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Liposomal vitamin c - Uses side effects contraindications

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Liposomal vitamin c: Also referred to as L-ascorbic acid, soluble in water (hydrosoluble) and powerful antioxidant. It is essential for tissue repair and growth and collagen synthesis in blood vessels, bones and cartilages.

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Liposomal vitamin c - Uses side effects contraindications

  1. 1. Quicksilver Scientific 18 Liposomal vitamin c Uses side effects contraindications Quicksilver Scientific
  2. 2. Liposomal vitamin c Also referred to as L-ascorbic acid, soluble in water (hydro soluble) and powerful antioxidant. It is essential for tissue repair and growth and collagen synthesis in blood vessels, bones and cartilages. Liposomal vitamin c Supplement is also known as:  Ascorbic acid  Vitamin Antiescorbútica  Acerbate  Calcium acerbate  Sodium acerbate  Ascorbic palpitate  Magnesium acerbate  L-Ascorbic acid  Acrobats Minerals Uses and benefits of liposomal vitamin c Historically, vitamin C is used to prevent and treat scurvy; A disease that was most commonly presented in sailors due to the absence of fruits and vegetables in their diet during their long journeys. However, nowadays scurvy is a relatively rare condition liposomal vitamin c is an essential nutrient that must be obtained by humans from external sources In its natural form, it is mainly found in fruits and vegetables and as a supplement, its consumption is very popular The lack of effect of prophylactic supplement with liposomal vitamin c on the incidence of the common cold in normal populations casts doubt on the usefulness of this widespread practice. What is the difference between natural vitamin C and liposomal vitamin c supplement? The basic element of this vitamin which is ascorbic acid L is the same as that found naturally in food. There are few studies on the actual bioavailability of vitamin C in the form of supplement vs. natural Vitamin C. Clinically significant differences are not present in these studies. However, the bioavailability of the supplement appears to be related to the presentation of ascorbic acid. To appear, the bioavailability of synthetic ascorbic acid powder and administered in water (effervescent tablets and powders) is superior to the bioavailability of long-release ascorbic acid preparations (capsules).
  3. 3. How it works Liposomal vitamin c participates in enzymatic reactions that complement the catalysis in different metabolic processes. It is necessary for the correct development and operation of many parts of the body. It intervenes in the synthesis of collagen, a major protein in the formation and regeneration of the skin, cartilage, tendons, ligaments, bones, teeth and blood vessels. Intervenes in the absorption of iron. As an antioxidant and in conjunction with other nutrients, it blocks some of the damage caused by free radicals, substances that damage the DNA. The accumulation of free radicals can contribute to the aging process and the development of health conditions such as cancer, heart disease and arthritis. Vitamin C supplement is generally used for its benefits in the treatment of: Important note The following uses are based on scientific theories and traditional remedies. However, some of these uses have not been tested in humans, so their safety and efficacy are not always fully demonstrated. It is therefore of paramount importance to consider that some of these conditions are serious or potentially serious and should be assessed by a qualified physician.
  4. 4. Prevention and treatment of the common cold:  Gum Infections  Acne infections  Skin infections  Bronchitis  Acquired immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS  Stomach ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori  Bladder and prostate infections  Tuberculosis  Dysentery  Boils (furunculosis)  Depression  Dementia  Alzheimer's disease  Physical and mental stress  Fatigue  Attention Deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)  Arteriosclerosis  Stroke  High blood pressure  High cholesterol  Glaucoma  Lyme disease In preventing:  Falls  Gallbladder disorders  Caries  Constipation  Immune system stimulation  Heat stroke  Hay fever  Asthma  Bronchitis  Cystic fibrosis  Infertility  Diabetes  Chronic fatigue syndrome  Autism
  5. 5.  Collagen disorders  Arthritis  Bursitis  Back pain  Cancer  Osteoporosis Benefits attributed to liposomal vitamin c include  Increased iron absorption of food and correction in the imbalance of certain proteins in newborn infants (tyrosinemia).  Increased and improved physical resistance  Slowing aging  Protection of the skin, especially of the sun, radiotherapy and pollutants of the environment.  Improving vision in people with ileitis  Relieve dry mouth, particularly due to antidepressant medications (a common side effect of these drugs).  Healing of wounds and burns  Decreased blood sugar in people with diabetes  Some viral conditions, including mononucleosis.  Some physicians may suggest high doses of vitamin C for the treatment of some viruses.
