Monochromatic Pop Art Celebrity Portraits

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By Rachel Thomas
2010

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Monochromatic Pop Art Celebrity Portraits

  1. 1. Andy Warhol <br />One of the founders of Pop Art (& probably the most well-known of all time)<br />Subjects = Iconographic American things like soup cans, Coke bottles, celebrities, etc. <br />
  2. 2. Screenprinting 101<br />Screen Printing – Stencil process where the image is put on a screen, the blank areas are covered, and ink is forced thru the screen onto the printing surface.<br />Warhol & Rauschenberg both used screen printing to paint on canvases <br />Why Screen printing? MASS PRODUCTION!<br />
  3. 3. Campbell’s Soup<br />
  4. 4. Campbell’s Soup<br />
  5. 5. Coca-Cola Bottles<br />
  6. 6. “Beauties in photography are different than beauties in person.”<br />Warhol Celebrity Portraits<br />“In the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes.<br />
  7. 7. Marilyn Monroe<br />
  8. 8. Marilyn Monroe<br />
  9. 9. Elizabeth Taylor<br />
  10. 10. John Wayne<br />
  11. 11. Wicked Witch<br />
  12. 12. Mick Jagger<br />
  13. 13. Elvis Presley<br />
  14. 14. Muhammad Ali <br />
  15. 15. …Review…<br /> What were the subjects of Warhol’s art? <br /> Pop culture – products, objects, celebrities <br /> Why did he choose these subjects?<br /> A commentary on popular culture – mass marketing, <br /> consumerism, etc. <br /> What art process is Warhol known for & what is <br /> it? <br /> Screen Printing - printmaking process where a stencil is stuck <br /> to a screen, then the ink is pushed through onto the printing <br /> surface in the designated areas <br />
  16. 16. Project: <br />Monochromatic Celebrity Portraits<br />
  17. 17. Project Steps<br />Monochromatic Value Scales (3) <br />
  18. 18. Monochromatic<br /><ul><li>Consisting of only one color or hue – includes tints and shades of the color.</li></ul> Shade<br /><ul><li>Darker version of a color – made by adding black</li></ul> Tint <br /><ul><li>Lighterversion of a color – made by adding white</li></li></ul><li>STARTING COLOR<br />TINTS<br />SHADES<br />ADD <br />WHITE <br />TO <br />STARTING <br />COLOR<br />ADD <br />BLACK<br />TO <br />STARTING <br />COLOR<br />STARTING COLOR<br />
  19. 19. Student Examples<br />
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  21. 21.
  22. 22.
  23. 23. Procedure…<br />
  24. 24. STEP 1<br />Grid photograph into even squares, each somewhere around ½ to 1-inch. Take note of the length and width (ex: 7 x 10 inches). <br />(7 in)<br /><------------------------------------------------><br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />6<br />7<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />6<br />7<br />8<br />9<br />10<br /><---------------------------------------------------------------------><br />(10 in)<br />
  25. 25. STEP 2<br />Grid off your paper to scale with the photograph. <br />7 x 10 (1 x 1 in. squares)<br />7 x 10 (2 x 2-in. squares)<br />
  26. 26. STEP 3<br />Look for the different values in your photo. Outline them with a pencil. <br />(CLOSE-UP)<br />
  27. 27. STEP 4<br />Draw image onto paper, including value areas marked in STEP 3. <br />
  28. 28. STEP 5<br />Refer to your value scale. Start by painting the darkest values first, then lighter and lighter up the scale. <br />

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