skill set for yourself, typically by gaining exposure to new companies, new challenges and new technologies with each assignment. That means you should seek assignments that fit with your overall career goals. Articles in This Feature:
  10. 10. India’s demographic challenge Wasting time India will soon have a fifth of the world’s working-age population. It urgently needs to provide them with better jobs May 11th 2013 | PATNA, BIHAR |From the print edition ONE of India’s bigger private-sector employers can be found in Patna, the capital of Bihar, a poor, populous state in the east of the country. Narendra Kumar Singh, the boss, has three gold rings on his right hand and arms big enough to crush rocks. His firm, Frontline, has 86,000 people on its books. They are mostly unskilled men from rural areas in poor states like Bihar; thanks to Mr Singh they have jobs in cities all over India.
  11. 11. There is lots to celebrate about this. Mr Singh’s business has sales of $185m and its employee base has grown by 1,600% since 2000. He is looking for a Western partner and wants to expand to Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. He is providing paid work for part of the large cohort of young people now entering the workforce. And by shifting people from farms to cities he is helping urbanisation of the sort that underpinned startling progress elsewhere in Asia. Related topics South-East Asia Indonesia Delhi Economies Indian economy Yet Frontline is also a symptom of a colossal failure. For it is not supplying labour for a manufacturing boom of the kind that helped so many in China, South Korea and Taiwan out of poverty, or for the IT services at which India has excelled. Instead it offers relatively unproductive service-sector jobs—in particular, security guards. It has become de rigueur for every ATM, office, shop and apartment building to have guards. Across India millions of young men now sit all day on plastic seats in badly fitting uniforms with braids and epaulettes, unshaven and catatonically bored as the economic miracle passes by. This isn’t how East Asia got rich. From a bomb to a boom and back During the boom of the 1990s and 2000s, it became fashionable to talk of India’s forthcoming “demographic dividend”. This was quite a turnaround. In the 1960s and 1970s, the booming populations of states like Bihar were seen as a curse. “The Population Bomb”, a Malthusian bestseller by two American environmentalists, Paul and Anne Ehrlich, began by describing “one stinking hot night in Delhi”, and its horrifying number of “people, people, people, people”. In the 1970s there was a forced sterilisation programme. Sanjay Gandhi, a thuggish scion of the ruling dynasty, organised vasectomy camps near Delhi—one doctor boasted he could perform 40 sterilisations an hour.
  12. 12. In the 1990s, though, economic liberalisers evoked the experiences of East Asia and the demographic dividend it benefited from when previously high fertility rates began to decline. Working-age populations rose at the same time as the ratio of dependants to workers fell. An associated rise in the rate of saving allowed more investment, helping pay for the vast expansion in manufacturing that employed those workers and lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty. In the mid2000s the prospect of a similar dividend in India, where the fertility rate had dropped a lot in the 1980s and 1990s, was a key reason for investors’ optimism. The timing was particularly encouraging: India’s labour force was due to soar as China’s began to decline (see chart 1). Now many are worried that India is squandering this demographic opportunity. This is partly because the economy is in a funk. Growth is at 4.5%, half the rate at the peak in the mid-2000s. Industry is 27% of output, compared with 40-47% in other big developing Asian economies. High inflation has prompted households to store ever more of their savings in physical assets rather than the financial system (see chart 2). The costs are clear. With few manufacturing exports, India has a chronic balance-of-payments problem. And India has created too few formal jobs in the past decade. India’s leaders have long said they are committed to employment, but have shown little stomach for the economic upheaval rapid job creation entails. China’s policymakers accepted that the process of adding jobs overall often destroyed jobs in particular industries and
  13. 13. places. For years India’s politicians have preferred economic palliatives such as NREGA, a giant scheme that guarantees work for the rural poor, and subsidies for the needy. Now India’s borrowing has soared to queasy levels and welfare spending is being squeezed. There are worries that joblessness could be feeding the spasmodic unrest seen in some cities since 2011. Not all protesters were young. And their motivation varied from support for the anti-corruption guru Anna Hazare to disgust at a series of rapes in Delhi. But the protests added to a sense of youthful volatility. An official report into the public finances in 2012 warned that a combination of slower growth and the demographic bulge could be “politically destabilising”. Rahul Gandhi, who is poised to lead the ruling Congress party in the general election due by 2014, speaks of the “angry” young and their “urgent demand for jobs”. The government’s economic adviser, Raghuram Rajan, says jobs are the biggest priority. Some in the elite seem to be waking up. But is it too late? Quantity and quality To see the scale of the