Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
MAC 196: Multiplatform Radio & Audio.
* Scripts help give shape, structure and direction* You can say what you mean to mean to say* Nothing gets left out* Gives...
* Write for the EAR not the EYE* Spoken, not written* Conversational English* Think: “How would I say this?”* Different gr...
* Sets-up your feature, interview, vox-pop* Written by the reporter/producer* Guides the listener in. Gives background or ...
Type the script and title/date itDouble line spacing and tabbed to the right (not centre)Clear font – print black on white...
*   Title (as in RCS) / Reporter / Feature Producer*   TX Date*   This is the first of the line of the script. It should g...
* Cue – scripted introduction read by presenter* Actuality – sounds from location used to illustrate* FX – Sound Effects o...
* Write a cue to introduce your vox-pop or your mixed interview…* What do you need to say?* How do you explain what’s comi...
Writing for Radio
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Writing for Radio

1,249 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

Writing for Radio

  1. 1. MAC 196: Multiplatform Radio & Audio.
  2. 2. * Scripts help give shape, structure and direction* You can say what you mean to mean to say* Nothing gets left out* Gives a sense of style and consistency of voice* Tells a better story
  3. 3. * Write for the EAR not the EYE* Spoken, not written* Conversational English* Think: “How would I say this?”* Different grammar* Write for one person – LISTENER not Listeners* Think about colour, language and flow* Substitute words that don’t work* ALWAYS read it outloud
  4. 4. * Sets-up your feature, interview, vox-pop* Written by the reporter/producer* Guides the listener in. Gives background or provokes curiosity…* Line 1 – grabs attention and gives the basics* Line 2 – gives more details and reveals the story* Lines 3 & 4 – leads into the story
  5. 5. Type the script and title/date itDouble line spacing and tabbed to the right (not centre)Clear font – print black on white plain paperPoint 12 – 14Use CAPITALS or underlining for stressed or keywordsUse [PHO-NET-IC] spellings for difficult wordsAdd duration e.g. 2’20”Add the “Out-cue” = last words/soundsSpell check and read out-loudBe prepared to re-write it
  6. 6. * Title (as in RCS) / Reporter / Feature Producer* TX Date* This is the first of the line of the script. It should grab the listener’s attention quickly* The second paragraph will add more detail, such as why the piece is important* And the final paragraph will introduce us to the piece and the reporter* Title/ID Number* IN: First words or sounds* OUT: Last words or sounds* DUR: How long the piece is
  7. 7. * Cue – scripted introduction read by presenter* Actuality – sounds from location used to illustrate* FX – Sound Effects or actuality (usage: FX fades)* Out-Cue – The last words or sounds on a piece* Voicer / Voice Piece – a report with narration only* Package – A report with links and clips* TX – Transmission (usage: TX: 29/11/11)* ID Number – the unique number of the audio in RCS Linker
  8. 8. * Write a cue to introduce your vox-pop or your mixed interview…* What do you need to say?* How do you explain what’s coming up?* Do you need to back announce anything?* Make the scripts AT LEAST 2 paragraphs long.

×