Civil War Battles

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  • If you would, please go back to editing your Civil War presentation and add the two word tag 'civil war' (with the single ' quotation mark at both ends of this phrase, and join me and just a few others who have similarly tagged our SlideShare presentations as pertaining to the 'civil war'. Thanks. I am 'majordomoers' at SlideShare...
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Civil War Battles

  1. 1. You need to find the key words in the word search – relating to the Civil War! Cavalier Roundhead Edgehill Cromwell Prince Rupert Fairfax Pym Ireton Charles I Parliament New Model Army Marston Moor Naseby EXT TASK – WRITE DEFINITIONS FOR THE KEY WORDS ON THE BACK OF THIS PAGE! C T Y U I P A R L I A M E N T H E A U N M X C V B N M K L O A F L P C A V A L I E R U I P R Q Z K J R S H D F G O H G Y L Q N H U S K E L P I U P Y M E S O Y Y T Q W B E I N O U R S S T E R O U I Z Y H D H P A I T E S D N A H X C G H L F L P I R Q W M C R O M W E L L E L L I D F O A S E I O A O K D K J O L P O Y D D F H D J J O T H F A I R F A X I S C M E M S Q W S G H J K L N B V C X W P R I N C E R U P E R T Z A E Y P L L I H E G D E O I N B N
  2. 2. You need to find the key words in the word search – relating to the Civil War! Cavalier Roundhead Edgehill Cromwell Prince Rupert Fairfax Pym Ireton Charles I Parliament New Model Army Maston Moor Naseby C P A R L I A M E N T H N M A C A V A L I E R R R S O Y L N S E U P Y M E O T B N R S T O Y D A I E N H L R M C R O M W E L L E I O A D O D O F A I R F A X M W P R I N C E R U P E R T E L L I H E G D E N
  3. 3. What questions would you like to ask the people in this drawing from the Civil War? (Think of as many as possible!)
  4. 4. between 1642 And 1646 england was torn apart by a bloody civil war On the one hand stood the supporters of king charles I: the Royalists. on the other stood the supporters of the rights and privileges of parliament: the parliamentarians. shortly before the war broke out, partisans of both sides began to apply an insulting nickname to their opponents, little dreaming that the two scornful labels which they had chosen for each other would ring down through the succeeding centuries. to the Parliamentarians the Royalists were 'Cavaliers' - a term derived from the spanish word 'Caballeros', meaning armed troopers or horsemen To the Royalists, the Parliamentarians were 'Roundheads' - a reference to the shaved heads of the London apprentices who had been so active in demonstrating their support for Parliament during the months before the fighting began Can you punctuate this text correctly? (Add, or takeaway full stops, commas, hyphens. Change lower case letters to capital ones.)
  5. 5. Between 1642 and 1646 England was torn apart by a bloody civil war. On the one hand stood the supporters of King Charles I: the Royalists. On the other stood the supporters of the rights and privileges of Parliament: the Parliamentarians. Shortly before the war broke out, partisans of both sides began to apply an insulting nickname to their opponents, little dreaming that the two scornful labels which they had chosen for each other would ring down through the succeeding centuries. To the Parliamentarians, the Royalists were 'Cavaliers' - a term derived from the Spanish word 'Caballeros', meaning armed troopers or horsemen. To the Royalists, the Parliamentarians were 'Roundheads' - a reference to the shaved heads of the London apprentices who had been so active in demonstrating their support for Parliament during the months before the fighting began.
  6. 6. The following words are spelt incorrectly. Can you help me out, and spell them properly please? Parliment King Charlles The Batle of Hedgehill Cavalears Wroundheads Kromwell Prince Roopert
  7. 7. History Department starter Think of 5 questions you would like to ask about this painting
  8. 8. By the end of the lesson we will have…. General feedback <ul><li>Essays: majority level 5 or level 6  </li></ul><ul><li>Spelling of key words </li></ul><ul><li>Extended conclusion? THINK </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback comments from your assessment : thank you </li></ul>
  9. 9. 2 ND DRAFT ESSAYS PLEASE
  10. 10. Assessment 3 scores anyone?
