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Educ. Tech.

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Made by our Instructor
Student : Rachelle P. Pascual
Course : Bachelor of Elementary Education
School : Laguna State Polytechnic University SC
Education 5A : Educational Technology
Instructor : Ms. Rachel Joyce B. Aseoche

Published in: Education, Technology
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Educ. Tech.

  1. 1. Garo, Candelaria D., Teaching Educational Technology First year of publication Published by National Bookstore Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo HISTORY OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY
  2. 2. EDUCATION DURING THE ANCIENT TIMES - Educational technology seems to be the phenomenon of the 21st century ANCIENT CIVILIZATION - Men started to use pointed sticks to inscript signs and symbols on the leaves of trees and knives for the bark of tree - 3,100 B.C. the Egyptians devised a system of picture writing called hieroglyphicsGaro, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo
  3. 3. EDUCATION DURING THE ANCIENT TIMES - Hieroglyphics symbols usually represent a sound or a group of sounds - Scribes, a group of men trained in the art of writing ANCIENT GREECE Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo - Spartan Education emphasized the development of physical body coupled with discipline
  4. 4. EDUCATION DURING THE ANCIENT TIMES - Paidonomus, military commander in the public barracks. ATHENS Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo - Athens, recognition is given for its being first to recognize the right of the individual to develop to the fullest
  5. 5. EDUCATION DURING THE ANCIENT TIMES - Activities to develop both were the prime concerns in the music schools, the grammar schools and the public Gymnasiums or Palaestra Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo - Effective instructional materials were designed and implemented (with the help of Sophist Cognitive Rules)
  6. 6. EDUCATION DURING THE MEDIEVAL ERA - Medieval University was an important milestone in educational development - Emperor Frederick I of bologna in 1158 chartered the First University Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo - Degrees offered were expanded which required students 1. to engage in more in depth studies and to write their theses 2. defend them in public before the deans, faculties and rectors.
  7. 7. EDUCATION DURING THE MEDIEVAL ERA - Saracens or the Arabs among the Moors of Spain gave a significant contribution in determining the direction of what educational technology is today. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo - Curriculum was the most organized and complete in the Elementary, Secondary and Collegiate Level - Scientific Method of teaching
  8. 8. EDUCATION DURING THE RENAISSANCE PERIOD - Three Main lines of Concern: 1. Intellectual to which education belongs 2. Aesthetic 3. Scientific Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo - Humanism, Reformation, Realism, Disciplinism, and Rationalism - Bacon, Rabelais, Vives, and Milton - John Locke (tabula rasa) - Johann Amos Comenius (Orbis Pictus) - Maria Montessori – Multi-sensory materials to teaching
  9. 9. EDUCATION DURING THE AGE OF NATURALISM - Jean Jacques Rouseau (Emiled) Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo - The aim of education was the preservation of the natural goodness of the individual and the formation of society based upon the recognition of natural individual (Lacuesta et.al. 1986)- Herbart (five formal steps to teaching known as Herbatian Method of Teaching- 1. preparation 2. preparation 3. comparison 4. abstraction 5. generation and application
  10. 10. EDUCATION DURING THE AGE OF NATURALISM - Peztallozi (actual objects that involves most of the senses) Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo - Froebel (Father of Kindergarten) - Use of actual objects - Recommended the use of play and songs
  11. 11. EDUCATIONAL MOVEMENTS IN THE 19TH CENTURY -John Dewey (Pragmatist) - Edward Lee Thorndike Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo - The development of effective educational technology (production of books, the use of blackboard, improvements of writing implements like pen and ink
  12. 12. EDUCATIONAL MOVEMENTS IN THE 19TH CENTURY - Photography was invented Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo - Visual instruction - Visual Media became widely accepted - Educational films were used as instructional media- First instructional television program - American soldiers showed the importance of educational devices such as movies filmstrip, radio and other pictorial devices.
