Value

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  • Value: Light and Dark…relative to a given context
  • Achromatic Gray…made with black and white
  • Value Contrast: Refers to the relationship between areas of dark and light. -Low-Value Contrast: The contrast between two adjoining areas is slight -Scientists have found that the human eye can perceive up to 40 variations in value
  • Low-Value Contrast
  • High-Value Contrast
  • Value Pattern: The arrangement and the amount of variation in light and dark, independent of the colors used.When value contrast is minimized and all the values are within a limited range with only small variation… HIGH KEY=Composition dominated by lights LOW KEY=Composition dominated by darksHere  LOW KEY…dominated by darks, dramatic, theatrical. Works with subject matter…typical of Baroque artists
  • HIGH KEY COMPOSITION…few contrasting dark areas
  • LOW KEY COMPOSITION…meditative, very calm
  • Value  Used to suggest volume or spaceChiaroscuro: During the Renaissance, this term was coined to describe the artistic device of using light and dark to imply depth and volume in a painting or drawing. -Combination of the two Italian words “chiaro”, meaning light, and “scuro”, the word for dark. -Characterized by strong contrasts between light and dark, usually bold contrasts affecting a whole composition
  • Film Noir…uses subtle light to create dramatic emphasis
  • chiaroscuro
  • Atmospheric Perspective: Aerial Perspective
  • Atmospheric Perspective: Aerial Perspective
  • Atmospheric Perspective: Aerial Perspective…warm colors advance, cool colors recede
  • Actual depiction of Space with Atmospheric Perspective
  • Uses values to create “zones” of light and dark…creates a literal space of the pool hall but also the psychological space of the figures within the painting
  • Decorative use of value
  • Open Value Composition
  • Closed Value Composition
  • Value

    1. 1. Value
    2. 2. Emma McNallyC8
    3. 3. Irving Penn
    4. 4. Artemesia GentileschiJudith Decapitating Holofernesc. 1620
    5. 5. Giovanni Paolo PanniniScalinata della Trinita dei Monc. 1756 – 1758
    6. 6. Agnes MartinWood I1963
    7. 7. Michelangelo Drawing
    8. 8. Caravaggio. Supper at Emmaus. 1601.
    9. 9. Rembrandt. Self-Portrait.
    10. 10. I Wake Up Screaming. 1941.
    11. 11. Philip Govedare
    12. 12. Caspar DavidWanderer Above the Sea of Misc. 1817 – 1818
    13. 13. Sue CoePool Hall1985
    14. 14. Robert Motherwell
    15. 15. Mekhala Bahl
    16. 16. Vincent Van GoghTree with Ivy in the Asylum1889
    17. 17. Giovanni Domenico TiepoloSt. Ambrose Addressing the Young St. Augustine c. 1747 - 1750
    18. 18. Kathe KollwitzWoman with aDead Child
    19. 19. Kathe Kollwitz

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