challenge, consider that the working-age population, aged between 15 and 64, will rise by 125m over the coming decade, and by a further 103m over the following decade. On current trends a third of the growth will come from poorer and less literate states in the north, notably Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. Not everyone of working age will be in the job market. More people aged 15-24 will remain in education—26% do today. Some adult women will stay at home; presently only about a third work, a low level by Asian standards. But India probably needs to create about 100m net new jobs in the next decade. China’s boom created 130m net jobs in services and industry between 2002 and 2012. But India is no China. The most recent survey showed no net new jobs were created between 2004-05 and 2009-10, a dramatic slowdown on the previous five years, when 60m jobs were created. These figures may not be as shocking as they seem. Fewer jobs were created partly because some folk voluntarily withdrew from the workforce. More women in rural areas decided not to look for jobs—perhaps because several fairly good years for farmers meant they did not need the cash. Wages for the unskilled have been rising, and though this is partly because of the NREGA guaranteed-work scheme, it suggests there has not been a collapse in the jobs market. For all these caveats, though, the headline data remain disquieting. Even during a boom few jobs were created. Now that the economy is growing more slowly things have got harder. The rural poor seem likely to be frustrated, which will add to the number of migrants headed for the cities. The better- educated will suffer, too. By some estimates India produces twice as many new graduates each year as it can absorb. In
  14. 14. a half-built private-run campus in Patna most students have modest expectations of their future salaries—typically $500 a month. Even so, their professor worries they won’t all get job offers. The problem lies not just in the quantity of jobs, though; quality matters too. Statistics verify what the naked eye can see in any Indian city. They all have their armies of guards, peons, delivery boys, ear-dewaxers and men who sit on stools in lifts pressing the buttons. About 85% of India’s jobs are with “informal” enterprises—those organisations with fewer than ten staff which are not incorporated. Another 11% are casual jobs with formal companies. Only 16% of Indians say they get a regular wage. People with informal jobs are usually very poor. An official study of 2004-05 data concludes that 80% of informal workers got less than the then national minimum wage of $1.46 a day. There are some good jobs. But India’s IT firms, for example, account for only a few million jobs out of a total of half a billion. All this seems to be closely linked to the lack of manufacturing. Although some 23% of Indian workers are categorised as working in “industry”, compared to nearly 30% in China and 22% in Indonesia, half of India’s “industrial” workers are in construction whereas the figure is just a quarter in Indonesia. Of the remainder almost all are in the “manufacturing” subcategory. But these are not jobs that involve exposure to modern machinery, techniques and training (crucial for unskilled labour let down by the country’s education system). More than half of Indians in the manufacturing sector work in facilities without electricity. The obvious problem is a “missing middle”. Most of the jobs are in tiny operations. Most of the value added is in a few big, sophisticated firms that prefer using machines to humans. Some, such as Tata Sons and Mahindra, are well-known. Most of those seem keener on expanding globally than on building factories at home. For every dollar of foreign direct investment (FDI) made by outsiders in Indian manufacturing in the five years to March 2012, local firms invested 65 cents in manufacturing abroad. The number of jobs in factories (excluding the very smallest) has increased since 2005; but only by 2.8m.
  15. 15. What manufacturing FDI India does attract tends to be high-end—Volkswagen has a smart €570m plant full of robots. Meanwhile investment is pouring into Vietnam and Indonesia (see chart 3) as costs in China rise. Li & Fung, a big trading firm based in Hong Kong which buys goods in Asia and sells them in the West to retailers including Walmart, gets some 5% of its goods from India, compared with about 20% from South-East Asia. Death on the shop floor India’s missed opportunity is most evident in textiles and clothing, a labour-intensive industry that has been dominated by China. In 2011 McKinsey, a consultancy, found that purchasing managers at global clothing firms wanted to shift their sourcing from China; their favoured new destinations included Bangladesh, Vietnam, Indonesia and Cambodia—but not India. India’s textile exports have grown, but those from Vietnam and Bangladesh, combined, easily outstrip them. Why don’t more people want to make things in India? Indian migrant workers are sought across the world, not least in the Gulf. But at home tricky labour relations are a problem. In a dusty lawyers’ room in the industrial belt near Delhi, five workers explain how they were fired by Maruti Suzuki, a carmaker controlled by Suzuki of Japan, after simmering tensions on the shop floor led to a riot at a nearby plant in July 2012. A manager was burned to death. The men are in their 20s and from rural families. They have a strong sense of injustice. “We have told our families that they should consider us as behind bars and that they should make other plans for