  13. 13. EDUCATION IN COMTEMPORARY TIMES - Computerization of Records Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo - Entrance procedures - Aspects of administration and supervision - Multi – media Resources and computers are common fixtures
  14. 14. EDUCATION IN COMTEMPORARY TIMES - The computer Units are being installed to be shared by the whole studentry Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo - Collegiate level and secondary levels, graduate level have radically revised and enriched their curricular offerings to include course in computer applications
  15. 15. EDUCATION IN COMTEMPORARY TIMES - Private Elementary Schools offer computer lessons as early as in the elementary grades Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo - CAI - multi-media presentations to make teaching and learning more interesting and effective- Educational Organizations (INTEL, UP NISMED)
  16. 16. EDUCATION IN COMTEMPORARY TIMES - Internet and the E-mail have become tools for what is known as fast-paced interactive learning communication and search for information Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo - Computers became more user friendly
  17. 17. MEANING OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY
  18. 18. MEANINGOFEDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY Educational Technology is the development, application and evaluation of systems, techniques and aids to improve the process of human learning Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo Educational Technology is a systematic way of designing, implementing and evaluating the total learning and teaching in terms of specific objectives based on research in human learning and communication; and employing a combination of human and non-human resources
  19. 19. MEANINGOFEDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY to bring about more effective instruction Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo Simply stated, educational technology is the application of the results of researches and studies, material or non-material to improve teaching and learning continuation…
  20. 20. Our Definition: “A combination of the processes and tools involved in addressing educational needs and problems, with an emphasis on applying the most current tools: computers and their related technologies.” (M. D. Roblyer, 2000) MEANINGOFEDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo
  21. 21. Has technology changed how and what we teach? MEANINGOFEDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo
  22. 22. Change in educational philosophy of what constitutes basic skills  No longer just three R’s  “Learning to learn” skills essential  Lifelong learning Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo MEANINGOFEDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY
  23. 23. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo MEANINGOFEDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY What We’ve Learned… Development of technology materials and integration strategies is time intensive and should not be a classroom teacher’s primary responsibility
  24. 24. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo MEANINGOFEDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY What We’ve Learned… Educators must keep pace with technological advances. But often times technology changes faster than the educational environment.
  25. 25. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo MEANINGOFEDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY What We’ve Learned… Teachers will always be necessary! Definition of learning environments are changing.
  26. 26. Identity of classrooms must change. Our models of effective instruction must change too! Educators must be more than: Sage on the Stage Guide on the Side Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo MEANINGOFEDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY
  27. 27. MEANINGOFEDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY EDTECH TO OTHER AIDS OF TEACHING Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Candelaria D. Garo Media is very much a part and parcel of educational technology. On the other hand, audio-visual materials refer to the instructional aids that appeal to the auditory and sight senses which could be personally prepared by the teacher for a specific learning tasks and group of learners.
  28. 28. ROLES AND FUNCTIONS OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY
  29. 29. ROLESANDFUNCTIONSOFEDTECH Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright If the educational technology are properly used, instructional materials can do the following: 1. Arouse and sustain the interest and attention of the pupils/students to learn. 2. Concretize abstract concepts/ideas to promote meaningful learning. 3. Makes learning more permanent because of the rich experiences that they provide
  30. 30. ROLESANDFUNCTIONSOFEDTECH Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 4. Provide self-activities for independent learning 5. Increase vocabulary by eliminating verbalism6. Develop continuity of thought 7. Increase the quality of learning while decreasing the time spent 8. Check pupil preparedness 9. Make learning more interactive, hence learning is improved
  31. 31. ROLESANDFUNCTIONSOFEDTECH Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright GUIDELINES IN THE SELECTION OF INTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS 1. Size 2. Color 3. Durability 4. Economy 5. Easy to handle 6. Relevance 7. Novelty
  32. 32. EDUCATIONAL MEDIA IDENTIFICATION SELECTION PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright
  33. 33. It is a visual analogy which is used as a guide by teachers in choosing WHAT, WHY AND HOW much instructional material they should use to provoke learning with the most satisfying results. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright
  34. 34. Cone of Experience Direct, Purposeful Experiences Contrived Experiences Dramatized Experiences Demonstrations Field Trips Television Motion Pictures Recordings, Radio, Still Pictures Visual Symbols Verbal Symbols Exhibits
  35. 35. The cone is based on the relationships of various educational experiences to reality (real life), and the bottom level of the cone, "direct purposeful experiences," represents reality or the closest things to real, everyday life. Principles on the cone of Experience: The opportunity for a learner to use a variety or several senses (sight, smell, hearing, touching, movement) is considered in the cone.
  36. 36. Direct experience allows us to use all senses.  Verbal symbols involve only hearing. The more sensory channels possible in interacting with a resource, the better the chance that many students can learn from it. Each level of the cone above its base moves a learner a step further away from real- life experiences, so experiences focusing only on The use of verbal symbols are the
  37. 37. Motion pictures (also television) is where it is on the cone because it is an observational experience with little or no opportunity to participate or use senses other than seeing and hearing. Contrived experiences are ones that are highly participatory and simulate real life situations or activities. Dramatized experiences are defined as experiences in which the learner acts out a role or activity.