  11. 11. Assessment 3 Fill in targets and comments
  12. 12. By the end of the lesson we will have…. Admin session 10 mins <ul><li>Assessment # 3 scores : put them in your green folder </li></ul><ul><li>Update your red/blue book scores with Assessment 3 score and also your NC levelled score from your 2 nd draft essay </li></ul>
  13. 13. By the end of the lesson we will have…. Level record QB Friars Monastery 2 nd draft Civil War Causes Essay
  14. 14. By the end of the lesson we will have…. Merits & Comment Wall
  15. 15. By the end of the lesson we will have…. Essay # 2 nd draft feedback
  16. 16. By the end of the lesson we will have…. <ul><li>1 st – 2 nd draft = improvement </li></ul><ul><li>When I give feedback / corrections = change things in the 2 nd draft [Naeem] </li></ul><ul><li>HK [Demi] </li></ul>
  17. 17. By the end of the lesson we will have…. <ul><li>Staggering quality </li></ul><ul><li>L7, L6 = Amazing achievement in Year 8 </li></ul><ul><li>Parental support </li></ul><ul><li>You put in, what you get out..... </li></ul>
  18. 18. By the end of the lesson we will have…. <ul><li>Years – we’re History, so stick a few dates in.  </li></ul><ul><li>RTTQ </li></ul><ul><li>ATQ </li></ul><ul><li>Josh? </li></ul>
  19. 19. By the end of the lesson we will have…. <ul><li>Years – we’re History, so stick a few dates in.  </li></ul><ul><li>RTTQ </li></ul><ul><li>ATQ </li></ul><ul><li>Josh? </li></ul>
  20. 20. By the end of the lesson we will have…. <ul><li>Doodling [Asaan, Asma] </li></ul><ul><li>Sheets stuck in  </li></ul><ul><li>5WH – way of recording information [Jordan] </li></ul><ul><li>ELC </li></ul>
  21. 21. By the end of the lesson we will have…. <ul><li>Student Public / History / ENG Civil War </li></ul><ul><li>BattleICT – follow the hyperlinks </li></ul><ul><li>EXT activity for anyone who finishes...... </li></ul>
  22. 22. By the end of the lesson we will have…. Begun to complete our grid examining the Key Events of The Civil War Discussed the first major Battle at EdgeHill, Kineton Learning outcome The English civil war lesson 1
  23. 23. By the end of the lesson we will have…. Discussed the next major battles : Roundway Down & Newbury via a computer simulation Learning outcome The English civil war lesson 2
  24. 24. By the end of the lesson we will have…. Examined the Battles of Marston Moor & Naseby Evaluated the creation of the New Model Army Learning outcome The English civil war lesson 3
  25. 25. By the end of the lesson we will have…. How on earth could the English kill their King?
  26. 26. By the end of the lesson we will have….
  27. 27. By the end of the lesson we will have…. Historical skill Significance Cause & Consequence Chronology Change & Continuity Cultural, religious & ethnic diversity Interpretation
  28. 28. I talk to people when I need help. I can explain what needs doing and why. I know how to deal with problems. I can see what needs improving. I use different viewpoints to reach a shared solution. I can support other people in their views and beliefs. I work well with others. I listen to others’ points of view. I change my behaviour to suit the situation. I respect other people’s differences. I take responsibility. I help others by giving them useful advice. I can generate ideas and possibilities. I ask questions to find out more. I can see how ideas or pieces of information fit together. I challenge ideas and assumptions that I make or that others make. I test ideas. I change ideas when I need to. I can see what has worked well and what hasn’t worked well. I know my targets and what I have to do to meet them. As I work, I can see how well I am doing. I listen to the advice of adults and people in my class. I learn from my mistakes. I let people know how I learn best. I like a new challenge. I work to goals and commit myself to tasks. I get to lessons on time with the equipment I need. I take risks and deal with them sensibly. I plan my own time and work to deadlines. I am able to deal with change. Effective Participator Team worker Creative thinkers Reflective Learner Self-Manager I can spot questions and problems that need answering and solving. I can plan and carry out a piece of research. I can look at things from different points of view. I can think about how important or relevant some information is. I can see how decisions or events are influenced by different points of view, beliefs or circumstances. I can back up points of view using arguments and evidence. Independent Enquirer
  29. 29. Effective participator I talk to people when I need help. I can explain what needs doing and why. I know how to deal with problems. I see what needs to be improved. I work with others to reach solutions. I can support other people in their views and beliefs. Team worker I work well with others. I listen to others’ points of view. I know how to behave in formal and informal situations. I respect other people’s differences. I take responsibility for my role within the group. I help others by giving them useful advice. Self-Manager I like a new challenge. I work towards goals and commit myself to tasks. I get to lessons on time with the equipment I need. I am not afraid to have a go at new things. I plan my own time and work to deadlines. I am able to deal with change. Independent Enquirer I can spot questions and problems that need answering and solving. I can plan and carry out a piece of research. I can look at things from different points of view. I can think about how important or relevant some information is. I can see how decisions or events are effected by different points of view, beliefs or circumstances. I can back up points of view.