  16. 16. their lives. We are ready for a long fight.” The Maruti violence has so far been a one-off. But the episode unnerved businesspeople. Economists have long identified arcane labour laws as the key to India’s manufacturing problem. Scholars have gleefully dissected India’s 51 central and 170 state labour statutes, some of which pre-date independence, to demonstrate how they make it hard for firms with more than a handful of staff to fire people and allow disputes to become legal endurance tests. Studies have shown how tighter rules impede growth in labour-intensive industries and prompt firms to remain small. Two-tier world Yet the industrial belt in which Maruti’s factory sits shows times have changed. Big firms can bypass labour law by using “contract” workers, technically employed by third-party agents. In the past decade they have used—or, workers say, abused—this kink in the rules a lot more. At three car and motorbike plants, based on discussions with workers, about 70% of 14,500 staff work on a contract basis. Their average wage is $5-6 per working day, a quarter of what permanent, unionised staff get. The minimum wage in Guangzhou, a Chinese industrial hub, is $10.5 per working day. That might appear to be good news. If lots of factory workers can be hired at globally competitive rates, on flexible terms, manufacturing firms should pile into India. In practice the situation is unstable. As the Maruti riot showed, the two-tier workforce has caused anger—the five men in the lawyers’ room were permanent employees who say they were disgusted by the treatment of their contract colleagues. Maruti is abandoning the distinction. And from a financial perspective the contract system is not as good as it looks for employers. They must still hire unionised permanent staff, and though these may be in a minority they can account for the majority of a plant’s wage bill, lifting the average pay across all workers to Chinese levels. The labour situation is a long way from the strikes and militancy of the 1970s, but it is unpredictable. That puts off potential manufacturers. And there are lots of other deterrents, too, from red tape to erratic electricity (see, for example, the monumental blackout across north and east India in 2012), a lack of land, bad roads and busy ports. One shipping boss thinks logistics add 20% to the cost of making something in India, compared with 6-8% in China. The Middle Kingdom hardly excelled on such metrics 20 years ago, but India does seem to be especially intimidating for industrial firms. Where non-labour problems have been tackled, notably in Gujarat, manufacturing does better. But Gujarat— population 60m—is not a big state by Indian standards. Since 2000 India has tried carving out special economic zones (SEZs) to create islands with lower taxes and access to infrastructure, where manufacturers can feel at home. But these have been a limited success, with many dominated by IT
  17. 17. firms. A new twist is a proposed industrial corridor between Delhi and Mumbai, inspired by the expressway between Seoul and Busan in South Korea. The project has Japanese support, but basic things such as access to land and water have yet to be settled. In its frustration India is flirting with a more overt industrial policy. A new rule says that government offices must now buy computers with a chunk of components made locally. This is designed to improve the balance of payments and promote an indigenous industry. The government is also now offering subsidies that could be worth billions of dollars to attract a microchip foundry. There is a push to indigenise the defence industry. The legislation on offer to try to change the situation more generally may not enthuse industry. There are noises about labour-law reform, but rather than liberalise the regime for permanent workers it may merely tighten the one for contract employees. A bill that is supposed to make it easier to buy land could make the process even more expensive and protracted, argue many businesspeople. For robust jobs growth there must be a change of mindset among officials, judges and politicians. Although Mr Gandhi and others are talking about the challenge, not everyone is, partly due to the electoral system’s skew towards the countryside. Only 10% of legislators in the lower house have urban constituencies in which 75% or more of the population is urban, reckons the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies (CSDS), a think-tank. Jobs in factories in cities are not a priority for most politicians.
  18. 18. Failing gently Could the voices of the young change this? There is a rising level of political involvement. A recent survey by CSDS and the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung, a German think-tank, found that nearly twice as many of today’s 18- to 33-year-olds say they are interested in politics as did in 1996. Some 20% of young rural men say they participate in protests, as do 22% of college-educated young men. Those with exposure to the media, from talk shows to social media, are most politically active. One of India’s big mobile-messaging sites, Nimbuzz, with 25m mostly young users, says traffic doubled in the aftermath of the rape scandal in Delhi in December and during the Anna Hazare anti-graft protests. But the young have little independent political identity; their party allegiance is much like that of their parents. Nor do they have any obvious muscle.
