Motivating the Workforce

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  • See Learning Goal 1: Explain Taylor’s scientific management.
    Intrinsic means from within; when you have a drive to succeed and are motivated by purpose, passion, and mission.
  • See Learning Goal 1: Explain Taylor’s scientific management.
    Intrinsic means from within; when you have a drive to succeed and are motivated by purpose, passion, and mission.
  • See Learning Goal 1: Explain Taylor’s scientific management.
    Intrinsic means from within; when you have a drive to succeed and are motivated by purpose, passion, and mission.
  • See Learning Goal 1: Explain Taylor’s scientific management.
    Intrinsic means from within; when you have a drive to succeed and are motivated by purpose, passion, and mission.
  • See Learning Goal 1: Explain Taylor’s scientific management.
    Intrinsic means from within; when you have a drive to succeed and are motivated by purpose, passion, and mission.
  • See Learning Goal 1: Explain Taylor’s scientific management.
    Extrinsic rewards are often temporary and driven by money, recognition and results.
  • See Learning Goal 1: Explain Taylor’s scientific management.
  • See Learning Goal 2: Describe the Hawthorne studies and their significance to management.
    The Hawthorne studies were conducted in Cicero, Illinois at the Western Electric plant over a six year period.
  • See Learning Goal 2: Describe the Hawthorne studies and their significance to management.
    The Hawthorne studies were conducted in Cicero, Illinois at the Western Electric plant over a six year period.
  • See Learning Goal 3: Identify the levels of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and apply them to employee motivation.
  • See Learning Goal 3: Identify the levels of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and apply them to employee motivation.
    Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
    This slide reproduces the illustration of Maslow’s Hierarchy from the chapter.
    Most people in the class, especially those that have taken basic psychology, may be familiar with Maslow and the premise of human needs hierarchy.
    Use this opportunity to relate Maslow’s need theory to the work environment:
    Workers require competitive salaries, benefits and clean work environments.
    Employees have the need for security against termination in their jobs and the feeling of being safe against bodily harm while performing their job functions.
    On the job, workers have the need to feel a part of a successful group, driven by achievement.
    Employees seek opportunities for advancement, empowerment, recognition, and responsibility through additional work-related performance. Companies must attempt to satisfy these needs through opportunities within the organization.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s article in the Harvard Business Review, “One More Time: How Do You Motivate Employees?” is a classic and explores his idea of job content in depth.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Comparison of the Theories of Maslow and Herzberg
    This slide gives students a good starting point to see the relationship between Maslow and Herzberg.
    To start a discussion ask students if they are motivated by money? This question always starts a discussion with most students stating that money is a real motivating factor. Follow-up this discussion with the following: If you dislike your current job and your boss offers you more money will it change your feelings about your job in the long run?
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 2: Describe the Hawthorne studies and their significance to management.
    The Hawthorne studies were conducted in Cicero, Illinois at the Western Electric plant over a six year period.
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • See Learning Goal 4: Distinguish between the motivators and hygiene factors identified by Herzberg.
    Herzberg’s Theory
    This slide illustrates another “need” theory regarding workers and their job needs.
    This theory is based on what an organization can do to fulfill the individual needs of workers while motivating them to excel.
    The key component of Herzberg’s work was the opposite of “satisfaction” is “no satisfaction.” If the basic hygiene factors were not in place, a worker is not satisfied. To have a satisfied, motivated workforce, a company needs to provide the following:
    Achievement
    Recognition
    Work Itself
    Responsibility
    Advancement
    Growth
  • Motivating the Workforce

    1. 1. * Chapter Nine * Introduction to Business Dr. Herris Simandjuntak, SE, MM Presented by Cut Fitri Handayani Markus Tanuwijaya Purwedi Darminto
    2. 2. Employee Motivation * Question ? * What are motivated us to go to work? 9-2
    3. 3. Top 7 Factors that Motivate Employees * The Answer ! Source : http://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/print-edition/2010/12/03/top-7-factors-that-motivate-employees.html * 9-3