  30. 30. By the end of the lesson we will have….
  31. 31. We are going to watch a clip from this DVD again. However we are going to examine the battle scenes as that is what we are moving onto next in History. The Civil War has started. Whilst the film is on you need to complete a 5 W note taking exercise Obj:- Describe the early battles in the English Civil War Task 1 45min, 44 secs
  32. 32. What (is happening)? Why (is it happening)? Who (is involved)? Where (is it taking place)? When (is it taking place)? (i.e. dates) Cromwell DVD 5WH
  33. 33. History Department KEY EVENT Location, conditions etc DATE WHAT HAPPENED? Who won? How did they win? Tactics? Outcomes? What should people have done? KEY INDIVIDUALS Whose side were they on? Impact or role? Significance?
  34. 34. History Department KEY EVENT Location, conditions etc DATE WHAT HAPPENED? Who won? How did they win? Tactics? Outcomes? What should people have done? KEY INDIVIDUALS Whose side were they on? Impact or role? Significance?
  35. 36. History Department The Battle of Edgehill , October 1642 Edgehill, Kineton, Warwickshire
  36. 37. History Department The Battle of Edgehill , October 1642 Battle of Edgehill Part of the First English Civil War Date October 23 , 1642 Location Edge Hill, Warwickshire Result Inconclusive Combatants Royalists Parliamentarians Commanders Charles I of England , Prince Rupert of the Rhine Earl of Essex Strength 2,500 horse, 800 dragoons, 9,100 foot, 16 guns 2,300 horse, 700 dragoons, 12,000 foot, 7 guns
  37. 38. Parliament’s Army(Roundheads) Royalist Army (Cavaliers)
  38. 39. <ul><li>In October, 1642, Charles I and his Royalist forces began marching on London . The Parliamentary army attempted to block their way and engaged the Royalists at Edgehill on 23rd October. </li></ul><ul><li>It is estimated that both sides had around 14,000 men. </li></ul><ul><li>Prince Rupert and his Cavaliers made the first attack and easily defeated Robert Devereux , the commander of the left-wing of the Parliamentary forces. Henry Wilmot also had success on the right-wing and this left the foot soldiers of both sides to fight it out in the centre. </li></ul><ul><li>The Parliamentarians held their line and their calvary managed to attack the Royalist flank. </li></ul><ul><li>Prince Rupert's cavalrymen lacked discipline and continued to follow those who ran from the battlefield. John Byron and his regiment also joined the chase. The royalist calvary did not return to the battlefield until over an hour after the initial charge. By this time the horses were so tired they were unable to mount another attack against the Roundheads . The fighting ended at nightfall. </li></ul><ul><li>Robert Devereux decided to withdraw his men to Warwick. This left the Royalists free to march on London . </li></ul><ul><li>However, Charles I decided to make his way to Oxford , which became his headquarters for the duration of the war. </li></ul>
  39. 40. Read the sheet:- Using the highlighter pens underline any key words / people / events / facts / words you don’t understand
  40. 41. <ul><li>In October, 1642, Charles I and his Royalist forces began marching on London . The Parliamentary army attempted to block their way and engaged the Royalists at Edgehill on 23rd October. </li></ul><ul><li>It is estimated that both sides had around 14,000 men. </li></ul><ul><li>Prince Rupert and his Cavaliers made the first attack and easily defeated Robert Devereux , </li></ul><ul><li>The Parliamentarians held their line and their Calvary managed to attack the Royalist flank. </li></ul><ul><li>Prince Rupert's cavalrymen,lacked discipline and, continued to follow those who ran from the battlefield. </li></ul><ul><li>The fighting ended at nightfall. </li></ul><ul><li>Robert Devereux decided to withdraw his men to Warwick. This left the Royalists free to march on London . </li></ul><ul><li>However, Charles I decided to make his way to Oxford , which became his headquarters for the duration of the war. </li></ul>
  41. 42. The Key Events of the Civil War grid KEY EVENT DATE WHAT HAPPENED? KEY INDIVIDUALS
  42. 43. IN PAIRS
  43. 45. The Battle of Edgehill , October 1642 <ul><li>Read the four(4) sources A-D relating to the battle. </li></ul><ul><li>Decide whether each source is either Primary or Secondary </li></ul><ul><li>Which side are the majority of sources written from? (Royalist/Parliamentarian). Why do you think that may be? </li></ul><ul><li>Who do you think won the Battle of Edgehill? Why do you say that? </li></ul><ul><li>Does the battle seem to show that either side was well organised and disciplined? Why? </li></ul><ul><li>Charles decided not to go to London – and he went to Oxford instead. Was this a good/bad decision? Justify your answer. </li></ul><ul><li>7. Go to your A3 paper, and both fill in part of the grid relating to the Battle of Edgehill </li></ul>
  44. 46. We’ve just had this news report reach us.....