  19. 19. The lack of political resolve and of a clear signal from voters mean India is unlikely to summon up the single-minded dedication with which South Korea, Taiwan and China created industrial jobs. Its demographic dividend will yield only a fraction of what it could, and the problem of low-quality employment will fester. That would be an immense waste. Most policymakers and well-off people would deny that it is a deep threat, though. The country’s religions, its distinctive mix of hierarchical culture and populist politics and its durable family structures will ensure social stability, they say. They are probably right. They might want to pay their security guards a little more, though. Just in case. Familiar Energy and the environment recruitment agencies list Energy  ATA Energy - Recruitment Agency Recruitment consultancy, sourcing engineering and technical professionals for the Energy, Power Generation and Oil & Gas sectors.  Acre Successful recruitment agency that focusses on placing candidates into the alternative energy sphere. Includes sustainability, renewables and energy efficiency.  Allen & York Allen & York is a market leading specialist Recruitment Company serving the Environment, Planning & Built Environment, Energy and Health & Safety sectors  Astute Technical Recruitment Renewable energy recruitment consultant  Barker Ross - Recruitment Agency for Energy With 20 years of experience in the industry Barker Ross offer tailor recruitment for clients.  Bond Recruitment Specialists in renewable energies.  Burns Carlton - Recruitment Agency A recruitment agency with offices in London and Leeds, Burns Carlton focuses on the following areas: energy, financial and professional services, healthcare, retail and human resources.  Clarehill Associates Specialise in engineering & technical recruitment, focussing on UK roles.  Cripps Sears - Recruitment Agency International Executive Search in Energy & Natural Resources, Infrastructure and Professional Services. With offices in London, Edinburgh, Paris, Houston, Singapore and Perth.  Eden Scott Scotland based renewable energy and environmental recruitment agency.
  20. 20.  Envirogen Recruitment Solutions Source positions within the UK and Worldwide renewable energy markets.  Environmental Recruitment and Renewable Energy Jobs Recruitment consultancy focussed on the environmental sector, specialising in the areas of renewable energy, environmental consultants, and sustainability consultants.  Eurostaff Group Ltd Specialist recruitment consultants in renewable energy including: Wind, Tidal, Bioenergy, Solar, Energy Management, Sustainability, Microrenewables, Hydrogen.  Fircroft - Recruitment Agency A recruitment agency that provide specialist technical industries, active in over 40 countries worldwide.  Granger Reis - Recruitment Agency Specialise in construction, engineering, property, accountancy and finance and professional services.  Grosvenor Clive and Stokes - Recruitment Agency A recruitment agency working primarily in the Energy & Infrastructure, Professional Services and Technology, Media & Telecoms sectors. Offices are located in London.  Hays Energy Specialise in utilities, power generation, oil and gas or petrochemical sectors.  Insight Recruitment Recruitment agency based across UK, Europe and Asia specialising in banking, finance, energy trading and HR recruitment  Maxwell Drummond - Recruitment Agency Maxwell Drummond International is a retained search consultancy offering professional search services to global clients in all sectors of the energy and natural resources industries. Has offices in London, Aberdeen, Rio de Janeiro, Singapore, Houston and Calgary.  NES Global Provides engineering services and specialist staff support solutions to its worldwide client base across the Oil & Gas, Power Generation and Infrastructure markets.  Networkers International Plc Specialising in the delivery of resource solutions to the market of renewable energy, both permanent and part time.  Piedmont Ltd - Recruitment Agency A recruitment agency working specifically in the areas of financial services, energy, non-profit and venture capital and private equity. Main office is in London with an office also in Dubai.  Preng & Associates - Recruitment Agency Preng and Associates is the world's most accomplished executive search firm specializing in meeting the unique management leadership requirements of the energy and natural resources industries. The company was founded in 1980 and has three offices: Houston, US; London, UK; and Moscow, Russia.  Principal Search - Recruitment Agency A recruitment agency working in Energy & Commodities, Asset & Private Wealth Management, Investment Banking and Corporate Finance & Private Equity sectors. Offices in London.  RC Consultants - Recruitment Agency RC Consultants is an energy recruitment consultancy. Based in Norway, but with offices in the UK and Poland.  Ruston WHEB Executive search firm dedicated to the renewable energy and clean technology sectors  Spencer Ogden Specialised recruitment agency that place graduates and experienced hire candidates into positions into conventional and alternative energy field.  SpenglerFox - Recruitment Agency A global recruitment agency with networks around the world, with core practices in retail, life sciences, manufacturing and energy.
  21. 21.  The Curzon Partnership - Recruitment Agency The Curzon Partnership LLP is an independent executive search firm serving clients in the key sectors of Energy, Infrastructure and Finance. Offices based in London, but may be able to offer international opportunities.  leap29 - Recruitment Agency Supply candidates who have the skills to develop technologies that limit the impact on the environment.

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