    4. 4. Life at Google * Video * 9-4
    5. 5. * SERGEY BRIN & LARRY PAGE Profile Google * • Founded Google in 1998 in a friend’s garage. • Their success is a result of constant innovation and motivating employees to pursue their own interests. • Walls are painted in bright colors, offices are open and the Googleplex provides food and recreation activities for all employees. 9-5
    6. 6. Human Relations *Nature of Human Relations * The study of the behavior of individuals and groups in organizational settings. 9-6
    7. 7. The Nature of HR *Nature of Human Relations * • Motivation  The inner drive that directs a person’s behavior toward goals. • Morale  An employee’s attitude toward his or her job, employer, and colleagues. 9-7
    8. 8. *Nature of The Motivation Process Human Relations * Need More money for unexpected medical expenses Goal-directed behavior Ask for a raise Work harder to gain a promotion Look for a higher-paying job Steal Need Satisfaction More money 9-8
    9. 9. * Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Rewards Nature of Human Relations * Extrinsic = Outside Recognition Promotions Gifts Intrinsic = Inside Praise Feeling of Job Well Done Pride Sense of Achievement 9-9
    10. 10. INTRINSIC REWARDS *Nature of Human Relations * Intrinsic Rewards -- Personal satisfaction and enjoyment felt after attaining a goal. Kinds of Intrinsic Rewards: -Pride in your performance -Sense of achievement 9-10
    11. 11. EXTRINSIC REWARDS *Nature of Human Relations * Extrinsic Rewards – Benefits and/or recognition received from someone else. Kinds of Extrinsic Rewards: - Pay Raises - Promotions - Awards 9-11
    12. 12. Historical Perspectives on Employee Motivation * Historical Perspectives * • Classical Theory of Motivation (Frederick W. Taylor) • The Hawthorne Studies (Elton Mayo) 9-12
    13. 13. CLASSICAL THEORY OF MOTIVATION * Frederick W. Taylor • Taylor suggested that workers who were paid more would produce more , an idea that would benefit both companies and workers. * • He also believed that incentives would motivate employees to be more productive • Classical Theory of Motivation – Theory suggesting that money is the sole motivator for workers. 9-13
    14. 14. HAWTHORNE STUDIES: PURPOSE AND RESULTS * Elton Mayo • Researchers studied worker efficiency under different levels of light. * • Productivity increased regardless of light condition. • Researchers decided it was a human or psychological factor at play. • Hawthorne Effect -- People act differently when they know they are being studied. 9-14
    15. 15. MASLOW’S THEORY of MOTIVATION * Theories of Employee Motivation * • Hierarchy of Needs -- Theory of motivation based on unmet human needs from basic physiological needs to safety, social and esteem needs to selfactualization needs. • Needs that have already been met do not motivate. • If a need is filled, another higher-level need emerges. 9-15
    16. 16. MASLOW’S HIERARCHY of NEEDS * Theories of Employee Motivation * 9-16
    17. 17. HERZBERG’S TWO-FACTOR THEORY * Theories of Employee Motivation * • Herzberg’s research centered on two questions: - What factors controlled by managers are most effective in increasing worker motivation? - How do workers rank jobrelated factors in order of importance related to motivation? 9-17
    18. 18. JOB CONTENT * Theories of Employee Motivation * • Herzberg found job content factors were most important to workers – workers like to feel they contribute to the company. • Motivational Factors -Job factors that cause employees to be productive and that give them satisfaction. Focus on the content of the work itself. 9-18
    19. 19. JOB ENVIRONMENT * Theories of Employee Motivation • Job environment factors maintained satisfaction but did not motivate employees. * • Hygiene Factors -- Job factors that can cause dissatisfaction if missing but that do not necessarily motivate employees if increased. Focus on the work setting and not the content of the work. 9-19
    20. 20. * HERZBERG’S MOTIVATIONAL and HYGIENE FACTORS Theories of Employee Motivation Motivational Factors Hygiene Factors Work itself Company policy and administration Achievement Recognition Responsibility Supervision Working conditions Interpersonal relations Growth and advancement * Salary, status and job security 9-20
    21. 21. * COMPARISON of the THEORIESTheories of Employee Motivation of MASLOW and HERZBERG * 9-21
    22. 22. * CASE STUDY 1 PT Astra Graphia Information Technology Case Study 1 : Motivating Agit Workforce * 9-22
    23. 23. * Case Study 1 : Motivating Agit Workforce * 9-23
    24. 24. * OBJECTIVE Case Study 1 : Motivating Agit Workforce – Benefit Allowwance * 9-24
    25. 25. * ALLOWANCE PACKAGES Case Study 1 : Motivating Agit Workforce – Benefit Allowwance * 9-25
    26. 26. * COMPETENCE LEVEL Case Study 1 : Motivating Agit Workforce – Benefit Allowwance * @specialization get IDR .xxMio / month – same for all Competence Level 9-26
