Open Road Social media

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Introduction into social media for public policy PR agency - Open Road - by RAAK

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Open Road Social media

  1. 1. Social media a quick overview
  2. 2. The Trafigura incident “The Guardian has been prevented from reporting parliamentary proceedings on legal grounds which appear to call into question privileges guaranteeing free speech established under the 1688 Bill of Rights. Today’s published Commons order papers contain a question to be answered by a minister later this week. The Guardian is prevented from identifying the MP who has asked the question, what the question is, which minister might answer it, or where the question is to be found.” (The Streisand effect)
  3. 3. Print circulation is down 30% from 1956 to 2006
  4. 4. TV viewing also under pressure
  5. 5. New channels
  6. 6. New channels
  7. 7. Advertising is moving from off to online
  8. 8. AND there’s even trouble online in brand advertising Online revenue UK Q1 & Q2 percentages Brand advertising is relatively small online, and there is no indication 22% yet that it will manage to close the gap with online Paid for search direct response. Internet display (Brand) Unlike offline, paid for 58% Classifieds search and classifieds 20% (both form of direct response) dominates online.
  9. 9. Social Media is on the march “But by using interactive Web 2.0 tools, Mr. Obama’s campaign changed the way politicians organize supporters, advertise to voters, defend against attacks and communicate with constituents.”
  10. 10. Definition of Social Media
  11. 11. Definition of Social Media Is it HYPE ?
  12. 12. Definition of Social Media Is it HYPE ? Is it technology ?
  13. 13. It’s not HYPE “Facebook more popular than porn” Oct 2007
  14. 14. Is it new TECHNOLOGY? “We greet the inhabitants of Budapest. We greet them in an unusual way from which telephone broadcasting all over the world will start its victorious journey.” - first broadcast from Tivadar Puskás of Telefon Hírmondó
  15. 15. Is it new TECHNOLOGY? “We greet the inhabitants of Budapest. We greet them in an unusual way from which telephone broadcasting all over the world will start its victorious journey.” - first broadcast from Tivadar Puskás of Telefon Hírmondó ‣ One-way & two-way media have always co-existed
  16. 16. Is it new TECHNOLOGY? “We greet the inhabitants of Budapest. We greet them in an unusual way from which telephone broadcasting all over the world will start its victorious journey.” - first broadcast from Tivadar Puskás of Telefon Hírmondó ‣ One-way & two-way media have always co-existed ‣ What about the so-called killer apps of Web 1.0?
  17. 17. Jerry Yang’s guide to the World Wide Web
  18. 18. The exponential growth of the WWW Google launches (9 million sites) April 1996 Page & Brin starts working on the Google search engine (100,000 websites) Jerry’s guide - April 1994 (1000 websites) Source: Jacob Nielsen - useit.com
  19. 19. What was different? ‣ Traditional scarcity => Spectacular growth of media ‘outlets’
  20. 20. What was different? ‣ Traditional scarcity => Spectacular growth of media ‘outlets’ ‣ Professionalism => Amateur
  21. 21. How is search social? The Magna Carta of the web PR(U) = (1-d) + d * sumV(PR(V)/N(V))
  22. 22. How is search social? ‘PageRank relies on the uniquely democratic nature of the web by using its vast link structure as an indicator of an individual page’s value. In essence, Google interprets a link from page A to page B as a vote, by page A, for page B. But, Google looks at more than the sheer volume of votes, or links a page receives; it also analyzes the page that casts the vote. Votes cast by pages that are themselves “important” weigh more heavily and help to make other pages “Important”.’ Google
  23. 23. Social Media is participation “Andy Warhol said everybody is famous for 15 minutes. Social Networking changed that to everyone is famous for 15 people. If you have a million friends, you’re broadcasting. You’re an entertainer” Tom Anderson founder of MySpace
  24. 24. Social Media is participation No longer a one-way hierarchy...
  25. 25. Social Media is participation ...but an interactive process.
  26. 26. Social Media is participation Ordinary human needs have found a home in social media. ‣ Altruism ‣ Socialising ‣ Self-actualisation ‣ Networking
  27. 27. Implications Jeff Jarvis talks of things organisations should consider ‣ New relationships - Give the people control: we will use it - Your customer is your partner or advertiser - Your product is your advertising (The rise of content)
  28. 28. Implications ‣ New architecture - Do what you do best and link to the rest - Join a network or be a platform - Think distributed
  29. 29. Implications ‣ New publicness - If you’re not searchable, you won’t be found - Everybody needs a little SEO - Journalism & objectivity? (Washington
