Stanly County 4-H Favorite Food Show 2011                            Leaders/Parents/Members GuidePurpose:To encourage fam...
On the day of the show you will only need to serve/display the recipe you have prepared from home, not your entiremenu. Ho...
participants can manage confidently and is age appropriate. Entries set-up with parental assistance or supervision willnot...
   Participant: $8.00•   Seniors (14-18 years old):                1st Place: $20.00                2nd Place: $18.00  ...
Only place what is required for your meal. ie: If you are not having a salad, do NOT include a salad fork or a saladplate;...
SAMPLE FAVORITE FOOD SHOW IDEASNote that not every display needs to be “formal”. Below are ideas for several Food Review d...
THINGS TO THINKABOUT1. COLOR – pleasing colorin meals stimulates theappetite and makes eatinga greater pleasure.2. FLAVOR ...
Possible Judging Questions                   (Just some sample questions to get you thinking!)                            ...
Special thanks to the work and effort of Stanly                                    County4-H Volunteer Renee VanHornOther ...
2011 fav.food show info packet
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2011 fav.food show info packet

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Details and information about the 2011 Stanly County 4-H Favorite Food Show

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2011 fav.food show info packet

  1. 1. Stanly County 4-H Favorite Food Show 2011 Leaders/Parents/Members GuidePurpose:To encourage families to work together to seek the latest information on food and food preparation, nutrition,fitness, food and kitchen safety, consumer skills, and making choices that will lead to a healthier lifestyleMEMBER OBJECTIVES 1. To increase knowledge in making healthier food choices based on the USDA Food Pyramid and then incorporate these suggestions into their daily lives. 2. To gain experience in planning, preparing and serving food as part of a meal or snack. 3. To publicly demonstrate what they have learned.You must then register your recipe with the 4-H office no later than January 21, 2010. The recipe you register must bethe recipe you prepare for the food show. You do not have to submit your menu at the time of registration, but pleasesubmit a copy of your menu the day of the show to be displayed with your recipe in the 2011 Favorite Food ShowCookbook.To register you may do so by one of these methods: • On-line by going to http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2011_Fav_Food_Show_Registration . • By completing the registration form (attached) and emailing it back to the 4-H office. • By printing and completing a paper copy of the form and mailing it to the 4-H office.If you prefer to have a form mailed to you please contact the 4-H office.Preparing Your Favorite Food Entry:All food entries will be prepared at home prior to setting up at the favorite food show. It is suggested that the participantpractice by preparing the recipe at home prior to the event so they will be familiar with their recipe in advance. Practicemakes perfect!All food will be prepared at home on the day of the event and transported to the show. No food will be prepared at theAgri-Civic Center.Choosing Your Recipe:There are no specific food categories set for the different age groups. These are only recipe suggestions. Ideally, chooserecipes that are age appropriate.Select a tested, favorite recipe from a cookbook, or other dependable source. It can be a family favorite that you haveprepared before or you can test your skills and try a new recipe! Then based on suggestions made in the USDA FoodPyramid, plan a menu that would compliment your recipe. (Cloverbuds are NOT required to prepare a menu.) Helpfulresources include www.Mypyramid.gov and www.nutrition.gov.
