Final global ch care

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Final global ch care

  1. 1. CHILD CARE A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE AUSTRALIA
  2. 2. Presented By  Samriti Greedharry  Sohana Amin  Syvil Williams  Rabeya Basri  Yaldalie Chatelain-Aristilde
  3. 3. HISTORY OF AUSTRALIA
  4. 4. History 1890’s-1893’s -Great depression & poverty -unemployment -Poor housing and poor children’s nutrition -Negligence of children and lack of appropriate education August of 1895 -Meeting of kindergarten enthusiast & formed a provisional committee of Kindergarten Union -Lead by a feminist and educator Mary Banke Anderson -Goal of spreading the principles of kindergarten education and open free kindergartens wherever possible in poor area
  5. 5.  -Its teaching were based on Frobelian methods whose beliefs was that play is the highest expression of human development in childhood  January 1896 -The first free kindergarten was built -Mission Hall in Sussex St ( Factory) -Charles St in Woolloomooloo (Enrollment Increase) -Dowling St in Woolloomooloo (The kindergarten remained in 21 years)  Sydney Kindergarten Teachers College(SKTC) -Formed in 1987 -Reverend Bertram Hawker -He had a deep conviction that something could be done to help those in great need
  6. 6. World War !! -Changes in the roles of many mothers -Working outside home -Demand for childcare facilities -Demand for trained kindergarten teachers exploded -Traditional methods of fundraising proved inadequate -Dependence on government funding increased -Creative ways of catering for larger numbers of children were achieve
  7. 7.  1890’s-1893’s -Great depression and there was a great deal of poverty -Families had no income due to unemployment -The quality of housing was poor and children’s nutrition is poor -Children are neglected and no access to appropriate education  August of 1895 -Meeting of kindergarten enthusiast was held and those present formed themselves into a provisional committee of Kindergarten Union -Lead by a feminist and educator Mary Banke Anderson -Goal of spreading the principles of kindergarten education and open free kindergartens wherever possible in poor area
  8. 8. -September 26th 1905 -Kindergarten Union In South Australia -Free kindergartens established in the poorer area od Adelaide -1910 - Three kindergartens in the city and one in Bowden 1934-1945 -There were ten kindergarten with 25 fully trained teachers and 500 children
  9. 9. Present Day -During this time Kindergarten Union built a solid reputation for leading the field of early childhood provision, enriching generations of young children’s lives.
  10. 10. PHILOSOPHY
  11. 11. Underlying Philosophy Early years of learning are focused on Holistic approach of children Children are capable learner, citizens with entitlements and rights A pedagogy of care
  12. 12. Curriculum approach  Montessori  Collective pedagogy and emergent curriculum  High/scope  Waldorf pedagogy (Rudolf Steiner)  Play
  13. 13. School of Thoughts  Behaviourist approach ( Skinner)  Developmental (Piaget, Donaldson, Bowlby)  Socio-cultural (Vygotsky, Malaguzzi, Rogoff, Fleer)  Critical (Friere)  Post-structuralist (Foucault, MacNaughton, Canella, Grieshaber)
  14. 14. TYPES OF CHILDCARE IN AUSTRALIA
  15. 15. LONG DAY CARE  Long day care also known as Kindergarten, Preschool, Childcare centres or early learning centres.  This childcare opens at 7:00am to 6:00pm and offers professional care for children from birth to six years.  This childcare centres usually available for all day, morning or afternoon sessions.  These centres also provide meal to the children.  Private companies, local councils, community organizations, or non-profit organizations run long day centres.
  16. 16. FAMILY DAY CARE  Family day care also known as home based care.  These cares are where professional carer looks after the child in carer’s home.  Carer mainly looks after the children from birth to six years.  The state and territory government law determines the number of children each carer can have in their home.
  17. 17. IN HOME CARE  In home care is similar to family day care except the carer looks after the child in child’s home.  Home care services are for families with children who cannot be cared for many reasons. Like; Child has illness or special needs.
  18. 18. OUTSIDE SCHOOL HOURS  Outside school hours care also called out of school hours.  These care centres provide care for school aged children, before and after between 7:00am – 9:00am and 3:00 – 6:00pm also during children’s holidays.  Many centres offer a small snack to the children’s.
  19. 19. OCCASIONAL CARE  Occasional care offers professional care for children on casual basis.  This service is for those families who do not need childcare on a regular basis.  Sometimes parents need someone to look after their children occasionally.
  20. 20. IMPORTANCT INFORMATION  All mentioned childcare should be approved by the government law and must show that they are meeting quality standards.  The National Quality Framework for childhood education and care ensures children receive a high standard of education and care.  The Framework is a national approach to the regulation and quality assessment of early childhood education and care services.
  21. 21. ROLE OF EARLY YEARS EDUCATOR
  22. 22. Roles and Responsibility  Certificate 3 in children service  First aid qualification including anaphylaxis, asthma, and CPR certificates  A regional Australian department for communities and social inclusion criminal history check
  23. 23. Certificate 3 in children services 548 hours of training approved by ACECQA CPR and First aid certificate
  24. 24. ACCESSIBILITY AND AVAILABILITY
  25. 25. Accessibility       Childcare subsidies. A big demand for child care in the past few decades. In 1984, Introduction of child care subsidies. In 1993, Expenditure of child care Assistance (Cash Rebate). $500 million was invested by The Department of Human Services and Health. In 1994, a number of 230000 families and 345000 children were increased.
  26. 26. Availability  The Department of Human Services and Health increased the number of funding to enhance child care.  In 1993 the number of child care were increased from 46000 to 208000.  Non eligible families had difficulty to find care for sick children.  Non eligible parents faced other difficulties such as finding right location, finding a place at the child care center of choice, and good quality care.
  27. 27. Animoto Will Come here  http://animoto.com/play/6HtxvSnuSx1 BrqSpap11JA
  28. 28. REFERENCE LIST  http://www.pc.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/61841/chapter14.pdf  http://www.sa.gov.au/subject/Education%2C+skills+and+learning/Early+ch ildhood%2C+education+and+care/Types+of+early+childhood+services  http://flic.kr/p/251Vy9  http://flic.kr/p/8JFdVJ  http://flic.kr/p/ctfnFd  http://www.morguefile.com  http://flic.kr/p/8Fb3tw  http://mrg.bz/YWEg8o  http://mrg.bz/ZDMfXv
  29. 29. Picture of accessibility and availability  Picture of roles of ECE http://flic.kr/p/8JFdVJ   Picture of philosophy
  30. 30. THANK YOU

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