  38. 38. What are the implications of the Cone of Experience in the teaching-learning process?
  39. 39. 1. We do not use only one medium of communication in isolation. Rather we use many instructional materials to help the student conceptualize his experience. …implications of the Cone of Experience in the teaching-learning process…
  40. 40. 2 We avoid teaching directly at the symbolic level of thought without adequate foundation of the concrete. Students' concepts will lack deep roots in direct experience Dale cautions us when he said "These rootless experiences will not have the generative power to produce additional concepts and will not enable the learner to deal with the new situations that he faces" (Dale, 1969) …implications of the Cone of Experience in the teaching-learning process…
  41. 41. 3.When teaching, we don't get stuck in the concrete. Let us strive to bring our students to the symbolic or abstract level to develop their higher order thinking skills. …implications of the Cone of Experience in the teaching-learning process…
  42. 42. Three pitfalls that teachers should avoid with regard to the use of the Cone of Experience: using one medium in isolation. moving to the abstract without an adequate foundation of concrete experience. getting stuck in the concrete without moving to the abstract hampering the development of our students' higher thinking skills.
  43. 43. THIRD THROUGH A SERIES OF SYMBOLS SYMBOLIC SECOND THROUGH A SERIES OF ILLUSTRATIONS ICONIC FIRST THROUGH A SEQUENCE OF ACTIONS ENACTIVE BRUNER’S THREE- FOLD ANALYSIS OF EXPERIENCE
  44. 44. BRUNER’S THREE- FOLD ANALYSIS OF EXPERIENCE ICONIC SYMBOLIC ENACTIVE INCREASING ABSTRACTION HENCE INCREASING DIFFICULTY
  45. 45. • The BRUNER’S THREE-FOLD ANALYSIS suggests • that learning is more impressive if one proceeds from the concrete to abstract, or from specific to general because more senses are involved and the relationships are built in a more pronounced manner.
  46. 46. If we want out students to remember and master what was taught, we cannot ignore what the Cone of Experience reminds us to make use of a combination of as many learning resources as we can and to proceed to the abstract only after we have presented the concrete. Do we have to end in the abstract'? Or should the abstract lead us again to the concrete and the concrete to the abstract again? So learning is from the concrete to the abstract, from the abstract to the concrete and from the
  47. 47. PICTORIAL MEDIA Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by
  48. 48. - Still pictures - Flat pictures are representations of objects or things on a flat surface Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by - A flat picture, also called an image, is a group of colored points on a flat surface that looks the same as something else.
  49. 49. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Where can Flat Pictures be found? NEWS, MAGAZINES, ADVERTISEMENT, POSTERS, PAMPHLETS
  50. 50. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by GUIDELINES TO TEACHING WITH PICTURES 1. Pictures must be clearly seen by everyone. 2. Students/pupils must be given a chance to point out what they think are the important aspect of the picture.
  51. 51. 3. The teacher must supplement pupils’ comments to make sure that nothing has been omitted 4. The teacher and pupils should discuss together what they find in the picture. 5. The picture used in class should lead to the accumulation of related pictures in the textbook. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by GUIDELINES TO TEACHING WITH PICTURES
  52. 52. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by GUIDELINES TO TEACHING WITH PICTURES 6. If the picture used in class stirs the pupils to attempt at illustrating their own, it is good evidence that a sound use has been made of them. 7. Pictures ought to supply incentives for the use of auxiliary aids, like motion pictures, filmstrip and others.
  53. 53. 8. Pictures ought to promote supplementary GUIDELINES TO TEACHING WITH PICTURES Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by
  54. 54. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by A picture can be read in four levels as follows: 1. Enumerative level 2. Descriptive level 3. Interpretative level 4. Integrative level
  55. 55. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by
  56. 56. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by How to make pictures? Using cameras for pictures Before cameras
  57. 57. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Where can pictures be put? What are the examples of flat picture?
