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TIMD-IEF Part 5

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TIMD-IEF Part 5

  1. 1. Family Life Education: Which Road to Take? © 2002 International Educational Foundation IEF is responsible for the content of this presentation only if it has not been altered from the original. © IEF 1
  2. 2. Social Response — Family Life Education © IEF 2
  3. 3. Two Models of Family Life Education  Characterbased Contraceptivebased © IEF 3
  4. 4. Sexual Norm for Adolescents Character– Based Contraceptive– Based No sexual relations until marriage Sexual relations by mutual consent  Use protection © IEF 4
  5. 5. Appeal Character– Based Contraceptive– Based Character– building Expedient  Supports parents’ values  Tolerates diverse values © IEF 5
  6. 6. Educators and Guidance Character– Based Contraceptive– Based Morally directive Non–directive  Youth receptive to abstinence  Teenage sexual activity inevitable © IEF 6
  7. 7. Contraceptives Character– Based Contraceptive– Based Not promoted Promoted  Undermines abstinence  Effective protection © IEF 7
  8. 8. Meaning of Sexual Abstinence Character– Based Contraceptive– Based No genital activity Sexual relations short of intercourse © IEF 8
  9. 9. Educators’ Role Towards Parents Character– Based Contraceptive– Based Supports parental authority Support youth privacy © IEF 9
  10. 10. Contraceptive–Based Education— Dubious Effectiveness  Minimal improvements based on small samples  50% of studies show no impact Source: A. Gruenheit, Impact of HIV and Sexual Health Education, UNAIDS, 1997 © IEF 10
  11. 11. High Condom Failure Rate Against Pregnancy 13-27% failure rate for adolescent Source: Jones & Forest, Family Planning Perspectives, Jan/Feb 1992 © IEF 11
  12. 12. Risk of Pregnancy vs. Risk of Venereal Disease Pregnancy Risk  Woman only  60 days per year  Unwanted birth Disease Risk  Both woman and man  365 days a year  Death possible © IEF 12
  13. 13. Condom Ineffective in Preventing HIV 23% spouses of AIDS patients became infected  Despite consistent condom use Source: M.D.C. Guimaraes, et al., American Journal of Epidemiology, v. 142, 1995 © IEF 13
  14. 14. Do Sex Educators Themselves Trust Condoms? “I asked [800 sex educators] if they knew that a person carried the [HIV] virus, would they have sex, depending on a condom for protection? No one raised their hand.” Source: Dr. Theresa Crenshaw, past president of the American Society of Sex Educators and Therapists, and member of the Presidential AIDS Commission © IEF 14
  15. 15. Condom Promotion Gives False Sense of Security Removes youth natural reservations about premarital sex Fear of AIDS and STDs Fear of Pregnancy Worry about Parents’ Disapproval Source: Louis Harris, American Teens Speak, 1986 © IEF 15
  16. 16. Prevention Addresses Risky Behavior Cause Teenage Teenage Teenage Premarital Premarital Premarital Sex Sex Sex Teenage Teenage Pregnancy Sexual Diseases Effect © IEF 16
  17. 17. Contraceptive–Based Education Linked to Increased Sexual Activity  50% increase among 14year-olds Source: Deborah Ann Dawson, ‘Effects of Sex Education on Adolescent Behavior,” Family Planning Perspectives,Jul/Aug 1986  Greater probability among girls aged 15-17 © IEF 17
  18. 18. Character–Based Education Focuses on Reducing the Cause Teenage Teenage Teenage Premarital Premarital Premarital Sex Sex Sex Teenage Teenage Pregnancy Sexual Diseases © IEF 18
  19. 19. Public Health Benefits of Character–Based Sex Education Abstinence Education Reduction in Sexual Activity Reduction in Teenage Pregnancies & Sexual Diseases © IEF 19
  20. 20. Help Parents Protect Their Children Regulate exposure to media Discipline effectively Encourage schoolwork © IEF 20
  21. 21. Contraceptive–Based Education Lacks Guidance  Attempts to be value-neutral  Allows students to set their own standards © IEF 21
  22. 22. Abstinence Demands Knowledge and Skills Character-based education provides support needed to achieve the healthy norm © IEF 22
  23. 23. Character–Based Education Supports the Majority of Youth  Majority of American teenagers are virgins  Many non–virgins want support to postpone sexual activity © IEF 23
  24. 24. Contraceptive Instruction and Pro-Abstinence Message Do Not Mix No Premarital Sex “ Safer” Premarital Sex Abstinence Standard Lost © IEF 24
  25. 25. Balanced Condom Policy  Promote marriage as the only safe context for sex  Publicize limitations of condoms  Target high–risk adults for condom promotion © IEF 25
  26. 26. Factors Linked to Preventing Sexual Activity  Self-motivation  Academic ambition  Parental supervision  Abstinent friends  No substance abuse Source: Lawrence E. Kay, MD, “Adolescent Sexual Intercourse,” Postgraduate Medicine, June, 1995 © IEF 26

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