  6. 6. Efficiency Effective There is solid scientific evidence that proves its efficacy in the following uses Scurvy Scurvy is caused by a lack of liposomal vitamin c in the diet. Although it is a disease that currently appears rarely, it may appear in malnourished people, or need more vitamin C (pregnant or lactating women). In the case of babies, orange juice may be used in case of non-access to the supplement. Treatment usually lasts for 7 days, and symptoms should begin to fade in the first 2 days. This treatment should be carried out under strict medical supervision. Probably effective There is good scientific evidence and clinical trials, however, additional studies are required to have a solid scientific basis for their efficacy in the following uses: Prevention of common cold in extreme environments Studies show that liposomal vitamin c supplementation reduces the risk of developing colds in people undergoing extreme physical exertion and environmental conditions. Although more research is required, it may be of particular interest to high-level athletes or military personnel.
  7. 7. Improving iron absorption Scientific research seems to show that liposomal vitamin c can improve absorption of iron supplements by mouth. However, more research is needed to make these results conclusive. Urinary tract Infection Liposomal vitamin c seems to reduce the risk of developing urinary tract infections during pregnancy and in elderly people. More research is needed to confirm this finding. Tyrosinemia Tyrosinemia is a genetic disorder in newborns related to metabolism. liposomal vitamin c intake by mouth or intravenously improves this genetic disorder in newborn infants when tyrosine blood levels are too high. Possibly effective There is little scientific evidence and in some cases the results are contradictory or inconclusive to evaluate the efficacy of liposomal vitamin c in the following uses: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) Available evidence suggests that daily intake of liposomal vitamin c in combination with zinc, vitamin E, and beta-carotene seems to help prevent loss of vision or retard worsening of age-related macular degeneration when it is in advanced state. However, there is insufficient evidence to know whether this combination helps people with less advanced macular degeneration or prevents or impedes the disease. There is also a need for scientific evidence showing the beneficial effects of this disease when only liposomal vitamin c is consumed. In addition, the use of liposomal vitamin c with other antioxidants, but in the absence of zinc, does not seem to have an effect on the symptoms of age-related macular degeneration. Decreased protein in the urine (albuminuria) The use of vitamin C and E can reduce protein in urine in people with diabetes. Hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis) Oral vitamin C consumption seems to reduce the risk of arterial hardening. It also seems to slow down the speed at which atherosclerosis is worsening. More research is needed to understand the effects of liposomal vitamin c and other supplements in the diet, once atherosclerosis has developed.
  8. 8. Cancer Some research suggests that increased intake of vitamin C by ingesting fruits and vegetables could reduce the risk of developing mouth cancer and other types of cancer. However, the consumption of vitamin C supplements does not seem to reduce the risk of cancer. Common cold (under normal conditions) There is some controversy about the effectiveness of liposomal vitamin c in the treatment of the common cold. However, some tests suggest that high doses of vitamin C may shorten the cold time in some patients in a period of 1 to 15 days. Chronic pain (Complex regional pain syndrome) Vitamin C seems to decrease the risk of developing a condition called complex regional pain syndrome when consumed after a wrist fracture. Kidney problems related to contrast media used during angiography. Taking vitamin C before and after an angiography seems to reduce the risk of developing kidney problems. Redness (erythematic) after cosmetic skin procedures. There is evidence about the topical application of vitamin C, in relation to the decrease in the intensity and duration of redness of the skin after a laser treatment for the removal of wrinkles and scars.
