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Encouraging  adult  English  
learners  to  help  children  
become  bilingual
Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner
Instructors,...
Workshop  outcomes
v Gain familiarity with asset-based
perspectives of bilingualism
v Recognize ways to promote bilingua...
Traditional  emphasis  
on  the  L2  English
v Adults have already developed skills in their
native language.
v Teachers...
Have  you  heard  of…
v apologies for native
language use?
v penalties for using
L1 during ESL class?
v lack of profici...
Impact  of  attitude  on  families
v How does a deficit-
based attitude affect
our students’
perspective on using
L1 in t...
L1:  asset  or  deficit?
Approached from a deficit perspective,
students who are English language learners
(ELL) are often...
Dual  language  learners
v Children who are Dual Language Learners (DLLs) acquire
two or more languages simultaneously, a...
How  can  ESL  teachers…
v let our students know that their L1 is an
asset?
v help our students show their children that...
Encourage  support  for  
bilingualism
v Give adult ESL learners
information about…
v importance of home
language
v lan...
Activity  1:  Reading  a  quote  
about  the  home  language
v Pre-reading
v Vocabulary
v Schema
v Read
v Discuss the...
Purposes  of  quote  activity
v Inform students of the
importance of the
home language.
v Develop vocabulary.
v Give ex...
Vocabulary  practice
1. ____ home language
2. ____ to support
3. ____ to maintain
4. ____ to be connected
to people
5. ___...
Pre-­‐reading  questions
1. What is your home language? What was your
grandparents’ home language?
1. Do you know any chil...
Quote  from  an  ECE*  expert
All children need English in order to thrive in
their new country. They also need support in...
Discussion  questions
1. What does this quote mean?
2. How can adults help children to maintain
their home language?
3. Ho...
Activity  2:  Listening  to  a  passage  about  
language  development    
v Pre-listening
v Develop schema.
v Listen a...
Purposes  of  listening  cloze
v To give information
about language
development.
v To hone listening,
vocabulary, and
di...
Pre-­‐listening  questions
1. What do parents and caregivers do to help
young children learn language?
2. What does ‘talka...
Listen  and  fill  in  the  blanks.
In talkative _______________ , children hear many
words every day. They hear stories a...
Listening  cloze,  contd.
_______________ children need to hear a lot
of words to help them develop their language
_______...
Check  comprehension.
Read the statements below. Mark them as T for
true or F for false based on the information above.
If...
Discuss  the  questions.
1. What happens when a child knows a lot of
words? What happens when a child
doesn’t?
2. Are you ...
Fast  facts
Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 23
v In a study of 42 parents and their babies,
Betty Hart and Todd Risley dis...
Activity  3:  Expanding  language
v Develop a strategy
for talking more
v Develop ability to
repeat and expand a
child’s...
Purposes  of  speaking  task
v To provide students
with a specific
strategy for using
more words
v To practice the
strat...
Rationale
One important way to help children
hear more language is by responding to a
child’s sounds and words. It is help...
Repetition  and  expansion
v Child: “Doggie eat.”
v Child: “Truck
broken.”
v Child: “More milk.”
v Adult: “Yes, the do...
Practice  repeating  -­‐ expanding
Read the child’s words below. These are 2-3 word phrases.
Repeat and expand these phras...
Expand  2-­‐3  word  utterances
with  a  partner
1. Cat outside!
2. Mommy hungry.
3. No school.
4. Ball right here
5. Have...
Activate  home  language
Children benefit from hearing lots of words, in any
language! They benefit from hearing many word...
Activity  4:  Bilingual  booklet
v Talk with children aged
3-15.
v Take dictation of what
younger children say.
v Help ...
Purposes  of  booklet  activity
v To demonstrate the value of
home language
v To provide the opportunity
to publish
v T...
Brems, M., Chan, M. and Rosner, J. (in press). English for Child Development:
Language Skills for Parents and Providers. S...
34
Brems, M., Chan, M. and Rosner, J. (in press). English for Child Development:
Language Skills for Parents and Providers...
35
Brems, M., Chan, M. and Rosner, J. (in press). English for Child Development:
Language Skills for Parents and Providers...
36
Brems, M., Chan, M. and Rosner, J. (in press). English for Child Development:
Language Skills for Parents and Providers...
37
Brems, M., Chan, M. and Rosner, J. (in press). English for Child Development:
Language Skills for Parents and Providers...
Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner
38
Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner
39
Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 40
Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner
41
Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner
42
Follow-­‐up  activity  for  students
v Read their own books
aloud to their
classmates.
v Listen and enjoy
classmates’ bo...
Summary
v Encourage bilingualismby taking an asset-
based perspective.
v Use activities that foster bilingualism.
v quo...
www.sunburstmedia.com
45
Q&A  
Thank you for your  attention!
For information about our books,
go to Sunburst Media:
http://www.sunburstmedia.com
J...
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Encouraging adult English learners to help children become bilingual

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Adult English learners can play a crucial role in helping young children maintain their home language and become bilingual. The presenters demonstrate several activities using and valuing home and school languages, fostering growth in dual language learners. Attendees examine a bilingual book project and discuss adaptations for their own students.

