Obsessive Compulsive Disorder<br />Can it be Fixed?<br />
IS OCD CRIPPLING?<br />OCD can be debilitating<br />Research shows it is a biological disorder<br />Can be caused by genet...
DEVIATIONS<br />Studies have shown that behavior is not normal<br />OCD consists of compulsions and cognitive rituals<br /...
WHO DOES IT AFFECT<br /><ul><li>More research is needed to     understand why it happens
Celibacy rate is higher in men
Young children suffer from it too
More men than women suffer from it
Women can be misdiagnosed due to depression symptoms
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  1. 1. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder<br />Can it be Fixed?<br />
  2. 2. IS OCD CRIPPLING?<br />OCD can be debilitating<br />Research shows it is a biological disorder<br />Can be caused by genetic, neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, neuropsychological, and biochemical factors (Turner, Beidel, and Nathan, 1985)<br />
  3. 3. DEVIATIONS<br />Studies have shown that behavior is not normal<br />OCD consists of compulsions and cognitive rituals<br />Onset occurs in late teen years and early adulthood.<br />
  4. 4. WHO DOES IT AFFECT<br /><ul><li>More research is needed to understand why it happens
  5. 5. Celibacy rate is higher in men
  6. 6. Young children suffer from it too
  7. 7. More men than women suffer from it
  8. 8. Women can be misdiagnosed due to depression symptoms
  9. 9. OCD symptoms can be found in other psychiatric conditions such as eating disorders, depression, schizophrenia, mental retardation, head trauma, and Parkinson’s Disease.</li></li></ul><li>Can Treatment Help?<br />Studies have been done to determine recovery<br />A two year follow-up study was conducted to see if there was a relapse<br />The clients had to want to change<br />Cognitive therapy (CT) and Exposure Plus Response Prevention (ERP) was used to treat OCD<br />
  10. 10. Did it work?<br /><ul><li> In order for this treatment to work the therapist has to be specifically trained in this field.
  11. 11. CT is a psychotherapy that helps the patient re train their thinking processes
  12. 12. ERP is when the patient is exposed to their fear and taught how to work through it
  13. 13. The therapist can work with the client directly to help the patient work through their thoughts and fears by talking about it as it occurs
  14. 14. The research done was thorough and every aspect was gone over in a very detailed way
  15. 15. After two years, less than 10% relapsed
  16. 16. Approximately 50% of the completer sample was rated as recovered (Whittal, Robichaud, Thordarson, and McLean, 2008)</li></li></ul><li>REFERENCES<br />Turner, S.M., Beidel, D.C., Nathan, R.S. (1985). Biological Factors in obsessive-compulsive disorders. Psychological Bulletin 97.3. Retrieved on March 20, 2011, from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/614369592/12E39A8191E532C679C/2?accountid=34899<br />Whittal, M.L., Robichaud, M., Thordarson, D., McLean, P.D. (2008). Group and individual treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder using cognitive therapy and exposure plus response prevention: A 2-year follow-up of two randomized trials. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 76.6. Retrieved on March 20, 2011, from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/614498640/fulltextwithgraphics/12E39A1772746DAC133/6?accountid=34899<br />Fals-Stewart, W., Lucente, S. (1994). Treating obsessive-compulsive disorder among substance abusers: A guide. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 8.1. Retrieved on March 20, 2011, from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/614315323/12E39A8191E532C679C/4?accountid=34899<br />Abramowitz, J.S. (1997). Effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder: A quantitative review. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 65.1. Retrieved on March 20, 2011, from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/614324334/12E39A8191E532C679C/6?accountid=34899<br />
  17. 17. References<br />Stokes, A. (2001). Review of the secret illness: Part one: Understanding obsessive compulsive disorder. Part two: Managing obsessive compulsive behavior in schools. Canadian Psychology 42.4. Retrieved on March 20, 2011, from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/614473192/12E39A8191E532C679C/13?accountid=34899<br />Foa, E.B., Kozak, M.J., Salkovskis, P.M., Coles, M.E., Amir, N. (1998). The validation of a new compulsive disorder scale: The obsessive compulsive inventory. Psychological Assessment 10.3. Retrievved on March 20, 2011, from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/614344789/12E39A8191E532C679C/15?accountid=34899<br />

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