  9. 9. Pulmonary infections caused by intense exercise. Vitamin C intake prior to an intense physical exercise involving the cardiopulmonary system may prevent upper respiratory tract infections that eventually occur after intense exercise. Gallbladder disease There is evidence that vitamin C could help prevent gallbladder disease in women...However, it does not seem to have the same effect on men. Stomach ulcers Some research suggests that this vitamin seems to decrease some side effects caused by the treatment of bacterial infections in the stomach caused. Once the bacterium is exterminated, vitamin C appears to decrease the development of pre-cancerous lesions in the stomach...However; other research suggests that liposomal vitamin c does not improve the cure for H. pylori infection. Hemolytic Anemia. It is believed that this vitamin may improve hemolytic anemia but studies are needed to support this hypothesis. Hypertension. Vitamin C in combination with conventional medications to reduce blood pressure seems to have a small effect on lowering systolic blood pressure (the highest number of blood pressure readings), but it does not seem to decrease the pressure Diastolic (lowest number)..Consumption of vitamin without the accompaniment of conventional drugs does not seem to affect blood pressure. Lead poisoning The consumption of vitamin C through the diet seems to reduce blood levels of lead. Osteoarthritis There is some evidence that vitamin C consumption through dietary sources or by supplementation of calcium acerbate prevents loss of cartilage and worsening of symptoms in people with osteoarthritis. Improvement of physical performance As part of the diet, it can improve physical performance and muscle strength in older people...In addition; there is some evidence that the liposomal vitamin c supplement may improve oxygen consumption in adolescents during exercise.
  10. 10. Tanning and sunburn prevention Vitamin C intake in combination with vitamin E seems to prevent sunburn. However, sunburn is not prevented by the consumption of liposomal vitamin c on its own. Wrinkles on the skin Skin creams containing vitamin C in combination with acetyl tyrosine, zinc sulfate, sodium hyaluronate, and bioflavonoid, appear to improve the appearance of the facial skin, when it has wrinkles caused by premature aging due to a Frequent exposure to the sun. Skin pigmentation disorders There is limited scientific evidence suggesting that liposomal vitamin c may have an effect on per follicular pigmentation (increased skin color near the capillary follicle). However, further studies are required for these preliminary results to be conclusive. Stroke prevention There is evidence that may decrease the risk of stroke. More research is required in this area. Tetanus Tetanus is a serious infection that can be prevented by vaccination. liposomal vitamin c can prevent death from tetanus infection. More research is required. Type 2 Diabetes The effects of vitamin C on people with diabetes are mixed. Virginities Early research suggests that vitamin C applied in the vagina may help decrease the symptoms of virginities. More research is required to confirm this finding. Falls Cataracts are a disease in which the vision becomes cloudy. Research for the use of vitamin C in this condition is contradictory and produced mixed results. Vitamin C, E and beta-carotene do not seem to have any significant effect on age-related loss of vision due to cataracts in well-nourished people taking the long-term supplement (for an average of 6.3 years).On the other hand, other research suggests that taking multivitamins containing vitamin C for 10 years seems to prevent cataracts. The use of supplements for shorter periods does not seem to work. Prevention of heart disease Foods with high vitamin C content have been associated with a lower risk of heart disease. However, research has shown that vitamin C supplementation has no effect on the prevention of these diseases.
  11. 11. Hay fever (Allergic rhinitis) The scientific evidence is contradictory in relation to the effects of this vitamin in the improvement of the symptoms of hay fever. Gastric damage caused by aspirin Some research suggests that it could prevent stomach damage caused by aspirin. Asthma There is some evidence on the relationship of low levels of vitamin C with asthma. However, other research suggests that liposomal vitamin c consumption does not reduce the risk of developing asthma or improving symptoms. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder The evidence is contradictory. Some suggest that high-dose vitamin C consumption does not reduce ADHD symptoms. However, other studies suggest that the lower consumption of this vitamin could improve symptoms such as restlessness and self-control in children with attention deficit due to hyperactivity. Autism Preliminary evidence suggests that vitamin C intake reduces the severity of autism symptoms in children. Breast cancer Some research suggests that high dietary consumption reduces risk of breast cancer, while others suggest that they have no effect. There is also no evidence about the consumption of liposomal vitamin c supplements related to reducing the risk of developing breast cancer. Burns Preliminary evidence indicates that the use of vitamin C in the first 24 hours of a severe burn reduces wound swelling. Cervical cancer Some research suggests that taking vitamin C reduces the risk of cervical cancer. Poor blood circulation in the legs (chronic venous insufficiency) Research suggests that taking a specific product (Cycle 3 Fort) containing, Hesperidins methyl chaconne, and vitamin C reduces pain, cramps and other symptoms in people with poor blood circulation in the legs.