  58. 58. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Teachers should choose those the suggest motion or the candid shots, as they are more interesting and life-like
  59. 59. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Uses? 1. To illustrate concepts and to show examples of what you are talking about during a lecture when you can't visit the real thing
  60. 60. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Uses? 2. To inspire discussion of a topic, looking at multiple aspects and contexts
  61. 61. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Uses? 3. To enforce and extend language and common terms of the object being discussed, using subject- specific terminology
  62. 62. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Uses? 4. To categorize within a subject discipline and potentially build reference collections for student project work and research
  63. 63. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Uses? To stimulate students writing a story/poem about that image - enhancing creative and language skills
  64. 64. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Uses? To encourage team work and foster collaboration and the sharing of a learning experience
  65. 65. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Uses? To encourage critical thinking skills To illustrate case studies To enhance visual communication skills To help identify emotions and mood
  66. 66. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Uses? To document an event and analyse practiceTo assess students' knowledge, understanding and observational skills As a prompt to get students to research all aspects of a topic
  67. 67. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Uses? To document an event and analyse practiceTo assess students' knowledge, understanding and observational skills As a prompt to get students to research all aspects of a topic
  68. 68. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Illustrations are non-photographic
  69. 69. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by INSTRUCTIONAL ROLES OF USING ILLUSTRATIONS IN THE CLASSROOM Attention Retention Understanding Context
  70. 70. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by
  71. 71. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Purposes for which flat pictures, photographs, and illustrations can be used for teaching… 1. To CONCRETIZE words and symbols 2. To lend meaning to what one reads 3. To introduce or motivate 4. To correct misconceptions 5. To summarize a unit 6. To arouse emotions
  72. 72. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Flashcards are valuable materials for drill activities particularly in the teaching of Mathematics, English, and Filipino.
  73. 73. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by CONSIDERATIONS 1. The flashcards must be bold and big enough to be seen everybody. 2. Flash the cards in a fast or snappy manner to develop fast thinking or response. This will enable the pupils to automatize response.
  74. 74. 3. Flash the cards from back to front. Write the answer at the back of each flashcard so that as you flash you can see the answer and thus you will be able to check if the response of the pupil is correct or not. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by CONSIDERATIONS
  75. 75. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by CONSIDERATIONS 4. Hold the flashcards firmly at your chest level. Take care not to hide the words or the math combinations written in it.
  76. 76. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Prepare the following pictorial media and be able to demonstrate their uses in a mock teaching…GROUP 1 Projected and non-projected still pictures GROUP 2 Photographs and illustrations GROUP 3 Flashcards
  77. 77. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by FLASH CARDS TEACHING STRATEGYCTD Strategy - used by special and regular education teachers.FLASH CARDS MATERIALS NEEDED: FLASHCARDS with… Question … Problem … Sight word...
  78. 78. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by STEPS Sit/stand comfortably facing your student Arrange the flashcards in the order you would like to present them. Starting with the first flashcard, hold it up so that your student can clearly see the front. Keep the back of the flashcard toward you so your child cannot see it
  79. 79. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by STEPS Read the flash cards front to your child Wait THREE FULL SECONDS (for the student answer) If the student gives a correct answer, place the correctly answered flash card in a pile on your left. If the student gives incorrect response or no response, tell him the correct answer, and place the flash cards in a pile on your right side.
  80. 80. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by STEPS After you have finished showing your child all of the flash cards, you may continue your flashcards teaching session by using the stack of incorrectly answered cards.
  81. 81. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by TIPS Keep the flash card session game-like and fun Take activity breaks from your flash card session as your student needs them Revive energy for study with a healthy snack Reward your student with a favorite physical activity Some of the nest motivators are free like hugs and cheers for a job well done
  82. 82. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by ACTIVITIES using FLASH CARDS Memory activities Drilling activities Identification activities
  83. 83. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by It reminds teachers that there are many types of learners within any one class.
  84. 84. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Buy them… Make them yourself… Students make them…
  85. 85. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by INSTRUCTIONAL ROLE OF USING ILLUSTRATIONSIllustration Function Attention Retention Understanding Context
  86. 86. References Duchastel, P.C. (1978) Illustrating Instructional Texts, Educational Technology, Nov. 1978. Fleming, M. & Levie, W. H. (1978) Instructional Message Design, Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Educational Technology Publication. Gagné, R.M. & Briggs, L.J. (1979) Principles of Instructional Design (Second Edition), New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston.
  87. 87. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by
  88. 88. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Visual materials Audio Visual Audio Visual materials Materials/software Equipment/ hardware Electronics
  89. 89. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by No –projected media Two dimensional instructional materials Three-dimensional instructional materials
  90. 90. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by
  91. 91. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Gain and hold the attention of the learner Provide visual aspects to a process or techniquesFocus attention on highlight of key point Create impact Facilities the understanding of abstract explanations
  92. 92. Garo, Candelaria D.;Teaching Educational Technology: First year of publication: Published by National Bookstore:Philippine Copyright 2004 by Provide a common fretwork of experience to a large numbers of learners Stimulate reality

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