  2. 2. On the day of the show you will only need to serve/display the recipe you have prepared from home, not your entiremenu. However, you will need to set your table however based on your entire menu. (For example, if you have soup onyour menu, you will need to include a table service that includes soup and spoon.) • Cloverbuds (Ages 5-8) should select any easy food item that they are able to prepare by themselves or with a little help from parents or older siblings. (Snacks and finger foods are great ideas!) • Juniors Level 1 (Ages 9-10) select items like their favorite nutritious food, beverage, snack or appetizer. The 4-Her should prepare their final product with only minimal parental supervision. • Junior Level 2 (Ages 11-13) select items like a nutritious salad, soup, sandwich, yeast bread, vegetable or dairy food. The 4-Her should prepare their final product with only minimal parental supervision. • Seniors (Ages 14-18) select items like a favorite nutritious main dish, meat, poultry, seafood, microwavable food, ethnic food, low calorie food item or dairy product. Although parental help is recommended to teach participants new skills when practicing their recipe in advance; however, no parental assistance will be allowed in the preparation of the final product. Entries made with parental supervision will not be eligible for judging placement. If the recipe is too expensive to practice multiple times in advance or without adult assistance, please choose a different recipe.Setting Up Your Display:Display your menu on the left hand side of your place setting and your recipe on the right. (Cloverbuds are not required tohave a menu.)They can stand alone, be framed or placed on the table beside your place setting.A proper place setting is required and should accommodate the food items in your menu. Each participant will be givenapproximately a 3’x3’ space. You can be creative as you desire but it is recommended to use things from your home toplay up your theme.Cloverbuds may receive assistance from an adult if needed. However, to build independence and to gain mastery ofskills learned, it is recommended that they prepare something that is simple that would build their confidence by doing itall their selves.Junior and Senior participants must completely set-up their display without parental assistance. Practicing with parentalhelp at home will prepare them to do this for themselves on the day of the event. Again, choose displays and themes
  3. 3. participants can manage confidently and is age appropriate. Entries set-up with parental assistance or supervision willnot be eligible for judging placement. If the display or setting is too complicated to manage without adult assistance,please choose a different recipe. Keep it fun!On the Day of the Favorite Food Show:Set-Up will be between 12:45-1:30 pm. Sign in at the registration table and turn an extra copy of your menu (Juniors& Seniors) to be place in the Favorite Foods Cook book.When you arrive everyone in attendance is to sign the attendance sheet. Then, participants find your name tag and wear itfor the entire show. Your name will be on the back of the name tag and your contestant number will be on the front. Findyour number on the table of your age division (same number as your name tag) and set up your display. Please remember,only Cloverbuds can receive help from a parent when setting up. All Juniors and Seniors should be able to set up theirown displayJudging will begin promptly after set-up and all participants and parents should report to the kitchen toparticipate in various activities. Participants will be called out individually based on their participant number.When your number is called, you will be instructed where to wait until interviewed by the judges. (Please do not distractor interrupt others who are being judged at that time.) The majority of your score will be based upon the interview with the judge. Please be assured the judges interviews will just be age appropriate conversation based on their knowledge of preparing the recipe, meal planning and making healthier food choices. See “Possible Judges Questions” for sample questions.While score are being tabulated, everyone is welcome to view the food displays and taste everyone’s recipes at the tastingtable. (During the set-up time, if the remainder of your food needs to be served warm later during the tasting session,please cover it and place it in the oven in the kitchen until time for the tasting. If your dish needs to be kept refrigerated,please cover it and place in one of the commercial coolers behind the concession stand. Be aware, the temperature of thefood will not play a role in the judging process.Displays may be taken down once everyone has had an opportunity to view them and photos have been taken.4-H Scholarship Money and ribbons will be awarded as follows: • Cloverbuds: $8.00 for participation • Juniors 1 (9-10 years old)  1st Place: $20.00  2nd Place: $18.00  3rd Place: $15.00  Participant: $8.00 • Juniors 1 (9-10 years old)  1st Place: $20.00  2nd Place: $18.00  3rd Place: $15.00
  4. 4.  Participant: $8.00• Seniors (14-18 years old):  1st Place: $20.00  2nd Place: $18.00  3rd Place: $15.00  Participant: $8.00
  5. 5. Only place what is required for your meal. ie: If you are not having a salad, do NOT include a salad fork or a saladplate; if you are not having a dessert, do NOT include a dessert fork or dessert spoon; if your menu does not include atype of bread or roll, do NOT include a bread & butter plate.)
  6. 6. SAMPLE FAVORITE FOOD SHOW IDEASNote that not every display needs to be “formal”. Below are ideas for several Food Review displays.1. Birthday party theme Something you would serve as the entrée at the birthday party Balloons Paper plate and napkins Toys or presents as center piece2. Fishing theme Fish dish Fishing lures Fish bait bucket Fish tackle box Net3. Hunting theme Venison meal Camouflage textile print Deer or other model knick knack4. Ethnic food theme such as Chinese Theme around stir fry Chop sticks Fan Oriental dishes5. Magic show theme Top hat Stuffed rabbit6. Picnic theme Checkered table cloth Favorite picnic food Paper plates and plastic silverware7. Farm theme John Deere tractor memorabilia Hardy meat dish8. Harvest theme Red bandana napkins Vase with stalks wheat9. Bee theme Snack mix Yellow and black colors Pooh dish wear
  7. 7. THINGS TO THINKABOUT1. COLOR – pleasing colorin meals stimulates theappetite and makes eatinga greater pleasure.2. FLAVOR – bland foodscompliment tangy foods –have contrast. Avoidhaving more than onestrong flavored foodwithin a meal (onions,turnips and rutabagas areexamples of foods with astrong flavor).3. TEXTURE – this meansthe crispness, crunchiness,hardness, softness,smoothness or chewinessof a food. Meals aremonotonous when foodsare all smooth or all crisp.A contrast in texture is amust in a well plannedmenu.4. FORM – combine foodsof different sizes, shapesand proportions. The useof all small shapes in foodsbecomes unappetizing.5. TEMPERATURE – contrasts in a meal must be considered regardless of the weather. Always serve hotfood hot and cold foods cold.6. VARIETY – meals are most pleasing when a variety of foods are offered within the menu. Lunches anddinners offer the most opportunity forvariety. Good menu planning usually does not allow for repeating foods and flavors within a meal (examples:tomato juice, tomato salad, tomatosauce).