  12. 12. Dental plaque Chewing gum with vitamin C content seems to reduce dental plaque. Diabetes The evidence is contradictory. Some research suggests that taking liposomal vitamin c decreases blood sugar and cholesterol levels in people with diabetes. However, other research suggests that it does not improve blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Vitamin C does not seem to reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Endometrial cancer Research suggests that vitamin C intake in the diet slightly reduces the risk of endometrial cancer. Esophageal cancer Vitamin C supplement consumption along with beta-carotene and vitamin E does not reduce the risk of developing esophageal cancer. However, increased vitamin C intake in the diet appears to be related to a lower risk of esophageal cancer.
  13. 13. Stomach cancer Research into liposomal vitamin c intake either through supplements or diet, does not coincide in that it can prevent stomach cancer. Intake of vitamin supplements in combination with beta-carotene or beta- carotene and vitamin E does not appear to reduce the risk of stomach cancer. However, some evidence suggests that vitamin C injection alone could prevent the progress of pre-cancerous ulcers at high risk of developing stomach cancer. Drop. Research shows that increased intake of liposomal vitamin c in the diet is related to a lower risk of gout in men. HIV/AIDS Daily intake of vitamin C along with vitamin A, beta-carotene, vitamin E, selenium, and Coenzyme Q 10 appears to have beneficial effects in people with AIDS. However, there is no evidence of any change in viral load at low or high doses of liposomal vitamin c. Transmission of HIV Vitamin C intake in combination with vitamin B and vitamin E during pregnancy and lactation seems to reduce the risk of HIV/AIDS transmission to the baby High cholesterol Daily intake of vitamin C in people with normal cholesterol levels does not seem to be related. However, some research suggests that its consumption reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL or "bad cholesterol") in people with high cholesterol levels. Sterility Preliminary evidence suggests that women with certain fertility problems could benefit from daily vitamin C intake. Leukemia The evidence suggests that vitamin C may improve the effects of Trisenox (arsenic trioxide) in people with leukemia. Mental stress There is limited evidence suggesting that vitamin C may reduce blood pressure and some symptoms during episodes of mental distress. Liver disease (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis) Preliminary research suggests that vitamin C intake in combination with vitamin E could improve some aspects of liver function in people with steatohepatitis. However this combination does not seem to decrease the inflammation of the liver in people with this condition.
  14. 14. Osteoporosis There is some evidence suggesting that vitamin C could strengthen the bone system. However, increased levels of vitamin C in blood in postmenopausal women have been associated with lower bone mineral density. More research is needed on the effects of vitamin C on bone mineral density. Pneumonia There is evidence that may suggest that vitamin C may reduce the risk of pneumonia. It could also reduce the duration of the disease once it develops. Pressure ulcers (deceits ulcers) The evidence is contradictory. Some studies suggest that liposomal vitamin c consumption does not improve wound healing in people with pressure ulcers. However, in other researches it has been found that its consumption reduces its size. Sickle cell Anemia Consuming liposomal vitamin c in combination with aged garlic extract and vitamin E could benefit people with sickle cell disease. Lung cancer Some research suggests that vitamin C consumption does not reduce the risk of lung cancer, or death from this cause. Possibly ineffective There is some inconclusive scientific evidence to demonstrate the inefficacy of this supplement in the following uses: Alzheimer's disease and dementia. When vitamin C is consumed as part of the diet, or as a supplement in combination with vitamin E, it does not seem to reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease or dementia. However, some research suggests that long-term use of liposomal vitamin c supplementation and vitamin E is associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's disease. Ocular disease associated with interferon By mouth, it does not appear to reduce the risk of ocular disease associated with treatment with a drug called interferon in patients with liver disease. Death for any cause Some research has associated high levels of vitamin C in the blood with a lower risk of death for any cause. However, other studies have found that daily taking this vitamin in combination with vitamin E, beta-carotene, selenium and zinc does not reduce the risk of death for any cause. In general, most studies suggest that liposomal vitamin c supplementation does not reduce the risk of death.