  45. 48. By the end of the lesson we will have…. Completed the second box on our grid and have analysed the Battle of Roundway Down
  46. 49. Battle of Roundway Down Part of English Civil War Date July 13 , 1643 Location near Devizes , Wiltshire Result Decisive Royalist victory Combatants Parliamentarians Royalists Commanders Sir William Waller Sir Arthur Haselrig Lord Hopton Lord Wilmot Strength c 2,500 horse c 1,800 foot 8 guns 1,800 horse c 2,000 foot 2 light guns Casualties 600 killed 1,000 captured unknown
  47. 50. Roundway, Devizes In the West Country
  48. 51. History Department The Battle of Roundway Down, July 1643 <ul><li>Royalist forces led by Henry Wilmot and John Byron encountered William Waller and his Parliamentary army at Roundway Down, near Devizes, on 13th July, 1643. </li></ul><ul><li>Arthur Haselrig, commander of Parliamentary forces on the right, made the first charge but it was easily repelled by Wilmot's men. </li></ul><ul><li>Waller now attacked but failed to make any headway against the Royalist forces. </li></ul><ul><li>Wilmot and Byron now counter attacked and the Roundheads were forced to flee. </li></ul><ul><li>The battle at Roundway Down resulted in Parliament losing 1,500 soldiers and established that Charles I had full control over the West Country. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>A) Richard Atkins, was a Captain in the Royalist army. On 13 July, 1643, he took part in the Royalist victory at Roundway Down. In this extract Atkins describes trying to kill General Arthur Haselrig, the leader of the parliamentary army at Roundway Down. It was my fortune to charge Sir Arthur Hesilrige... He discharged his carbine first but at a distance not to hurt us... I then... discharged mine; I'm sure I hit him, for he staggered and wheeled off from his party and ran... I pursued him... and in six score yards I came up to him, and discharged the other pistol at him, and I am sure I hit his head... but he was too well armed all over for a pistol bullet to do him any hurt, having a coat of mail over his arms and a headpiece that was musket proof... I employed myself in killing his horse, and cut him in several places... the horse began to faint with bleeding, and Sir Arthur fell off. Then a group of troopers... charged and rescued him.  
  49. 52. History Department The Battle of Roundway Down, July 1643 <ul><li>Royalist forces led by Henry Wilmot and John Byron encountered William Waller and his Parliamentary army at Roundway Down, near Devizes, on 13th July, 1643. </li></ul><ul><li>Arthur Haselrig, commander of Parliamentary forces on the right, made the first charge but it was easily repelled by Wilmot's men. </li></ul><ul><li>Waller now attacked but failed to make any headway against the Royalist forces. </li></ul><ul><li>Wilmot and Byron now counter attacked and the Roundheads were forced to flee. </li></ul><ul><li>The battle at Roundway Down resulted in Parliament losing 1,500 soldiers and established that Charles I had full control over the West Country. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Richard Atkins, was a Captain in the Royalist army. On 13 July, 1643, he took part in the Royalist victory at Roundway Down. </li></ul><ul><li>It was my fortune to charge Sir Arthur Hesilrige... He discharged his carbine first but at a distance not to hurt us... I then... discharged mine; I'm sure I hit him, for he staggered and wheeled off from his party and ran... I pursued him... and in six score yards I came up to him, and discharged the other pistol at him, and I am sure I hit his head... the horse began to faint with bleeding, and Sir Arthur fell off. Then a group of troopers... charged and rescued him. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
