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English Poetry

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Figurative Language and Musical Devices

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English Poetry

  1. 1. FIGURATIVE LANGUAGES AND MUSICAL DEVICES ANALYSIS George Gordon Byron’s She Walks In Beauty By Putri Rachmawati
  2. 2. Biography of the Poet  Born George Gordon Noel Byron on January 22, 1788, Lord Byron was the sixth Baron Byron of a rapidly fading aristocratic family. In 1798, at age 10, George inherited the title of his great-uncle, William Byron, and was officially recognized as Lord Byron. His unrequited passion found expression in such poems as "Hills of Annesley" (written 1805), "The Adieu" (written 1807), "Stanzas to a Lady on Leaving England" (written 1809), and "The Dream" (written 1816). Lord Byron was one of the leading figures of the Romantic Movement in early 19th century England.
  3. 3. POEM : SHE WALKS IN BEAUTY She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all of that’s best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes: Thus mellow’d to that tender light Which heaven to gaudy day denies. One shade the more, one ray the less, Had half impair’d the nameless grace Which waves in every raven trees, Or softly lightens o’er her face; Where thought serenaly sweet express How pure, how dear their dwelling-place. And on that cheek, and o’er that brow, So soft, so calm, yet eloquent, The smiles that win, the tint that glow, But tell of days in goodness spent, A mind at peace with all bellow, A heart whose love is innocent!
  4. 4. Figurative Language Simile : She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies Line 1 there are words “She walks in beauty, like the night”. They have meaning that “she” is beauty as the night. It is refer to the line 2, “Of cloudless climes and starry skies”, the night aim to the night without clouds and full of stars. So, these means the woman as beauty as the night with cloudless climes and starry skies.
  5. 5. Hyperbole : Thus mellow’d to that tender light Which heaven to gaudy day denies These line have hyperbolic meaning, because it means that the woman has beauty that softly emitted from herself, as if her light of beauty denied by heaven. One shade the more, one ray the less, Had half impair’d the nameless grace In the line 1 and 2 have hyperbolic meaning, because it means that if the goodness of her face has changed because of little badness, it could depraved the beauty of the woman and she become ‘half beauty’ or not perfect anymore.
  6. 6. Symbol : One shade the more, one ray the less Which waves in every raven trees, Beside hyperbolic meaning, in line 1 also has symbolic meaning. The word ‘shade’ in “One shade the more” means badness. And word ‘ray’ in “one ray the less” means goodness. For over all it means that a little badness decrease the goodness. The word ‘waves’ means the wavy hair and ‘raven trees’ means black hair. So line 3 means the woman who has wavy black hair. The smiles that win, the tint that glow In line 3 has symbolic meaning. The word ‘win’ in “The smiles that win” means attractive. And ‘the tint’ in “the tint that glow” means the color of her face. So over all it means, the smiles that smiling attractively and the color of her face that glowing beautifully.
  7. 7. MUSICAL DEVICES Rime : stanza 1 She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all of that’s best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes: Thus mellow’d to that tender light Which heaven to gaudy day denies. In stanza 1, there are words night, bright, and light which have repetition of the vowel sound as well as the words skies, eyes, and denies. It is called rime a-b-a-b-a-b or called end rime, because it comes at the end of the line. First similarity are night, bright, and light thats called rime a. Second are skies, eyes, and denies which called rime b.
  8. 8. Stanza 2 One shade the more, one ray the less, Had half impair’d the nameless grace Which waves in every raven trees, Or softly lightens o’er her face; Where thought serenaly sweet express How pure, how dear their dwelling-place. Stanza 3 And on that cheek, and o’er that brow, So soft, so calm, yet eloquent, The smiles that win, the tint that glow, But tell of days in goodness spent, A mind at peace with all bellow, A heart whose love is innocent!
  9. 9. The similarity also exist on stanza 2 and 3. As well as stanza 1, stanza 2 and stanza 3 also have a-b-a-b-a-b at the end of the rime. These similarities showing that Byron chooses his word for sound as a mean of reinforcing his meaning, besides in terms of aesthetics too.
  10. 10. CONCLUSION She Walks In Beauty by George Gordon Byron is poem about a woman. She Walks In Beauty tells about the beauty side of the woman. As for literary element, George Gordon Byron uses some kind of figurative language and musical devices. He uses simile to showing how beauty the woman like the night that clearly sky and full of star. He put hyperbolic sense to convincing the reader that the woman is perfect. Byron use symbolic sense in word shade, it is not talking about shelter but the badness. Byron also pay attention in term of aesthetics, he chooses his word for sound as a mean of reinforcing his meaning through rime on every end of line.

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