    27. 27. * PROJECT INCENTIVE Case Study 1 : Motivating Agit Workforce – Benefit Allowwance * 9-27
    28. 28. * SKILL LEVEL - PATH Case Study 1 : Motivating Agit Workforce – Training Curricullum * 9-28
    29. 29. * SKILL LEVEL - DEFINITION Case Study 1 : Motivating Agit Workforce – Training Curricullum * 9-29
    30. 30. * TRAINING PATH - GENERAL Case Study 1 : Motivating Agit Workforce – Training Curricullum * 9-30
    31. 31. * GATHERING Case Study 1 : Motivating Agit Workforce – Gathering * 9-31
    32. 32. * SECTION GATHERING Case Study 1 AGIT – Gathering * 9-32
    33. 33. * DEPARTMENT GATHERING Case Study 1 AGIT – Gathering * 9-33
    34. 34. * Study PRESENTATION & PHOTO Case – 1 AGIT Gathering CONTEST * 9-34
    35. 35. McGregor contrasted two views of management the traditional view, which he called Theory X, and the humanistic view, which he called Theory Y. * MCGREGOR’S XY Theory * 9-35
    36. 36. Theory Z a management philosophy that stresses employee participation in all aspects of company decision making process. * Theory Z William G. Ouchi * 9-36
    37. 37. * Other Motivational Theories “Person receives rewards Proportional to the contribution he or she makes to the organization.” Equity Theory & Expectancy Theory * “Your motivation depends not only on how much you want something, but how likely you believe you are to get it.” 9-37
    38. 38. * Intra Company Transferee Case Study 2 : Motivation at TOYOTA * TOYOT A 9-38
    39. 39. TOYOTA Philosophy * Case Study 2 : Case: Motivation at Motivation at TOYOTA TOYOTA * 9-39
    40. 40. Key Point of Kaizen Activity * Case Study 2: Motivation at TOYOTA * HOW ? • Standardize the new, improve operation and Share best practice to others. • Measure the operation (tack time & cycle time) • Innovate to meet requirements and increase productivity • Continue cycle ad infinitum 9-40
    41. 41. * Intra Company Transferee Case Study 2 : Motivation at TOYOTA To enhanced people development through challenging assignment in global and regional level. TOYOTA develop on-the-job training program that temporarily transfers employees from Home Company to another affiliate to learn culture, and have broader Lina D. Siagian (HR ) networking as Key Person of the incoming project. Dispatched to: * As of May 1 2013, a total 451 transferees from 52 affiliates in 36 countries were working in different country to learn and grasp the best practice from Host Company, to smooth the process of Rudi Budiman (Engineering) Dispatched to: implementation in Home Company. TMC 2010 – 2013 TMC 2010 9-41
    42. 42. Intra Company Transferee * Case Study 2 : Case: Motivation at at TOYOTA * 9-42
    43. 43. What’s so important about Motivation? * Case Study 2 : Case: Motivation at TOYOTA - Stable employment - Employee engagement - Improve working condition Contribution towards Contribution towards Company Prosperity Company Prosperity Share Share Common Common Values Values * Improvement in Improvement in employees’ employees’ Standard of Living Standard of Living - Retained best talent - Achieve Company goals 9-43
    44. 44. STRATEGIES FOR MOTIVATING EMPLOYEES • Behavior Modification * Strategies for motivating employees * • Job Design 9-44
    45. 45. * JOB DESIGN STRATEGIES Job Rotation Strategies for motivating employees * Movement of employees from one job to another in an effort to relieve the boredom Job Enlargement The addition of more tasks to a job instead of treating each task as separate Job Enrichment Gives employees more tasks within job, and more control and authority 9-45
    46. 46. FLEXIBLE SCHEDULING STRATEGIES * Strategies for motivating employees • Flextime * • Compressed Work Week • Job Sharing • Telecommuting FAST FACT: 59% of companies with more than 5000 workers allow job-sharing. Source: Jim Owen, “In Pursuit of Job Sharing,” from http://usatoday.com/careers/features/feat009.htm (accessed June 8, 2001). 9-46
    47. 47. STRATEGIES FOR MOTIVATING EMPLOYEES * Strategies for motivating employees * Core Time Start Time End Time 9-47
    48. 48. * The importance of motivational strategies THE IMPORTANCE OF MOTIVATIONAL STRATEGIES • Fosters employee loyalty * • Boosts productivity • Affects all relationships within the organization • Influences promotion, pay, job design, training, and reporting relationships 9-48
    49. 49. * The importance of motivational strategies THE IMPORTANCE OF MOTIVATIONAL STRATEGIES * Source: “Office Team Survey : Work/Life Balance, Learning Opportunities Have Greatest Impact on Job Satisfaction.” PR Newswire, January 26,2012, www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/officeteam-survey-worklife-balance-learning-opportunities-have-greatest9-49 impact-on-job-satisfaction-138116108.html
    50. 50. INDOMOBIL PEOPLE DEVELOPMENT
    51. 51. * Motivating Employees Across the Globe LG8 * 10-51

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