  50. 53. The Battle of Roundway Down, July 1643 <ul><li>Royalist forces led by Henry Wilmot and John Byron encountered William Waller and his Parliamentary army at Roundway Down, near Devizes, on 13th July, 1643. </li></ul><ul><li>Arthur Haselrig, commander of Parliamentary forces on the right, made the first charge but it was easily repelled by Wilmot's men. </li></ul><ul><li>Wilmot and Byron now counter attacked and the Roundheads were forced to flee. </li></ul><ul><li>The battle at Roundway Down resulted in Parliament losing 1,500 soldiers </li></ul><ul><li>Charles now controlled the West Country </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Richard Atkins, was a Captain in the Royalist army. On 13 July, 1643, he took part in the Royalist victory at Roundway Down. </li></ul><ul><li>It was my fortune to charge Sir Arthur Hesilrige... He discharged his carbine first but at a distance not to hurt us... I then... discharged mine; I'm sure I hit him, the horse began to faint with bleeding, and Sir Arthur fell off. Then a group of troopers... charged and rescued him. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
  51. 54. The Battle of Roundway Down, July 1643 1.Where in England did this battle take place? Is this significant? 2.Who won the battle? Was Haselrig killed? 3.Now go to your A3 grid and fill in the information for this battle
  52. 55. Battle of Newbury Part of English Civil War Date October 27 , 1644 Location Newbury, Berkshire Result Indecisive Parliamentarian victory Combatants Parliamentarians Royalists Commanders Earl of Essex Sir William Waller Earl of Manchester King Charles I Prince Maurice Strength 7,000 horse 12,000 foot 3,500 horse 5,000 foot Casualties unknown unknown
  53. 56. History Department The Battle of Newbury , August 1643 <ul><li>In August 1643, Charles I and his army surrounded Gloucester but withdrew to avoid a confrontation when Robert Devereux , Earl of Essex, arrived the relieve the city. </li></ul><ul><li>Royalist forces now moved to block the Parliamentary army's return to London . </li></ul><ul><li>Charles I , with 8,000 foot soldiers and 6,000 cavalrymen, set up defensive positions to the west of Newbury. </li></ul><ul><li>Prince Rupert was in command of the cavalry and Jacob Astley the infantry. </li></ul><ul><li>Robert Devereux arrived with 10,000 foot soldiers and 4,000 cavalrymen. Although he arrived after the Royalists he managed to secure the best ground at Round Hill. </li></ul><ul><li>An attack led by John Byron and his Cavaliers failed to capture the position from the Roundheads . </li></ul><ul><li>The Royalists ran short of ammunition and that night, despite the protests of Prince Rupert and John Byron , the king decided to withdraw to Oxford . </li></ul><ul><li>This enabled Robert Devereux and his Parliamentary army to return to London . </li></ul>
  54. 58. The Battle of Newbury , August 1643 <ul><li>In August 1643, Charles I and his army surrounded Gloucester but withdrew to avoid a confrontation when Robert Devereux , Earl of Essex, arrived the relieve the city. </li></ul><ul><li>Charles I , with 8,000 foot soldiers and 6,000 cavalrymen, set up defensive positions to the west of Newbury. </li></ul><ul><li>Prince Rupert was in command of the cavalry and Jacob Astley the infantry. </li></ul><ul><li>Robert Devereux arrived with 10,000 foot soldiers and 4,000 cavalrymen. Although he arrived after the Royalists he managed to secure the best ground at Round Hill. </li></ul><ul><li>The Royalists ran short of ammunition and that night, despite the protests of Prince Rupert and John Byron , the king decided to withdraw to Oxford . </li></ul><ul><li>This enabled Robert Devereux and his Parliamentary army to return to London . </li></ul>
  55. 59. The Battle of Newbury , August 1643 1.Newbury is one of the lesser known battles of the Civil War. Who won it? 2.Which side seemed to adopt the better tactics? 3.What was the significance of Charles setting up base in Oxford as opposed to London? 4.What could the benefit be to the Parliamentarians of controlling London? 5.Now refer back to your A3 sheet and fill in the information for Newbury.
  56. 60. History Department KEY EVENT Location, conditions etc DATE WHAT HAPPENED? Who won? How did they win? Tactics? Outcomes? What should people have done? KEY INDIVIDUALS Whose side were they on? Impact or role? Significance?
  57. 61. Learning outcome Examine the changing fortunes of the two sides by looking at the battle at Marston Moor
  58. 62. Remember these people....?
