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Synopsis Report
EITI for Local Audiences: Communications Efforts to Contextualize EITI
Indonesia’s Report in Papua
Glossar...
Project Report Creating Communications Products to Contextualize EITI Indonesia for Local Audience in Papua
since 2005. In...
Indonesia) to be a guest speaker in that dialogue. However, she cancelled her attendance two days
before the dialog was he...
Project Report Creating Communications Products to Contextualize EITI Indonesia for Local Audience in Papua
indigenous Pap...
Challenges & Lessons Learned
Some challenges and lesson learned from the project are:
1. The lack of capacity from the imp...
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EITI for Local Audiences: Communications Efforts to Contextualize EITI Indonesia's Report in Papua

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Indonesia has announced its commitment to implement EITI (Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative) through the release of Presidential Regulation 26/2010. EITI is a global standard where Companies and Government report their payments and receipts of extractive industry revenues, to be reconciled through multi-stakeholder working groups. Indonesia has, or will shortly, produce reconciliation reports covering the 2009, 2010, and 2011 fiscal (and calendar) years.

Papua is one of Indonesia’s richest natural resource regions, with mining, oil and gas operations as well as forestry and fisheries. Papua and West Papua provinces are both special autonomy regions which receive extra-high portion of oil and gas revenue sharing known in Indonesian as Dana Bagi Hasil (DBH), compared to other provinces in Indonesia. These revenue sharing funds are supposed to flow to both provincial and district governments.

To make the EITI Indonesia report more relevant to local audience in Papua, AJI (Aliansi Jurnalis Independen) conduct a project that aims to create communications products in order to familiarize local audiences in Papua with EITI Indonesia report findings and other information about the extractive industries relevant for Papuans. AJI Papua collaborates with Publish What You Pay Indonesia, with support from Multi Donor Trust Fund (MDTF) administered by the World Bank.

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EITI for Local Audiences: Communications Efforts to Contextualize EITI Indonesia's Report in Papua