  30. 30. Implications ‣ New society - “Elegant organization”, Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook
  31. 31. Implications ‣ New economy - Manage abundance, not scarcity (In media) - Join the open-source, gift economy - The mass market is dead - long live the mass of niches
  32. 32. Implications ‣ New attitude - “There is an inverse relationship between control and trust”, David Weinberger - The art of listening
  33. 33. Implications ‣ New ethic - Make mistakes well - Be honest & authentic - Be transparent - Collaborate
  34. 34. Implications ‣ Content UK Media Guardian editorial September 2008 “Is nothing sacred? Even the term "advertising" might soon be defunct. Agencies operating in the digital world prefer the word "content", suggesting all sorts of lovely free entertainment and added value rather than shameless selling. The old, interruptive model of advertising is changing in favour of a highly-targeted approach where consumers almost welcome the messages rather than get beaten into submission.”
  35. 35. How organisations can use Social Media
  36. 36. How organisations can use Social Media ‣ Listening To learn more about what people think of your organization
  37. 37. How organisations can use Social Media ‣ Listening To learn more about what people think of your organization ‣ Talking To partake in the conversation
  38. 38. How organisations can use Social Media ‣ Listening To learn more about what people think of your organization ‣ Talking To partake in the conversation ‣ Embracing Integrate your members in the way your business works
  39. 39. How organisations can use Social Media ‣ Listening To learn more about what people think of your organization ‣ Talking To partake in the conversation ‣ Embracing Integrate your members in the way your business works ‣ Energizing Let members evangelize to others about you
  40. 40. How organisations can use Social Media ‣ Listening To learn more about what people think of your organization ‣ Talking To partake in the conversation ‣ Embracing Integrate your members in the way your business works ‣ Energizing Let members evangelize to others about you ‣ Helping Let customers help each other
  41. 41. How organisations can use Social Media Your demographic Creators Publish a blog Publish your own Web pages Upload video you created profile Post ratings/reviews of products/services Critics Comment on someone else’s blog Use RSS feeds Collectors Add “tags” to Web pages or photos Joiners Maintain profile on a social networking Read blogs Spectators Watch video from other users Listen to podcasts Inactives None of the above Social Technographics ™ Ladder by Forrester
  42. 42. How organisations can use Social Media Your communications problem Blogs Social Network Viral video Micro blogging Communities Complexity Best Awareness Also good Best Also good Word of Mouth Also good Best Also good Accessibility Best
  43. 43. How organisations can use Social Media Blogs Companies with a complexity problem stand to benefit from using blogs.
  44. 44. How organisations can use Social Media Video “Viral videos are best for punching through the noise – the awareness problem.” - Li and Bernoff (Forrester)
  45. 45. How organisations can use Social Media Social Networks “If you want to be hot and have people talking about how hot you are then Facebook and MySpace are for you.” - Li and Bernoff (Forrester)
  46. 46. How organisations can use Social Media Communities ‣ An option for those who have difficulty get their messages to their customers ‣ Need strong identities
  47. 47. How organisations can use Social Media Micro Blogging & Status updates ‣ Good for listening ‣ Networking and building relationships ‣ Announcing things & self promotion ‣ Customer relations
  48. 48. How organisations can use Social Media Multi-platform
  49. 49. Case study: canEUhearme ‣ MTV was tasked by the European Union (EU) to increase awareness about the upcoming EU elections amongst young people. And energise them to take part. ‣ EU wanted to build a bespoke social network where young people could interact around a common European- ness.
  50. 50. Case study: canEUhearme
  51. 51. Case study: canEUhearme ‣ Facebook Connect on Shout Box
  52. 52. Case study: canEUhearme ‣ Shout archive
  53. 53. Case study: canEUhearme ‣ Facebook Connect on Polls
  54. 54. Case study: canEUhearme ‣ Twitter Integration
  55. 55. Case study: canEUhearme ‣ Twitter Integration
  56. 56. Case study: canEUhearme ‣ Picture Competition
  57. 57. Case study: canEUhearme ‣ Comments
  58. 58. How organisations can use Social Media ‣ Listening To learn more about what people think of your organization ‣ Talking To partake in the conversation ‣ Embracing Integrate your members in the way your business works. ‣ Energizing Let members evangelize to others about you ‣ Helping Let customers help each other

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