  15. 15. Pancreatic cancer Studies show that vitamin C intake in combination with beta-carotene and vitamin E does not reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Hypertension during pregnancy (pre-eclampsia) Some research suggests that vitamin C intake by mouth along with vitamin E seems to prevent high blood pressure during high-risk pregnancy. But most studies show that this combination does not reduce the risk of high blood pressure during pregnancy. Complications during pregnancy Studies suggest that consumption of vitamin C alone or in combination with vitamin E does not reduce the risk of complications during pregnancy. Prostate cancer Research shows that the combination of vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, selenium and zinc does not reduce the risk of prostate cancer. In general, most studies suggest that taking vitamin C supplements does not reduce the risk of developing prostate cancer. Stroke prevention Most research suggests that the intake of liposomal vitamin c supplementation by mouth does not reduce the risk of stroke. Bladder cancer Taking vitamin C does not seem to affect the survival of bladder cancer.
  16. 16. Prevention of allergic rhinitis or hay fever Taking vitamin C does not seem to prevent hay fever. Ovarian cancer Vitamin C intake in the diet does not seem to have an effect on the risk of developing ovarian cancer. Parkinson's disease Research suggests that increased intake of vitamin C in the diet does not reduce the risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Ineffective There is solid scientific evidence that demonstrates the inefficacy of vitamin C in the following uses: Prevention of the common cold Vitamin C intake is not effective for preventing the common cold. Unknown efficacy or insufficient evidence Research studies are very small or non-existent in the following cases:  Cystic fibrosis.  Lyme disease.  Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)  Tuberculosis.  Acne. Side effects The consumption of liposomal vitamin c is safe in most people when it is acquired from food or supplements in the recommended safe quantities and by the following routes of administration:  Topical application  Intramuscular Route  Intravenous route It may cause some people the following unwanted effects:  Nausea  Vomiting  Heartburn  stomach pain  Headache
  17. 17.  Cramps  Chest Pain  Dental erosion  Fainting  Fatigue  Red blood cell complications  tingling or skin irritation  Thickening of blood vessels near the heart  Urinary complications The risk of suffering side effects is directly proportional to the amount of vitamin consumed. Some studies consider that the amounts higher than 1000 mg per day are not safe and may cause many potentially serious side effects such as:  Blood clotting  Kidney stones  Pro-oxidant effects  Problems with the digestive system  Destruction of red blood cells.  Death (related to heart failure) In people who have had kidney stones, the amounts higher than 1000 mg per day can significantly increase the risk of their recurrence. Contraindications and Special Precautions Special precautions during use Pregnancy and breastfeeding Vitamin intake is likely safe in pregnant women or lactation periods when taken orally, intravenously, or intramuscularly in an appropriate manner. Women over 19 years of age not more than 2000 mg daily Women 18 to 18 years old not more than 1800 mg daily Taking too much vitamin C during pregnancy can cause problems for the newborn baby. Excessive vitamin C intake is not safe when taken by mouth. Babies and children Consumption of this vitamin is probably safe when taken by mouth at appropriate doses. Its consumption is not safe in children from 1 to 3 years when taken by mouth in amounts higher than 400 mg daily, 650 mg per day for children aged 4 to 8, and 1800 mg per day for adolescents aged 14 to 18 years. Highs for prolonged periods should be used with caution in the following cases and conditions: Healthy adults who take large doses of vitamin C may experience low levels when they stop taking high doses and resume normal intake of this vitamin. Diabetes, hypoglycemia, or taking medications, herbs, or supplements that
  18. 18. affect blood sugar levels In this case, blood glucose levels should be monitored by a qualified professional to make adjustments and are necessary. In older women with diabetes, vitamin C in amounts greater than 300 mg per day increases the risk of death from heart disease. Use vitamin C chewable tablets cautiously as dental erosion can often occur. In myocardial infarction. Vitamin C levels are reduced during a heart attack. However, low vitamin C has not been associated with an increased risk of heart attack. In people who take antibiotics, anti-cancer agents, HIV medications, barbiturates, estrogens, fluphenazine, or iron supplements. Contraindications High doses of vitamin C are contraindicated in the following cases and conditions:  Allergy or known sensitivity to any of the ingredients that make up vitamin C supplements.  Sickle cell disease as it could worsen this condition.  Cancer, since cancer cells accumulate high concentrations of vitamin C and until more is known, only high doses of vitamin C are used under the supervision of the oncologist.  Hypertension because vitamin C can raise blood pressure.  In people after an angioplasty because it seems to intervene in the proper healing.  Pregnant women at risk of high blood pressure during pregnancy  In women who are breastfeeding.  Diseases that may be aggravated by increased acid such as advanced liver disease, gout, or renal failure.  Kidney failure or people taking agents that can damage the kidneys Interactions With medicines Aluminum Aluminum is found in most antacids. Vitamin C can increase aluminum absorption. However, it is not clear whether this interaction is important for what is recommended, to take vitamin C, 2 or 4 hours before after any antacid. Estrogen The body breaks down estrogens to get rid of them. Vitamin C may decrease how quickly the body gets rid of estrogens by which it can increase its therapeutic and secondary effects. Fluphenazine (Prolixina) The consumption of vitamin C in large quantities could decrease the amount of fluphenazine (Prolixina) present in the body which could decrease its efficacy.