  1. 1. Synopsis Report EITI for Local Audiences: Communications Efforts to Contextualize EITI Indonesia’s Report in Papua Glossary AJI : Aliansi Jurnalis Independen or Alliance of Independent Journalist BP : British Petroleum CoW : Contract of Work CSO : Civil Society Organization DBH : Dana Bagi Hasil (revenue sharing by central government to sub-national) DPR : Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat (House of Representatives) EITI : Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative ESDM : Energi dan Sumber Daya Mineral (Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources) PSC : Production Sharing Contract PWYP : Publish What You Pay PT : Perseroan Terbatas LNG : Liquid Natural Gas MDTF : Multi Donor Trust Fund SMS : Short Message System TVRI : Televisi Republik Indonesia Background Indonesia has announced its commitment to implement EITI (Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative) through the release of Presidential Regulation 26/2010. EITI is a global standard where Companies and Government report their payments and receipts of extractive industry revenues, to be reconciled through multi-stakeholder working groups. Indonesia has, or will shortly, produce reconciliation reports covering the 2009, 2010, and 2011 fiscal (and calendar) years. Civil Society has played an important role in the emergence of EITI Indonesia. Since the beginning, civil society is a strong promoter of EITI, endorsing the initiative, formulating regulation and policy, making sure the scope of the reporting process is as complete as possible and monitoring EITI implementation. Whenever EITI Indonesia reports are launched, civil society uses the momentum to contextualize EITI Indonesia for national and local audiences to make it more meaningful for improved extractive industries governance. Papua is one of Indonesia’s richest natural resource regions, with mining, oil and gas operations as well as forestry and fisheries. Papua and West Papua provinces are both special autonomy regions which receive extra-high portion of oil and gas revenue sharing known in Indonesian as Dana Bagi Hasil (DBH), compared to other provinces in Indonesia. These revenue sharing funds are supposed to flow to both provincial and district governments. There are 248 tribes living in Papua and West Papua1 , spread across various locations including in the vicinity of mines. There are five producing oil & gas PSCs in West Papua, with production taking place in two districts, Sorong and Bintuni. In Bintuni is an LNG plant fed by operations from the Tangguh PSCs, one of the biggest producers of gas in Indonesia, operated by BP Indonesia 1 Department of Culture, Papua Government, 2008
  2. 2. Project Report Creating Communications Products to Contextualize EITI Indonesia for Local Audience in Papua since 2005. Indonesia’s biggest mining company also operates in Papua, PT. Freeport Indonesia (an affiliate of McMoRan Copper & Gold), which has operated since 1967. To make the EITI Indonesia report more relevant to local audience in Papua, AJI (Aliansi Jurnalis Independen) conduct a project that aims to create communications products in order to familiarize local audiences in Papua with EITI Indonesia report findings and other information about the extractive industries relevant for Papuans. AJI Papua collaborates with Publish What You Pay Indonesia, with support from Multi Donor Trust Fund (MDTF) administered by the World Bank. Objectives 1. Putting the EITI Indonesia report in context for local audiences in Papua and raising public awareness on the EITI Indonesia process 2. Enhancing participation of CSOs and media in the EITI Indonesia process Activities & Outputs 1. Producing Newsletters A series of newsletters was produced to elaborate the EITI Report and help make it relevant with the Papuan context, by emphasizing information related to the extractive industries in Papua. The content of the newsletter included, but was not limited to, the list of oil and gas companies with Production Sharing Contracts and mineral Contracts of Work (CoW) operating in Papua, what was stated about them in the EITI Indonesia report, information about revenue sharing transfer from central government to the local government, and other relevant information such as social welfare issues related to Papuans. The Newsletter was circulated to communities, indigenous people, civil society networks, journalists, students and youths, as well as to local governments and other stakeholders. 2. Interactive Dialogues on Local Television & Radio Interactive dialogues on local television and radio helped to familiarize local audiences in Papua with the EITI Indonesia report. The interactive dialogue was also used to discuss how audiences could improve extractive industries governance, particularly in the context of Papua. Interactive dialogue through local television and radio provided the public with the opportunity to raise their aspirations and provide feedback on EITI report and other issues related to extractive industries governance. The Resource persons invited to the interactive dialogue consisted of policy makers, companies and local CSOs whose work relates to the extractive industries, both in terms of policy and implementation. Interactive dialogues were held twice on TVRI’s “Lens on Papua” show, broadcast from the provincial capital, Jayapura. On screen, the first dialogue (July 10, 2013) were Mandenas Yan (regional parliament), Moses M (Head of Mining Papua) and Joshua Reba (ICS Director Papua). AJI’s secretariat corresponded with Daisy Primayanti (Director of Corporate Communication of PT Freeport
  3. 3. Indonesia) to be a guest speaker in that dialogue. However, she cancelled her attendance two days before the dialog was held. Even though the theme of the dialogue was the socialization of the EITI Indonesia report, most of the feedback from the audience was related to the PT. Freeport Indonesia operation in Papua. Questions from the audience mostly pertained to issues of access and involvement of the Papuan people in the mining operation, education and skill improvement for the local people, as well as whether local people could be included in contract renegotiation. The second interactive dialogue was also conducted on TVRI, with theme “Transparency of Mining Operations in Papua” (August 31, 2013). The speaker in this dialogue were Mr. Fred Borai (Secretary of the local office of Mining and Energy, Papua), Charles Tawaru (Greenpeace activist in Papua) with the role of moderator provided by Victor Mambor (Head of AJI Papua). The main response from the audience related to their vision of the company starting to provide more benefits to the community from its operations. Interactive dialogues were also conducted on radio, in the city of Jayapura. The dialog was broadcasted through Studio LPP RRI Jayapura (June 14, 2014) and Radio Kenembay Umbay (June 16, 2014). The main speakers on both interactive dialogues were head of mining department from the local government, environmental organizations in Papua, as well as a representative from Publish What You Pay Indonesia. The general comments and feedback from the audience were related to the importance of the report for the rights of indigenous people in Papua, as well as whether local government might be given a role in the contract renegotiation process. Another concern that rose during the sessions was related to the EITI Indonesia report itself. Hopes were expressed that, in the future, the report could be easier to understand and more user-friendly, especially for the communities in the vicinity of mines. 