Renewable Energy in India: Status and Future Prospects

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Renewable Energy in India: Status and Future Prospects

By:
Pushkar Shanker
Dept. of Electrical Engineering
Guru Nanak Dev Engineering College

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  • Renewable Energy in India: Status and Future Prospects

    1. 1. Renewable Energy in India: Status and Future Prospects “……the time is running out…soon, there will be nothing left to burn on earth but earth itself…” By: Pushkar Shanker Dept. of Electrical Engineering Guru Nanak Dev Engineering College
    2. 2. ENERGY IN INDIA: AN  OVERVIEW  India consumes 3.7% of the world’s commercial  energy making it the 5th largest consumer of  energy globally.  Total installed capacity of 1,44,912 MW.  350 kgoe per capita primary commercial energy  consumption. 22% of world average.  Per capita electricity consumption: 600 kWhr per  year.  About 80% of total rural energy consumption  comes from non­commercial energy.  84% villages electrified. 44% of rural households  electrified.
    3. 3. INDIAN POWER SECTOR Source: Ministry of New and Renewable Energy
    4. 4. ENERGY CONSUMPTION  TREND
    5. 5. ENERGY SCENARIO IN INDIA  Rapid economic development & Increasing  population = High demand for Energy  A sustained 8% GDP growth of India requires an  annual increase of:  a) Commercial energy supply from 3.7% to 6.1%  b) Total primary energy supply from 2.2% to 5.1%  Limited supply of COAL, coupled with its poor  quality, low level of technologies advancements  and high environmental hazards.  Limited domestic reserves and uncertain foreign  supply of hydrocarbons.
    6. 6. WHY RENEWABLE ENERGY FOR  INDIA?  Power shortage  Rising Prices of Oils & Gases  Ecological Hazards  Ample resources and sites available  Abundant sunshine  Government incentive  Increased financing options
    7. 7. BENEFITS OF RENEWABLE  ENERGY  Avoid the high costs involved in transmission  capex.  Avoid distribution losses – Technical & otherwise  Avoid recurring fuel cost  Boost the rural economy  Encourage self help groups & self dependence  Enable village co­operatives to supply and / or  monitor distribution  Make available much needed energy for basic  needs at the doorstep at affordable prices.
    8. 8. INSTALLED CAPACITY FROM  RENEWABLE ENERGY Source: Ministry of New and Renewable Energy
    9. 9. CURRENT FOCUS  Promoting rural energy for productive uses and  linked social benefits  Promoting renewable energy for rural  electrification and industrial applications  Enhancing access of the rural poor to affordable  and sustainable energy services  Supporting training and capacity building for  manufacture, local assembly and maintenance of  renewable energy technologies / systems  Organizing global forum activities and providing  strategic expert advice on renewable energy  technologies and energy policy planning and  institutional framework
    10. 10. DEPLOYMENT Wind installation (global)  60,000 MW (cumulative) India’s share (and position)  6270 MW(fourth in the  world) SPV cell production (global)  1,700 MW (in 2005) India’s share (and position) 37 MW (seventh in the  world) Biogas plants (global)  16 million units  (cumulative) India’s share (and position)  3.9 million family size  units (second in the world) Solar Thermal (global)  110 million sq.m  (cumulative) India’s share (and position)  1.65 million sq. m (ninth  in the world) Source: Ministry of New and Renewable Energy
    11. 11. POTENTIAL Renewable Estimate Remarks Resource d Wind Power Potentia 45,000 MW Sites with wind densities of 300 W/ l m2 or higher with 9% of assessed  area available for wind farms  requiring 12 ha/MW. Biomass Power 45,000 MW 20 mha of wastelands yielding 10  MT/ha/annum of woody biomass  giving 4000 kcal/ kg with system  efficiency of 30% and operating at  75% PLF. Solar Power 50,000 MW Assuming solar energy: 4­6 kWhr/ m2/ day and depending  upon future developments making  solar technology cost­competitive  for grid power applications. Small Hydro  15,000 MW Power Bio­Energy 24,000 MW Source: Ministry of New and Renewable Energy
    12. 12. COMMERCIAL ENERGY  IMPORTS FOR 8% GDP Fuel Range of Assumed Range Import Requireme Domestic of (Percen nt in Productio Import t) Scenarios n s Oil (Mt) 350–486 35 315–451 90–93 Natural Gas 100–197 100 0-97 0-49 (Mtoe) Coal (Mtoe) 632-1022 560 72-462 11-45 Total 1351-1702 ---- 387-1,010 29-59 Commercial Primary Energy Source: Energy Policy Report, Planning Commission, India
