Hypertext,literature and reading

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Hypertext,literature and reading

  1. 1. Hypertext, Hypertext literature And Reading
  2. 2. The end of Gutenburg? www.biffonline.co.uk/hypertext.html
  3. 3. History of hypertext • 1945, concept proposed by Vannevar Bush • 1965, term was coined by Ted Nelson (quot;non-sequential writing) • 1967, the first experimental systems - The Hypertext Editing System and Press (1968) was built by Van Dam in Brown University • 1968, NLS system was displayed by Doug Engelbart at FJCC • PC, Internet, 1st examination of their uses and implications • WWW refinement of existing technologies digital immigrants to digital natives
  4. 4. Hypertext - Nodes - Link - Network quot;we must abandon conceptual systems founded upon ideas of center, margin, hierarchy, and linearity and replace them with ones of multilinearity, nodes, links, and networksquot; (Landow)
  5. 5. Traditional text (linear) Hypertext (non-linear) www.cs.sfu.ca/.../notes/Chap1/Chap1.html
  6. 6. Hypertext literature Victory Garden (Stuart Moulthrop, 1991) - Multiple entries - No protagonist - No set ‘end’ http://www.eastgate.com/catalog/VictoryGarden.html http://www.informationfarming.com/VG/VGStart.html
  7. 7. Challenge & Revolution Traditional literature Hypertext literature • Linear • Non-linear (arborescent) “the plot must be followed in a specific direction, from birth to death, beginning to end.” • Writer and reader • writer+reader=wreader(Marti n E. Rosenberg) • Interactive • Spatial and temporal abruption • Sense of freedom • Decentering
  8. 8. Drawbacks • Confusion • Out of control (collaborative creation) • Print culture quot;[p]rint culture affordsirreplaceable forms of focused attention and contemplation that make complex communications and insights possible.” “in which the quiet voice of literature cannot easily be heard”
  9. 9. “Solvitur ambulando. We'll know where we're going when we get there.” Stuart Moulthrop
  10. 10. References George P. Landow, Hypertext: The Convergence of Contemporary Critical Theory and Technology, 1992. Marie-Laure Ryan, Multivariant Narratives, A Companion to Digital Humanities, pp. 415- 430, 2004 Martin E. Rosenberg, Physics and Hypertext: Liberation and Complicity in Art and Pedagogy, 1994. Nelson, Ted, Computer Lib / Dream Machines: New Freedoms Through Computer Screens—a Minority Report. Chicago: Hugo's Book Service, 1974. Robert Coover, Literary Hypertext: The Passing of the Golden Age, 1999.
  11. 11. THANK YOU

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