  19. 19. Medications for cancer (chemotherapy) Because vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant, there is some concern about the decrease that could cause the efficacy of drugs used in chemotherapy. However, clinical studies are needed to support this hypothesis. Drugs used for HIV/AIDS (protease inhibitors) Large doses of vitamin C may decrease the amount in the body of some medications used to treat HIV/AIDS, which may decrease their efficacy. Some of these drugs used for HIV/AIDS include:  Amprenavir (Age erase)  Nelfinavir (Viracept)  Ritonavir (Norvir) and Saquinavir (Fort vase, inverse). Medications used to lower cholesterol (stations) Consuming a combination of vitamin C, beta-carotene, selenium, and vitamin E may decrease the efficacy of some medications used to lower cholesterol. It is not known whether vitamin C alone decreases the efficacy of these drugs. Some medications used to lower cholesterol include:  Atorvastatin (Lipitor)  Fluvastatin (Lecco)  Lovastatin (Evictor) and Pravastatin (Pravachol). Niacin The combination of vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, and selenium may decrease some of the beneficial effects of niacin. Since niacin can increase good cholesterol, vitamin C intake in combination with such vitamins and minerals could decrease the efficacy of this drug to increase good cholesterol. Anticoagulants High-dose vitamin C may interfere with the effects of anticoagulant medications. Some of these medicines include:  Warfare (Coumadin ®) or heparin  Ant platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plaid)
  20. 20. Medications for diabetes Vitamin C can affect blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also cause the same effect. People who take insulin or medications for diabetes by mouth should be monitored closely by the doctor, to suspend or make the necessary adjustments. Some of these medicines include:  Carbone (Pandas, Preset)  Acetohexamide (Demerol)  Chlorpropamide (Diabetes)  Glimepiride (Am aryl)  Glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL)  Glyburide or Glibenclamide (Diabetes, Glynatsis, Micronesia)  Motorman (Glucophage)  Miglitol (Gayest)  Phenformin  Pioglitazone (Acts)  Rosiglitazone (Avandia)  Repaginate (Prancing)  Tolazamide (Towlines)  Tolbutamide (urinate)  Troglitazone (Resoling) and others. Hypertensive Vitamin C can affect blood pressure. Caution is advised in people taking blood pressure-affecting agents.
  21. 21. With herbs and supplements Liposomal vitamin c may interact with herbs and supplements that affect:  Blood sugar  Blood pressure  The flow of urine  Hormonal levels  The immune system  Inhibit the altos reeducates  Antibacterial Herbs and supplements used to treat the following conditions:  Cancer  High cholesterol  Parkinson's disease  Asthma  Birth Control  Heart disease  Pulmonary diseases  Gastrointestinal diseases  Skin diseases  Eye diseases  Kidney disease Among these supplements, minerals and herbs are also included:  Aerial  Rosehip  Copper  Grape Seed Extract  Grapefruit  Herbs and hormone Supplements  Iron  Lute in  Niacin  Phytoestrogens  Fitoprogesteronas  Salicylates  acidifying supplements,  Vitamins B12 and E.
  22. 22. Quicksilver Scientific Address: 1376 Miners Dr., Suite 103, Lafayette, CO 80026, USA Main Phone: 1-303-531-0861 All inquiries: support@quicksilverscientific.com

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