  59. 63. The Scots..... <ul><li>So tough the Romans built a wall to keep them out </li></ul><ul><li>Can beat up the English at will </li></ul><ul><li>The men wear skirts: that’s how tough they are! :-) </li></ul>
  60. 64. Battle of Marston Moor Part of English Civil War The Battle of Marston Moor , by J. Barker Date July 2 , 1644 Location near Long Marston, 7 miles west of York Result Decisive Parliamentarian victory Combatants Scottish Covenanters , Parliamentarians Royalists Commanders Earl of Leven , Earl of Manchester , Lord Fairfax Prince Rupert of the Rhine , Marquess of Newcastle Strength 7,000 horse, 500+ dragoons, 14,000 foot, 30 - 40 guns 6,000 horse, 11,000 foot, 14 guns Casualties 300 killed 4,000 killed, 1,500 prisoners
  61. 65. <ul><li>In 1644 the Scots joined forces with Parliamentary forces to lay siege to the Royalist held city of York . </li></ul><ul><li>In June 1644 Prince Rupert and his Cavaliers set out to rescue the Earl of Newcastle and his forces. </li></ul><ul><li>On 2nd July the Royalists confronted the Parliamentarians at Marston Moor. </li></ul><ul><li>Edward Montagu and Thomas Fairfax , the leaders of the Parliamentary forces, decided to withdraw from Marston Moor towards Tadcaster in order to cut off any attempt by the Earl of Newcastle to escape. </li></ul><ul><li>Prince Rupert decided to attack the retreating troops. This resulted in the Parliamentary army being ordered back to Marston Moor. </li></ul><ul><li>That afternoon Oliver Cromwell and his forces charged John Byron and his cavalry. His men, instead of pursuing Byron's cavalry, regrouped and returned to protect the infantry that had now come under attack from George Goring and his cavalry. </li></ul><ul><li>The Earl of Newcastle and his Whitecoat regiment made a heroic last stand and resisted repeated charges by the Parliamentary army until no more than 30 were left alive. </li></ul><ul><li>The battle lasted two hours. </li></ul><ul><li>Over 3,000 Royalists were killed and around 4,500 were taken prisoner. The Parliamentary forces lost only 300 men. </li></ul><ul><li>The city of York surrendered two weeks after the battle, ending Royalist power in the north of England. </li></ul><ul><li>Prince Rupert rallied the survivors and retreated to Chester where he attempted to build a new Royalist army . </li></ul>Marston Moor, July 1644
  62. 66. <ul><li>In 1644 the Scots joined forces with Parliamentary forces to lay siege to the Royalist held city of York . </li></ul><ul><li>In June 1644 Prince Rupert and his Cavaliers set out to rescue the Earl of Newcastle and his forces. </li></ul><ul><li>On 2nd July the Royalists confronted the Parliamentarians at Marston Moor. </li></ul><ul><li>That afternoon Oliver Cromwell and his forces charged John Byron and his cavalry. His men, instead of pursuing Byron's cavalry, regrouped and returned to protect the infantry that had now come under attack from George Goring and his cavalry. </li></ul><ul><li>The Earl of Newcastle and his Whitecoat regiment made a heroic last stand and resisted repeated charges by the Parliamentary army until no more than 30 were left alive. </li></ul><ul><li>The battle lasted two hours. </li></ul><ul><li>Over 3,000 Royalists were killed and around 4,500 were taken prisoner. The Parliamentary forces lost only 300 men. </li></ul><ul><li>The city of York surrendered two weeks after the battle, ending Royalist power in the north of England. </li></ul>
  63. 67. <ul><li>In 1644 the Scots joined forces with Parliamentary forces to lay siege to the Royalist held city of York . </li></ul><ul><li>On 2nd July the Royalists confronted the Parliamentarians at Marston Moor. </li></ul><ul><li>That afternoon Oliver Cromwell and his forces charged John Byron and his cavalry. His men, instead of pursuing Byron's cavalry, regrouped and returned to protect the infantry that had now come under attack from George Goring and his cavalry. </li></ul><ul><li>The Earl of Newcastle and his regiment made a heroic last stand until no more than 30 were left alive. </li></ul><ul><li>The battle lasted two hours. </li></ul><ul><li>Over 3,000 Royalists were killed and around 4,500 were taken prisoner. The Parliamentary forces lost only 300 men. </li></ul><ul><li>The city of York surrendered two weeks after the battle, ending Royalist power in the north of England. </li></ul>
  64. 68. <ul><li>Why do you think the Scots got involved in the Civil War at this stage? Which side were they on, and why? </li></ul><ul><li>Who were the leaders of the Parliamentary forces at this time? </li></ul><ul><li>How many Royalists were either captured or killed? What is this like as a comparison with the Parliamentarians? Why could this be? </li></ul><ul><li>What was the significance of winning this battle geographically for the Parliamentarian side? Where else did they control at this time of the battle? </li></ul><ul><li>Use this information and fill in your A3 sheet </li></ul>
  65. 69. A3
  66. 70. History Department KEY EVENT Location, conditions etc DATE WHAT HAPPENED? Who won? How did they win? Tactics? Outcomes? What should people have done? KEY INDIVIDUALS Whose side were they on? Impact or role? Significance?
