Three Keys to Accelerating Enterprise Collaboration

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With document-based content doubling in volume annually and in the face of increasing regulatory requirements, it’s more important than ever for content creation and approval to be fast and accurate. Many organizations are finding that their existing approach to creating and reviewing business content is breaking under the pressure, especially for large or complex documents and when diverse teams of authors, subject matter experts, and approval authorities are involved in the process. In short, e-mail, Word, and PDF simply aren’t enough. View this webinar to discover three keys to accelerating authoring, review, and approval with topic-oriented collaboration – a best practice that assure timely, accurate, and authentic documents that meet the demands of your business.

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Three Keys to Accelerating Enterprise Collaboration

  1. 1. Three Keys to Accelerating Document Collaboration, Review, and Approval Paul Wlodarczyk VP, Solutions and Services May 22, 2007
  2. 2. <ul><li>Insert Facts from Gartner / Forrester about increasing volume of unstructured content – doubling year over year </li></ul>Issue: Document Volumes Increasing
  3. 3. <ul><li>Poll: Which of these document types do you create collaboratively? </li></ul><ul><li>Regulatory filings </li></ul><ul><li>Policies / procedures </li></ul><ul><li>Proposals / Statements of work </li></ul><ul><li>Contracts </li></ul><ul><li>Requirements / specifications </li></ul><ul><li>Advisories / alerts </li></ul><ul><li>Technical Publications </li></ul><ul><li>Datasheets </li></ul>Collaborative Authoring and Review
  4. 4. <ul><li>Coordinate / assembling input from multiple authors </li></ul><ul><li>Coordinate comments / revisions from multiple reviewers </li></ul><ul><li>Re-use pre-approved content </li></ul><ul><li>Lock-down “master” contact </li></ul><ul><li>Straight-through processing (STP) vs. exception workflow </li></ul><ul><li>Audit trail – who changed it, who approved it, who read it, etc. </li></ul>Requirements for Collaborative Authoring and Review
  5. 5. <ul><li>Authoring and Review: </li></ul><ul><li>Word processing with track changes </li></ul><ul><li>Acrobat Reader with comments </li></ul><ul><li>E-mail for workflow, routing, notification </li></ul><ul><li>Some database-centered collaboration (e.g. requirements management) </li></ul>Common Approaches to Collaboration Technology
  6. 6. <ul><li>Content Reuse: </li></ul><ul><li>Copy / paste </li></ul><ul><li>Templates for common content (boilerplate) </li></ul><ul><li>Password protecting template content </li></ul><ul><li>Some integration of MS Word with Databases (e.g. requirements management, proposal management) </li></ul><ul><li>More often: Document control for finished works (but not for source content) </li></ul>Common Approaches to Collaboration Technology
  7. 7. Example 1: Proposal Response <ul><li>Proposals are perhaps the most common example of collaborative authoring and review. Today most proposals are created and managed as single documents that are created and reviewed in an iterative process. </li></ul>Response Manager Integrates SME responses into a single Proposal document 1 Response Team Receives RFP Response Manager Sends RFP to various experts for authoring portions of the response Subject Matter Experts Craft their portions of the response. Content reused through Copy / Paste, or re-written. 2 4 3 5 Response Manager Sends Proposal out for Review and Approval Reviewers / Approval Authorities Comment or Sign-off. Several iterations required for sign-off 6 Response Manager Coordinates feedback from reviewers, maintains master Proposal document 7 8 Response Manager Sends Proposal to Prospective Customer
  8. 8. Example 2: Datasheets <ul><li>Datasheets contain a combination of marketing and technical information, such as specifications, schematic drawings, and logic diagrams. Oftne these are copied / pasted from other documents. </li></ul>Tech Pubs Editor Reviews Format, Style, Grammar Publish to Web, CD, Print Archive Engineering Drawings / CAD Design Specifications Marketing Input Product Manager Reviews Technical Accuracy Application Engineer Creates Datasheet by copying / pasting from Engineering Artifacts Document Control Archives Approved Datasheet 1 2 3 4 5 Product Development Tech Pubs Doc Control Publishing
  9. 9. Example 3: Policy Authoring <ul><li>Policies are challenging because almost all authoring is in the form of a revision. Publishing updates is a challenge because of obsolete hardcopy in distribution. </li></ul>1 Policy Manager Receives policy change request Policy Manager Copies latest text from system of record and sends change to policy analyst Policy Analyst Makes draft changes, sends to Legal and HR for Review 2 3 Legal HR Legal and HR Wrangle content changes, reach agreement on final content 4 Policy Analyst Submits approved changes to publishing team 5 Publish updated manual to Web, CD, Print 6 Publishing Publishing Specialist Copies change to update master document in desktop publishing system HR reviews and approves / rejects changes to master documents 7 8 Managers and Employees refer to updated policies and procedures (hopefully…). 9 Policies
  10. 10. <ul><li>Can’t be tracked or controlled </li></ul><ul><li>Can’t reuse document components </li></ul><ul><li>Copy / Paste introduces version control issues </li></ul><ul><li>Implementing “virtual” or “compound documents” in office applications or desktop publishing requires complex approaches (e.g. burst / merge) </li></ul><ul><li>No good solution for conditional text, so it is performed manually </li></ul><ul><li>Can’t produce an audit trail (who changed, approved, read, etc.) </li></ul>Quality Limitations of “Whole Document” C o l l a b o r a t i o n
  11. 11. <ul><li>Slow and variable </li></ul><ul><li>Can’t process in parallel </li></ul><ul><li>Extra time used because content that already exists is rewritten </li></ul><ul><li>Extra time spend re-formatting information from one system to use in another </li></ul><ul><li>Reviewing whole documents takes longer than just new / changed content </li></ul>Cycle Time Limitations of “whole document” Collaboration
  12. 12. <ul><li>Wasteful </li></ul><ul><li>Extra effort spent on reviewing / editing / localizing previously processed content, not just the changes </li></ul><ul><li>Significant time spent on formatting – can be substantial </li></ul>Costs of “whole document” Collaboration
