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Hardwired inhibitions vpp16

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Why do people stand idly by as their coworkers do things that are clearly unsafe and say nothing when they know that they should? This presentation provides an overview of some of the more significant but often overlooked cognitive and social factors that suppress safety interventions and describes some significant first steps that organizations can take to move beyond "stop work authority" and address the hidden, but very real forces that keep their employees silent in the face of obvious risk.

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Hardwired inhibitions vpp16

  1. 1. Hardwired Inhibitions Phillip Ragain
  2. 2. Why We Stay Silent How often do people speak up when they see something they think is unsafe?
  3. 3. Why We Stay Silent People speak up only 39% of the time. (2010 Study of Safety Intervention) Read the Study in EHS Today http://ehstoday.com/safety/management/study-safety-intervention-0701
  4. 4. Why We Stay Silent What keeps us from speaking up? Silence.
  5. 5. Why We Stay Silent Stop Work Authority Does it fix the problem?
  6. 6. Why We Stay Silent Stop Work Authority 97% of respondents said that they were given the authority to stop work at their company. (2010 Study of Safety Intervention)
  7. 7. Why We Stay Silent Stop Work Authority It only addresses one of the factors that keep us from speaking up: Fear of formal punishment for insubordination or slowing productivity.
  8. 8. Why We Stay Silent Safety “Intervention” Most people take this responsibility very seriously and believe that they would speak up… …but in the moment, they usually say nothing.
  9. 9. Why We Stay Silent The “Context Effect” What we think about, care about and remember is determined by our immediate context.
  10. 10. Why We Stay Silent The “Context Effect” The production context is different from the safety meeting context.
  11. 11. Why We Stay Silent Inhibiting Forces: Production Pressure It literally changes the way we see the world.
  12. 12. Why We Stay Silent Inhibiting Forces: The Unit Bias We are strongly inclined to finish a given unit or task before changing what we are doing.
  13. 13. Why We Stay Silent Inhibiting Forces: Deference to Authority We don’t always speak up to authorities…or around authorities.
  14. 14. Why We Stay Silent Inhibiting Forces: Bystander Effect The more people there are, the less likely we are to speak up.
  15. 15. Why We Stay Silent “The Perfect Storm” Even when there is no production pressure, authority figure, unit bias or group of people inhibiting us, there is something else that can keep us silent in the face of disaster.
  16. 16. Why We Stay Silent Reactance Social Incongruence Confirmation Bias + +
  17. 17. Why We Stay Silent Reactance Social Incongruence Confirmation Bias + +
  18. 18. Why We Stay Silent Reactance The urge to resist or do the opposite of what someone tells you to do.
  19. 19. Why We Stay Silent Reactance Social Incongruence Confirmation Bias + +
  20. 20. Why We Stay Silent Social Incongruence The stress that we feel when we are in tension with others.
  21. 21. Why We Stay Silent Reactance Social Incongruence Confirmation Bias + +
  22. 22. Why We Stay Silent Confirmation Bias We are extremely good at justifying what we have already concluded.
  23. 23. Why We Stay Silent Confirmation Bias “No one else has said anything, so it must not be that big of a deal.”
  24. 24. Why We Stay Silent Confirmation Bias “He is an experienced employee. He knows the risk he’s taking.”
  25. 25. Why We Stay Silent Confirmation Bias “It won’t make a difference if I do speak up.”
  26. 26. Overcoming the Inhibitors Can we be rewired? Just being aware of these biases goes a long way. 1
  27. 27. Overcoming the Inhibitors Can we be rewired? When we are confident that we can speak up w i t h o u t p r o d u c i n g defensiveness (“reactance”), w e s t o p “ re a s o n i n g backwards.” Reactance Social Incongruence Confirmation Bias ➡ ➡ 2
  28. 28. Hardwired Inhibitions Phillip Ragain
  29. 29. Resources for You theradgroup.com/vpp-16 Access Slides Ask Questions Michael Allen 17th @ 11:30 18th @ 2:45 Mike Allen 17th @ 1:45 & 3:00 18th @ 10:00 & 1:15 Ron Ragain 17th @ 11:30 & 1:45 Phillip Ragain 18th @ 1:15 & 2:45

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