  67. 72. Learning Outcome By the end of this section we will have….. Analysed the creation of the deciding factor in the Civil War namely the New Model Army. (N.M.A.)
  68. 73. N.M.A.
  69. 74. Roundheads trained hard...
  70. 75. The New Model Army <ul><li>In February 1645, Parliament decided to form a new army of professional soldiers and amalgamated the three armies of William Waller , Earl of Essex and Earl of Manchester . </li></ul><ul><li>This army of 22,000 men became known as the New Model Army . Its commander-in-chief was General Thomas Fairfax , while Oliver Cromwell was put in charge of its cavalry. </li></ul><ul><li>Members of the New Model Army received proper military training and by the time they went into battle they were very well-disciplined. </li></ul><ul><li>In the past, people became officers because they came from powerful and wealthy families. </li></ul><ul><li>In the New Model Army men were promoted when they showed themselves to be good soldiers. For the first time it became possible for working-class men to become army officers. </li></ul><ul><li>Oliver Cromwell thought it was very important that soldiers in the New Model Army believed strongly in what they were fighting for. Where possible he recruited men who, like him, held strong Puritan views and the New Model Army went into battle singing psalms, convinced that God was on their side. </li></ul>
  71. 76. The New Model Army <ul><li>In February 1645, Parliament decided to form a new army of professional soldiers and amalgamated the three armies of William Waller , Earl of Essex and Earl of Manchester . </li></ul><ul><li>This army of 22,000 men became known as the New Model Army . </li></ul><ul><li>Its commander-in-chief was General Thomas Fairfax , while Oliver Cromwell was put in charge of its cavalry. </li></ul><ul><li>Members of the New Model Army received proper military training and by the time they went into battle they were very well-disciplined. </li></ul><ul><li>In the past, people became officers because they came from powerful and wealthy families – now men were promoted if they were good soldier </li></ul><ul><li>Oliver Cromwell thought it was very important that soldiers in the New Model Army believed strongly in what they were fighting for. Where possible he recruited men who, like him, held strong Puritan views. </li></ul>
  72. 77. Learning outcome By the end of this section we will have Investigated how the NMA led to victory at the Battle of Naseby
  73. 78. History Department KEY EVENT Location, conditions etc DATE WHAT HAPPENED? Who won? How did they win? Tactics? Outcomes? What should people have done? KEY INDIVIDUALS Whose side were they on? Impact or role? Significance?
  74. 79. Battle of Naseby Part of English Civil War Battle memorial and beyond, the fields of Broad Moor, the site of the Battle Date June 14 , 1645 Location Naseby , near Market Harborough , Northamptonshire Result Decisive Parliamentarian victory Combatants Parliamentarians Royalists Commanders Sir Thomas Fairfax Oliver Cromwell King Charles I Prince Rupert of the Rhine Strength 6,000 horse 7,000 foot 4,100 horse 3,300 foot Casualties 150 total casualties [1] approximately 1,000 killed, 5,000 captured [1]
  75. 80. History Department The Battle of Naseby 14 th June 1645 <ul><li>In February 1645, Parliament decided to form a new army of professional soldiers and amalgamated the three armies of William Waller , Earl of Essex and Earl of Manchester . </li></ul><ul><li>This army of 22,000 men became known as the New Model Army . </li></ul><ul><li>Its commander-in-chief was General Thomas Fairfax , while Oliver Cromwell was put in charge of its cavalry. </li></ul><ul><li>Members of the New Model Army received proper military training and by the time they went into battle they were very well-disciplined. In the past, people became officers because they came from powerful and wealthy families. In the New Model Army men were promoted when they showed themselves to be good soldiers. For the first time it became possible for working-class men to become army officers. </li></ul><ul><li>Oliver Cromwell thought it was very important that soldiers in the New Model Army believed strongly in what they were fighting for. Where possible he recruited men who, like him, held strong Puritan views and the New Model Army went into battle singing psalms, convinced that God was on their side. </li></ul>