    13. 13. INDIA – AN ATTRACTIVE  RENEWABLE ENERGY  MARKET  India has a large potential for energy generation  by utilization of renewable energy source  MNRE has planed a target capacity addition of  10,000 MW during the 11th five year plan  10% of annual power capacity additions to be from  Renewable between 2003­2012  As per the E&Y’s renewable energy index, which  takes into account various factors governing  renewable energy growth in a country, India is  ranked 3rd overall.  High potential for development across various  renewable source
    14. 14. INDIAN WIND ENERGY  SECTOR OVERVIEW CURRENT SCENARIO  4th largest producers of wind energy in the world.  India’s current installed wind capacity is 8.7 GW  (approx. 10% of the world’s total installed  capacity).  Capacity growth has been strong with a 22%  CAGR over last decade.  Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra & Karnataka are the  leaders in wind capacity.
    15. 15. INDIAN WIND ENERGY  SECTOR OVERVIEW FUTURE POTENTIAL  Cumulative installed capacity is expected to reach 12  GW by 2010.  Generation based subsidy of Rs 0.50per unit recently  announced for 10 years (limit of 5 MW per developer  and 50 MW in aggregate).
    16. 16. KEY TREND IN INDIA WIND  ENERGY INDUSTRY  All players in India undertaking a Dual Role –  Manufacturing & Developer  Various Indian Companies are looking to enter  the sector  Infrastructure Developers  Electrical Equipment Manufacturers
    17. 17. INDIAN SOLAR ENERGY  MARKET OVERVIEW MASSIVE POTENTIAL OF INDIA  Huge potential for Solar Energy development in India  High sunshine days, abundance of sites make soalr  energy an enticing prospect MARKET IN GROWTH STAGE  Installed manufacturing capacity has grown from a  meager 10 MW in 2000 to a total of 335 MW by 2007.  India is now 7th worldwide in Solar PV Cell  production  Generation capacities expected to pick up with  generation linked subsidy announced by government
    18. 18. KEY TRENDS IN INDIAN  SOLAR INDUSTRY EXPANSION ACROSS THE BOARD  Various existing players planning Brownfield  expansion.  Huge new Greenfield facilities being planned. KEY DRIVERS INCLUDE:  Low operating costs  Capital subsidy (20/25%) by government for large  semi­conductor based units (for large investments  above certain limits)  Possibility of Solar Energy development locally.  Public and private capital in abundant supply.
    19. 19. INDIAN HYDRO POWER  SECTOR OVERVIEW POTENTIAL FOR HYDRO POWER GENERATION  India ranks 8th in terms of hydro­electricity generated  Potential to provide energy in remote and hilly areas  where extension of an electrical transmission grid  system is uneconomical  Till now, 14 States have announced policies for setting  up commercial SHP projects. KEY POSITIVE  Proven Technology  Low O&M Costs  High energy conversion efficiency (70%)
    20. 20. INDIAN HYDRO POWER  SECTOR OVERVIEW KEY DRAWBACKS  High gestation period  High capital costs (per MW)  Social Costs FUTURE POTENTIAL  Hydro capacity expected to reach 57 GW by 2012.  Small hydro potential is expected close to 15 GW.  MNRE has introduced subsidy schemes for SHPs up  to 25 MW.  Well­established manufacturing base for full range  and type of small hydro equipments.
    21. 21. BIOMASS ENERGY OVERVIEW
    22. 22. OVERVIEW CHALLENGES POTENTIAL DRIVERS  Small sized  20 GW of power   Agro based  may be generated  economy  Dependence on  from 300 MT of   Large,  agricultural output agro waste  Unexploited   Insecure raw  (currently  domestic resource material linkage produced)  Favorably aligned   Shortage of   50% currently  regulatory  equipment burnt in the open environment  Lack of cheap   Less than 3%   Simple  financing, both debt  potential realized technology & equity  Can revolutionize   Power deficit  pace of rural  across states  Currently, few  electrification. focused biomass  players
    23. 23. RETURNS IN RE BASE  GENERATION PROJECTS  Given the comparatively higher cost of  generating energy from renewable sources,  necessity for financial support for the industry.  Government has introduced subsidies to make  returns attractive for developers.  Indicative expected returns: Type of  Wind Hydro  Hydro  Biomass Solar Project Returns (PPA) (Merchant) Costs (Rs. Cr/MW) 5­6 5­6 5­6 4­5 18­20 Equity IRR 20­25 15­18 20­25 16­20 ­­
    24. 24. THANK YOU By: Pushkar Shanker Department of Electrical Engineering Guru Nanak Dev Engineering College Gill Park, Ludhiana.

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