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Why India?<br />
The Daily Telegraph, Where Our Jobs Went, 10th October, 2006<br />
SBS News Service, 31/10/06<br />PM: Kyoto won’t work				<br />“Australia pointed an accusing finger at China and India as ...
Sydney Morning Herald, March 15, 2007<br />Why India May Save Sydney<br />India has been growing at about 9 per cent a yea...
New Economic World Order<br /><ul><li>China and India to rise by 2020
Resources: in 2005, China and India together consumed:
35% of world steel
24% of aluminium
51% of coal
55% of cement
40% of iron ore
51% of cotton
12 of oil
These are all set to rise... Still
Both are nuclear powers</li></li></ul><li>Indian Anger Boils OverThe Age, June 1, 2009<br />
The Times of India,September 17, 2009<br />Don't break the law, Australian PM warns Indian students<br />The Times of Indi...
The idea of ‘India’ in Australia<br />Call centres<br />Cricket scandals<br />Nuclear tests and deals<br />Poverty<br />Sp...
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Why india

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Why india

  1. 1. Why India?<br />
  2. 2. The Daily Telegraph, Where Our Jobs Went, 10th October, 2006<br />
  3. 3. SBS News Service, 31/10/06<br />PM: Kyoto won’t work <br />“Australia pointed an accusing finger at China and India as major polluters as it refused to ratify the Kyoto Protocol on climate change despite a major new report warning of impending catastrophe.”<br />“Kyoto does not impose the obligations it would have imposed on Australia on countries like China and India”, Mr Howard said.<br />
  4. 4. Sydney Morning Herald, March 15, 2007<br />Why India May Save Sydney<br />India has been growing at about 9 per cent a year and will become the world's third biggest economy by 2050.<br />India’s rapid expansion is being driven by services rather than manufacturing. That means India is likely to demand the services that Sydney is good at providing, including financial services, telecommunications, information technology, education and media.<br />Sydney's expertise in infrastructure development, construction management and consulting services are also likely to be in demand as India builds roads, bridges and power stations.<br />
  5. 5. New Economic World Order<br /><ul><li>China and India to rise by 2020
  6. 6. Resources: in 2005, China and India together consumed:
  7. 7. 35% of world steel
  8. 8. 24% of aluminium
  9. 9. 51% of coal
  10. 10. 55% of cement
  11. 11. 40% of iron ore
  12. 12. 51% of cotton
  13. 13. 12 of oil
  14. 14. These are all set to rise... Still
  15. 15. Both are nuclear powers</li></li></ul><li>Indian Anger Boils OverThe Age, June 1, 2009<br />
  16. 16. The Times of India,September 17, 2009<br />Don't break the law, Australian PM warns Indian students<br />The Times of India is the biggest selling English language newspaper in the world<br />The laws are there for a purpose and that is for all citizens to adhere to them<br />SOURCE: HINDUSTAN TIMES 4 WEEKS AGO<br />There really has to be some form of retaliation from the Indian community as a whole. India has to stand up<br />SOURCE: HINDUSTAN TIMES 4 WEEKS AGO<br />I don't think there is any doubt at all that some of the events over the last few months have damaged our brand and the Australian brand in India<br />John Brumby, Premier of Victoria<br />SOURCE: HINDUSTAN TIMES 2 WEEKS AGO<br />
  17. 17. The idea of ‘India’ in Australia<br />Call centres<br />Cricket scandals<br />Nuclear tests and deals<br />Poverty<br />Spirituality, religiosity and yoga<br />‘Kitsch’ Bollywood film<br />We need a historically – informed explanation for any of the above<br />
  18. 18. India’s Region<br /><ul><li>A region which demands understanding:
  19. 19. Pakistan
  20. 20. Afghanistan
  21. 21. Nepal
  22. 22. China
  23. 23. Bangladesh
  24. 24. Sri Lanka
  25. 25. Burma</li></li></ul><li>India’s Demography<br />Young (50% of the Indian population is under 25)<br />By 2025, India’s under 25 population will still be massive, whereas China’s will be ‘greying’<br />Rapidly expanding middle class<br />Families beginning to ‘nuclearise’ in urban areas<br />
  26. 26. Poverty in India<br />Exists alongside extraordinary wealth<br />India is home to 1/3 of the worlds poor<br />Need to understand historical forces that create poverty (colonialism, dependency theory, caste)<br />Rural poverty:<br />1947: 50%<br />1987: 29%<br />2000: 25%<br />
  27. 27. Why focus on India?<br />Familiarity with certain common ‘structures’<br />As former British colonies, there are many similarities between Australia and India:<br />India is English Speaking<br />India aspires to modernity along quasi-western lines<br />
  28. 28. AND... India is democraticA sign on the Indo-Pakistan border<br />
  29. 29. But there are differences...<br />Enormous diversity<br />The caste system<br />Religion:<br />A secular society, with a Hindu majority, yet is the 2nd largest Muslim country in the world<br />
  30. 30. An age of heritage...<br />The Legacy of the British Empire<br />Indian civilisation:<br />Incredible architecture<br />Sophisticated art<br />Dress<br />Social norms<br />
  31. 31. Where to begin...<br />Colonialism<br />The period of the British Raj<br />
  32. 32. Where to from here...<br />Globalisation<br />Indianisation<br />India has approached globalisation differently<br />Maintained elements of a closed economy<br />Cushioned India from extremes of globalisation in 1991 and 2009 meltdowns<br />Conscious of process of engagement with Western Culture<br />Reactions against globalisation:<br />Nuclear tests (explicit defiance of the West)<br />Name Changes (Kolkata...)<br />Resistance to Western Culture (Anti-Valentine’s Day protests)<br />Maintenance of distinctly Indian Cultural outlets (Bollywood)<br />

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