3. News Cafe - Press Conference News Café is a popular term in Papua for an activity conducted by AJI for the purpose of raising specific issues for discussion by members of the public from various backgrounds, CSOs, youth groups, students, as well as local government and communities. News Cafe events are also attended by journalist from various media. Although there are resources persons available to help stimulate the discussions, participants do most of the talking during the discussions. This activity took place three times. The resource persons during the first dialogue was Yan Mandenas (Member of Papua’s Parliament) and the Chairman of AJI Papua. News Cafe I discussed the findings of the first EITI Indonesia report. News Cafe II was conducted with Bagubau Tobias (an Indigenous Person’s representative) as a resource person. News Cafe II discussed “the benefits of mining forPicture 4. Press Conference on News-Cafe Picture 3. Radio Talkshow in Jayapura
  4. 4. Project Report Creating Communications Products to Contextualize EITI Indonesia for Local Audience in Papua indigenous Papuans.” News Cafe III was done with resource persons from Publish What You Pay Indonesia, an academician and a local environmental activist. Discussions during the various News Cafe events mostly focused on popular and indigenous rights with respect to mining operations, the impact of extractive operations on communities, as well as the importance of environmental standards and impact analyses on extractive industries operations. One other matter of concern was the need for transparency in licensing processes, especially related to artisanal mining (Pertambangan Rakyat) in Papua, where some members of the community and indigenous people work as miners in traditional mining operations. 4. SMS Gateway Key facts and findings from EITI Indonesia's reports, important pointers and topics arising from the interactive dialogues and press conferences were delivered to the wider community via an SMS Gateway facility. Topics and pointers were sent to more than 500 mobile phone numbers. This activity created mechanisms of accountability for the extractive industries and enhanced the capacity of CSOs / NGOs to get involved and contribute to the EITI process. This facility was implemented and controlled from AJI’s website (http://ajipapua.org/eiti). The recipients of messages are shown in the picture, covering all districts in Papua. Text responses came back in from the audience, and related to the data reported by EITI Indonesia, words of thanks, the role of CSOs in endorsing the transparency, as well as the apparent contradiction between the fantastically high number of revenue payments by companies to the state and the number of poor people in Papua. The following is a typical comment: “Jumlah angka sangat fantastis, sama juga dengan jumlah kemiskinan, hehe. Tapi terima kasih atas infonya ya,” which can be translated as “The total (revenue) figures are fantastically large, almost equal to our poverty level, ha ha. But thank you for the information.” Outcomes After the project, people in Papua are more aware of EITI Indonesia and its importance in improving extractive resources governance in Papua. The communication strategy has managed to reach audiences from various backgrounds such us indigenous people, communities, CSOs, students and local government. This effort has increased their awareness of extractive industries’ revenue issues, particularly in the context of Papua. News Cafe Discussion Geographical spread of the SMS Gateway facility
  5. 5. Challenges & Lessons Learned Some challenges and lesson learned from the project are: 1. The lack of capacity from the implementing partner on understanding the extractive industries governance and especially on revenue flows from the oil, gas and mining sectors. 2. The low awareness and capacity of audience/stakeholder such us local government, CSOs and communities on understanding the extractive industries flow revenue 3. The gap between urban and rural areas. Recommendations Some recommendations are: 1. The EITI Indonesia report needs to be more users friendly and easier to understand by communities and the average public. 2. Capacity building is needed for journalists to understand the EITI Report and extractive industries governance generally, especially journalists in Papua.

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Indonesia has announced its commitment to implement EITI (Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative) through the release of Presidential Regulation 26/2010. EITI is a global standard where Companies and Government report their payments and receipts of extractive industry revenues, to be reconciled through multi-stakeholder working groups. Indonesia has, or will shortly, produce reconciliation reports covering the 2009, 2010, and 2011 fiscal (and calendar) years. Papua is one of Indonesia’s richest natural resource regions, with mining, oil and gas operations as well as forestry and fisheries. Papua and West Papua provinces are both special autonomy regions which receive extra-high portion of oil and gas revenue sharing known in Indonesian as Dana Bagi Hasil (DBH), compared to other provinces in Indonesia. These revenue sharing funds are supposed to flow to both provincial and district governments. To make the EITI Indonesia report more relevant to local audience in Papua, AJI (Aliansi Jurnalis Independen) conduct a project that aims to create communications products in order to familiarize local audiences in Papua with EITI Indonesia report findings and other information about the extractive industries relevant for Papuans. AJI Papua collaborates with Publish What You Pay Indonesia, with support from Multi Donor Trust Fund (MDTF) administered by the World Bank.

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