  76. 81. History Department The Battle of Naseby 14 th June 1645 <ul><li>Charles I was waiting with 1,200 men in reserve. Instead of ordering them forward to help his infantry he decided to retreat. Without support from the cavalry, the royalist infantry realised their task was impossible and surrendered. </li></ul><ul><li>By the time Prince Rupert's cavalry returned to the battlefield the fighting had ended. Rupert's cavalry horses were exhausted after their long chase and were not in a fit state to take on Cromwell's cavalry. Prince Rupert had no option but to ride off in search of Charles I . </li></ul><ul><li>The battle was a disaster for the king . </li></ul><ul><li>About 1,000 of his men had been killed, while another 4,500 of his most experienced men had been taken prisoner. </li></ul><ul><li>The Parliamentary forces were also able to capture the Royalist baggage train that contained his complete stock of guns and ammunition. </li></ul><ul><li>The Battle of Naseby was the turning point in the war. After Naseby, Charles was never able to raise another army strong enough to defeat the parliamentary army in a major battle. </li></ul>The New Model Army took part in its first major battle just outside the village of Naseby in Northamptonshire on 14th June 1645. The battle began when Prince Rupert led a charge against the left wing of the parliamentary cavalry which scattered and Rupert's men then gave chase. While this was going on Oliver Cromwell launched an attack on the left wing of the royalist cavalry. This was also successful and the royalists that survived the initial charge fled from the battlefield. While some of Cromwell's cavalry gave chase, the majority were ordered to attack the now unprotected flanks of the infantry.
  77. 82. History Department The Battle of Naseby 14 th June 1645 and the New Model Army <ul><li>Which two people were in charge of the NMA. What were their roles? </li></ul><ul><li>Could Catholics join the NMA? </li></ul><ul><li>What was the advantage of allowing people from “working class” backgrounds into the NMA? </li></ul><ul><li>At the Battle of Naseby what tactics were employed by the NMA in order to achieve victory? Why were these different to the previous battles in the Civil War? </li></ul><ul><li>How many Royalist soldiers were killed, or taken prisoner? </li></ul><ul><li>Add this information to your A3 grid </li></ul><ul><li>Produce a poster on A4 paper persuading people to join the NMA – think about what type of things would have been promised by Cromwell, and why people should join the fight against the King. </li></ul>
  78. 83. Essay title:- ‘Parliament were rather lucky to have won the Civil War.’ How far do you agree with this statement?
  79. 84. Deadline :- blue book Tuesday 6 th November Planners out:- Detention on that day for 1 hour
  80. 85. <ul><li>Introduction:- 1 paragraph </li></ul><ul><li>Essay title:- “ Parliament were rather lucky to have won the Civil War.” How far do you agree with this statement </li></ul><ul><li>State whether you agree/disagree/ strongly agree/strongly disagree with the statement </li></ul><ul><li>You have to provide a commentary for the reader </li></ul><ul><li>Explain what the Civil War was, when it took place, who it was between and who won </li></ul><ul><li>Explain you will be examining the events from 1642-46 – and include an example of the areas you will be looking at (i.e. from your Data capture grid) </li></ul>
  81. 86. History Department <ul><li>Main body:- 4/5 paragraphs </li></ul><ul><li>Essay title:- “ Parliament were rather lucky to have won the Civil War.” How far do you agree with this statement </li></ul><ul><li>You need to look at the essay title and constantly refer to it </li></ul><ul><li>You need to look at the individual battles in chronological order. </li></ul><ul><li>And provide a commentary on what happened – in terms of whether Parliament were lucky or not. </li></ul><ul><li>Use words such as – Moreover, Another reason, Furthermore, Penultimatley , Lastly, A further reason, </li></ul><ul><li>For example…” A further reason Parliament was lucky….. Another reason Parliament was lucky….” </li></ul><ul><li>Remember to talk about the New Model Army. </li></ul>
  82. 87. History Department <ul><li>Conclusion:- 1 paragraph </li></ul><ul><li>Essay title:- “ Parliament were rather lucky to have won the Civil War.” How far do you agree with this statement </li></ul><ul><li>You need to re-answer the question again </li></ul><ul><li>And provide evidence…… (i.e. reasons from your data capture grid) </li></ul><ul><li>I think this because……… </li></ul><ul><li>I suggest this because………. </li></ul>

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