  8. 8. Possible Judging Questions (Just some sample questions to get you thinking!) Remember, questions will be age appropriate.1. How did you prepare this food? Where did you get the recipe? Have you changed the recipe and how? Who helped you in preparing this food?2. Why did you choose this food? How often have you prepared it?3. How does this food fit your ability and interests?4. What did you learn about making good decisions? As a result of this project, are you making better food choices?5. How have you applied the things you have learned in this project?6. What planning and organizing skills did you develop by doing this project? Does the food look good? Have good flavor? Have good texture? Have good color? Have good shape? Is it safe to eat?7. Why was this an important project for you to do?8. Does the food fit the menu? Does the menu have a variety of texture, flavor, color, temperature and nutrients? Will it look well with other foods on the menu?9. What nutrients does the food provide? What do these nutrients do in the body? What nutrients does the menu provide? Is the menu balanced so it includes all foods listed on the MyPyramid food guide? How could the menu be varied to provide more nutrients? To cut down on certain nutrients? To increase or decrease calories?10. How might you use some of these same skills in other areas of your life?11. Would it take a long time to prepare the menu? Why or why not? Is this menu easy to prepare? Why or why not? What skills are needed? How could this menu be varied so it would take less time to prepare? Cost less? Be easier?12. Is the table setting attractive? Appropriate to the casualness or formality of the menu? Correctly arranged? Would this setting actually be used for the intended occasion?13. If someone helped or mentored you in this project, what would you tell them you learned from them?14. What did you learn from this project that you didn’t know before?15. What have you learned about yourself by doing this project?16. What role to the food choices you make and exercise (or the lack of it) make in your overall health?
  9. 9. Special thanks to the work and effort of Stanly County4-H Volunteer Renee VanHornOther Resources Available:4H-BU-07144 – Six Easy Pieces 4H-BU-07146 – Tasty Tid Bits 4H-BU-07148 – You’re the Chef 4H-BU-07150 – Foodworks 4H-FO-06629 – 4-H Food Presentations 4H-BU-06930 – Sports Nutrition Member Guide 4H-BU-08087 – Bags of Tricks, Level I 4H-BU-08088 – Micro Magicians, Level II 4H-BU-08089 – Amazing Rays, Level III Presto Meals, Level IV Foods PLUS Sheet USDA MyPyramid Internet Magazines AcknowledgementsFood Review Leaders Packet was written by Kimberly Asche, Associate Professor,University of Minnesota Extension Service, Regional Health and NutritionEducator. Curriculum reviewed by a team of University of Minnesota ExtensionService, Regional 4-H Educators, which included Shirley Doering, BarbaraSorensen and Donna Geiser. Pilot 4-H Food Review leaders and membersprograms were held in Kandiyohi and McLeod Counties. Hutchinson regionalsupport staff involved with layout and design included Kathy Eckwright, JanelZimmerman and Pam Herrmann. Portions of this curriculum were developed inearly 1990s by 4-H and Family Consumer Science educators in McLeod andKandiyohi counties. Food Safety activity pieces where a part of the Clay CountySummer Survivor curriculum developed and used in 2003 by Clay Countyeducators and staff. • Revised by the 4-H Favorite Food Show Committee of Stanly County, NC, 2010.Copyright © 2005, Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.The University of Minnesota is committed to the policy that all persons shall have equal access to its programs,facilities, and employment without regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status,disability, public assistance status, veteran status, or sexual orientation.

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