  13. 13. <ul><li>Leverage XML to make content current, authentic, and agile – to move into different formats as required </li></ul><ul><li>Review and manage content objects (e.g. topics) , not finished documents </li></ul><ul><li>Use workflow and content management to lock-down master content, and to make the approval process manageable – and measurable </li></ul>3 Keys to Accelerating Collaboration
  14. 14. Example 1: Proposal Response <ul><li>Topic-oriented content management and workflow make all the difference. </li></ul>Response Manager Assembles master Proposal Document by reference to SME topics 1 Response Team Receives RFP Response Manager Sends RFP sections to various experts for authoring portions of the response Subject Matter Experts Craft their portions of the response as XML topics. Content reused through content management. SME responses stored in CMS for future reuse. 2 4 3 Response Manager Sends Proposal Topics for Review and Approval as they are completed Reviewers / Approval Authorities Comment or Sign-off on the topics they are responsible for. Several iterations may be required for sign-off. 6 Response Manager Monitors progress through workflow. Notified when final topic is approved – then proposal is complete. 7 8 Response Manager Sends Proposal to Prospective Customer Content Management Workflow Workflow 5
  15. 15. Example 2: Datasheets <ul><li>Real-time generation of accurate datasheets requires workflow and content management. XML content reuse and rendering eliminates manual steps that introduce errors, cost, and cycle time. </li></ul>Content Management Product Manager Reviews / Approves content changes Application Engineer assembles datasheet with references to validated engineering content Demand Publish CD, Print from Latest PDF 1 2 Tech Pubs Editor Reviews changes for style, Releases for Publishing 3 5a Workflow Engineering Data 4 Automated publishing tools format / transform approved XML and art into web pages, PDF Push new content to Web 5b Product Development Tech Pubs Publishing XML Publishing Specifications Marketing Input As content topics are created / approved, they are stored in the CMS. Some content is referenced from other enterprise systems. Drawings / models
  16. 16. Example 3: Policies <ul><li>Topic-oriented collaboration and publishing combined with electronic distribution enables 100% assurance of latest policy information and provides a mechanism for tracking compliance. </li></ul>1 Policy Analyst, HR and Legal Collaborate through workflow on the revision. A complete audit trail is maintained of changes. Approval is to content, not documents 2 Workflow Triggers a publishing process once the final approval is entered in the system Content Management Workflow 3 Policy Manager receives policy change request, Initiates a policy revision workflow with Legal, HR, and a Policy Analyst Legal HR Analyst Automated publishing tools format / transform approved XML into web pages, PDF XML Publishing Auto-publish latest manual content to Web. CD and Print versions are updated periodically, but only if required. 4 Managers and Employees refer to updated policies and procedures on the web site. Hardcopy updates are minimized and only maintained as necessary. Workflow systems can track Read / Update Notification Acknowledgements for Compliance Tracking. 5 Workflow
  17. 17. <ul><li>The powerful combination of: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>XML authoring and publishing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Topic-oriented authoring and reviewing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>XML Content Management and workflow </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Can: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>improve cycle time, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>reduce costs, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>and improve quality </li></ul></ul><ul><li>for collaborative authoring and review. It can also make the process manageable and measurable – critical for compliance applications. </li></ul>Recap: Benefits of Topic Oriented Collaboration
  18. 18. <ul><li>Collaboration Audit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Review existing Process, Content, People, and Technology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Redesign the process to be optimal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Leverage topic-oriented content </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Remove rework and redundant activities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Automate formatting tasks </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Automate routing and notification tasks </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Determine best-fit for collaboration technologies given the existing process, content, and people. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Document the ROI. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organize for change. </li></ul></ul>How can I get started?
  19. 19. What collaboration technologies can JustSystems provide? <ul><ul><li>XMetaL Enterprise Solutions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Topic oriented authoring (XMetaL) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Topic-oriented content contribution (XMAX) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Topic-oriented review (XMAX and custom solutions) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Content management and workflow integration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>XFY Enterprise Edition 1.5 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Content integration for XML content, XML databases, and web services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enterprise mash-ups </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Custom solutions for integrating content into business processes </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Poll: Current Collaboration Projects <ul><li>“I am involved in a collaboration project this year that could benefit from a collaboration audit or collaboration technology.” </li></ul><ul><li>Based upon what I heard today, would consider a new project to change our approach to collaboration. </li></ul><ul><li>Currently planning a collaboration project. </li></ul><ul><li>Currently implementing a collaboration project. </li></ul><ul><li>No collaboration projects planned in the near future. </li></ul>

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