Migrating Traditional Apps from On-Premises to the Hybrid Cloud

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Re-architecting legacy apps for the public cloud is very resource intensive. However, migrating apps to a hosted hybrid cloud that’s composed of bare-metal servers, VMware® virtualization, EMC® storage and public cloud offers cloud-bursting benefits, but with less risk and cost. Check out our presentation and learn the five-step path to hybrid cloud.

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  • Jaret has over 14 years in the industry with 12 of those years in operations ranging from programming, systems administration, network engineering and information security. He has been with Rackspace for 6 ½ years now and his current focus as an enterprise cloud solutions architect is making sure Rackspace customers understand how to leverage the Rackspace cloud properly, as well as making sure our internal teams from support to product and sales are all aligned to deliver the outcomes you all expect from us.
  • Let’s look at how the average enterprise IT staff manages their large VMware environment.

    They can write scripts to automate tasks like VM provisioning.

    They prefer to interact with their VMware environment via GUIs or command line interfaces. Most of them do not code to APIs and aren’t trained up on DevOps. Their skill set is based around managing client-server apps, the OS and virtualization layers, and the underlying hardware.

    The team is familiar with managing and operating vSphere VMs via VMware vCenter and compatible tools like vConsole and vCOPs.


  • Let’s look at how the average enterprise IT staff manages their large VMware environment.

    They can write scripts to automate tasks like VM provisioning.

    They prefer to interact with their VMware environment via GUIs or command line interfaces. Most of them do not code to APIs and aren’t trained up on DevOps. Their skill set is based around managing client-server apps, the OS and virtualization layers, and the underlying hardware.

    The team is familiar with managing and operating vSphere VMs via VMware vCenter and compatible tools like vConsole and vCOPs.


  • Let’s look at how the average enterprise IT staff manages their large VMware environment.

    They can write scripts to automate tasks like VM provisioning.

    They prefer to interact with their VMware environment via GUIs or command line interfaces. Most of them do not code to APIs and aren’t trained up on DevOps. Their skill set is based around managing client-server apps, the OS and virtualization layers, and the underlying hardware.

    The team is familiar with managing and operating vSphere VMs via VMware vCenter and compatible tools like vConsole and vCOPs.


  • Let’s look at how the average enterprise IT staff manages their large VMware environment.

    They can write scripts to automate tasks like VM provisioning.

    They prefer to interact with their VMware environment via GUIs or command line interfaces. Most of them do not code to APIs and aren’t trained up on DevOps. Their skill set is based around managing client-server apps, the OS and virtualization layers, and the underlying hardware.

    The team is familiar with managing and operating vSphere VMs via VMware vCenter and compatible tools like vConsole and vCOPs.


  • The legacy apps aren’t going anywhere. They comprise the majority of the workloads, but devs are cranking out new apps that have been architected for web-scale. These apps are built around worloads such as big data, mobile, and SaaS. VMware powers the client-server apps, while the new apps are finding homes in public clouds, often in the form of rouge IT.
  • Let’s look at how the average enterprise IT staff manages their large VMware environment.

    They can write scripts to automate tasks like VM provisioning.

    They prefer to interact with their VMware environment via GUIs or command line interfaces. Most of them do not code to APIs and aren’t trained up on DevOps. Their skill set is based around managing client-server apps, the OS and virtualization layers, and the underlying hardware.

    The team is familiar with managing and operating vSphere VMs via VMware vCenter and compatible tools like vConsole and vCOPs.


  • Let’s look at how the average enterprise IT staff manages their large VMware environment.

    They can write scripts to automate tasks like VM provisioning.

    They prefer to interact with their VMware environment via GUIs or command line interfaces. Most of them do not code to APIs and aren’t trained up on DevOps. Their skill set is based around managing client-server apps, the OS and virtualization layers, and the underlying hardware.

    The team is familiar with managing and operating vSphere VMs via VMware vCenter and compatible tools like vConsole and vCOPs.


  • Let’s look at how the average enterprise IT staff manages their large VMware environment.

    They can write scripts to automate tasks like VM provisioning.

    They prefer to interact with their VMware environment via GUIs or command line interfaces. Most of them do not code to APIs and aren’t trained up on DevOps. Their skill set is based around managing client-server apps, the OS and virtualization layers, and the underlying hardware.

    The team is familiar with managing and operating vSphere VMs via VMware vCenter and compatible tools like vConsole and vCOPs.


  • Let’s look at how the average enterprise IT staff manages their large VMware environment.

    They can write scripts to automate tasks like VM provisioning.

    They prefer to interact with their VMware environment via GUIs or command line interfaces. Most of them do not code to APIs and aren’t trained up on DevOps. Their skill set is based around managing client-server apps, the OS and virtualization layers, and the underlying hardware.

    The team is familiar with managing and operating vSphere VMs via VMware vCenter and compatible tools like vConsole and vCOPs.


  • Let’s look at how the average enterprise IT staff manages their large VMware environment.

    They can write scripts to automate tasks like VM provisioning.

    They prefer to interact with their VMware environment via GUIs or command line interfaces. Most of them do not code to APIs and aren’t trained up on DevOps. Their skill set is based around managing client-server apps, the OS and virtualization layers, and the underlying hardware.

    The team is familiar with managing and operating vSphere VMs via VMware vCenter and compatible tools like vConsole and vCOPs.


  • The legacy apps aren’t going anywhere. They comprise the majority of the workloads, but devs are cranking out new apps that have been architected for web-scale. These apps are built around worloads such as big data, mobile, and SaaS. VMware powers the client-server apps, while the new apps are finding homes in public clouds, often in the form of rouge IT.
  • The legacy apps aren’t going anywhere. They comprise the majority of the workloads, but devs are cranking out new apps that have been architected for web-scale. These apps are built around worloads such as big data, mobile, and SaaS. VMware powers the client-server apps, while the new apps are finding homes in public clouds, often in the form of rouge IT.
  • The legacy apps aren’t going anywhere. They comprise the majority of the workloads, but devs are cranking out new apps that have been architected for web-scale. These apps are built around worloads such as big data, mobile, and SaaS. VMware powers the client-server apps, while the new apps are finding homes in public clouds, often in the form of rouge IT.
  • The legacy apps aren’t going anywhere. They comprise the majority of the workloads, but devs are cranking out new apps that have been architected for web-scale. These apps are built around worloads such as big data, mobile, and SaaS. VMware powers the client-server apps, while the new apps are finding homes in public clouds, often in the form of rouge IT.
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