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Encouraging adult English learners to help children become bilingual

  1. 1. Encouraging  adult  English   learners  to  help  children   become  bilingual Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner Instructors,Curriculum Developers,Authors1
  2. 2. Workshop  outcomes v Gain familiarity with asset-based perspectives of bilingualism v Recognize ways to promote bilingualism v within ESL lessons v Reading and writing v Listening and speaking v English for Child Care v in everydayinteractions with students Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 2
  3. 3. Traditional  emphasis   on  the  L2  English v Adults have already developed skills in their native language. v Teachers typically encourage ESL students to use English and discourage them from using L1. v As adult ESL students gain proficiency in English, they become bilingual. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 3
  4. 4. Have  you  heard  of… v apologies for native language use? v penalties for using L1 during ESL class? v lack of proficiency in English as a deficit? Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 4
  5. 5. Impact  of  attitude  on  families v How does a deficit- based attitude affect our students’ perspective on using L1 in their homes? v What effect can an asset-based approach have? Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 5
  6. 6. L1:  asset  or  deficit? Approached from a deficit perspective, students who are English language learners (ELL) are often defined as fundamentally lacking. By contrast, an asset-based perspective builds on the home language of students and recognizes this as a fundamental strength. -Martin Scanlan, An Asset-based Approach to Linguistic Diversity, 2007 Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 6
  7. 7. Dual  language  learners v Children who are Dual Language Learners (DLLs) acquire two or more languages simultaneously, and learn a second language while continuing to develop their first language. The term "dual language learners" encompasses other terms frequently used, such as Limited English Proficient (LEP), bilingual, English language learners (ELL), and English learners. v The term dual language learners has been adopted by the Office of Head Start and the United States Department of Education to highlight and promote the linguistic assets of young children and families who speak languages other than English. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 7
  8. 8. How  can  ESL  teachers… v let our students know that their L1 is an asset? v help our students show their children that L1 is a gift? v foster an asset-based perspective among our adult learners of L2 English? Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 8
  9. 9. Encourage  support  for   bilingualism v Give adult ESL learners information about… v importance of home language v language development v Give them opportunities to promote bilingualism – dual language acquisition among children. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 9
  10. 10. Activity  1:  Reading  a  quote   about  the  home  language v Pre-reading v Vocabulary v Schema v Read v Discuss the quotation together Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 10 Brems, M., Chan, M. and Rosner, J. (in press). English for Child Development: Language Skills for Parents and Providers. Sunnyvale, CA: Sunburst Media.
  11. 11. Purposes  of  quote  activity v Inform students of the importance of the home language. v Develop vocabulary. v Give exposure to research by experts. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 11
  12. 12. Vocabulary  practice 1. ____ home language 2. ____ to support 3. ____ to maintain 4. ____ to be connected to people 5. ____ advantages 6. ____ to thrive a. to feel close to family and friends b. to help and to give what is needed c. the language spoken by family at home d. the good things about something e. to be healthy and successful f. to keep something in good condition Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 12
  13. 13. Pre-­‐reading  questions 1. What is your home language? What was your grandparents’ home language? 1. Do you know any children whose home language is not English? How are they learning English? 2. What does it mean to support a child’s home language? Who supports a child’s home language? Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 13
  14. 14. Quote  from  an  ECE*  expert All children need English in order to thrive in their new country. They also need support in maintaining their home language in order to stay deeply connected to their families, as well as for the many advantages of being bilingual. Derman-Sparks, Louise, and Julie Olsen Edwards. Anti-Bias Education for Young Children and Ourselves (2010): 63. *ECE: Early Childhood Education Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 14
  15. 15. Discussion  questions 1. What does this quote mean? 2. How can adults help children to maintain their home language? 3. How does a language help children stay connected with family? 4. What are some advantages of being bilingual? Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 15
  16. 16. Activity  2:  Listening  to  a  passage  about   language  development     v Pre-listening v Develop schema. v Listen and fill in. v Check comprehension. v Discuss the research. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 16Brems, M., Chan, M. and Rosner, J. (in press). English for Child Development: Language Skills for Parents and Providers. Sunnyvale, CA: Sunburst Media.
  17. 17. Purposes  of  listening  cloze v To give information about language development. v To hone listening, vocabulary, and dictation skills. v To expose students to research by experts. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 17
  18. 18. Pre-­‐listening  questions 1. What do parents and caregivers do to help young children learn language? 2. What does ‘talkative’ mean? Do you know someone who is talkative? What is a talkative environment? 3. Guess. What happens when children know few words when they start school? What happens when children know many words? Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 18
  19. 19. Listen  and  fill  in  the  blanks. In talkative _______________ , children hear many words every day. They hear stories and _______________ and descriptions and advice. Some children _______________ as many as 20,000 and 30,000 _______________ a day. In other homes, however, there is a lot less ______________. Over time, there is a big difference in how many _______________ the children have heard. By age three , children from _______________ homes have heard 20 to 30 _______________ more words than children from non-talkative _______________ . This difference has a big _______________ on children’s ability to succeed in school and life. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 19
  20. 20. Listening  cloze,  contd. _______________ children need to hear a lot of words to help them develop their language _______________ . Parents and teachers can use _______________ conversational strategies to increase the _______________ of words that children hear. _______________ main strategies are: tune in, talk more, and take turns. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 20
  21. 21. Check  comprehension. Read the statements below. Mark them as T for true or F for false based on the information above. If a sentence is false, change it to make it true. ____ A child may hear 10,000 words a day in a talkative environment. ____ Talkative environments include descriptions, stories, and advice. ____ By age 3, children from non-talkative homes have heard 20 to 30 million more words than children from talkative homes. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 21
  22. 22. Discuss  the  questions. 1. What happens when a child knows a lot of words? What happens when a child doesn’t? 2. Are you surprised by the information above? 3. What do you think adults can do to help children hear lots of words? Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 22
  23. 23. Fast  facts Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 23 v In a study of 42 parents and their babies, Betty Hart and Todd Risley discovered vast differences between families. v Babies from professional families heard an average of 2,100 words per hour. v Babies from working class families heard an average of 1,200 words per hour. v Babies with parents on public assistance heard an average of 600 words per hour.
  24. 24. Activity  3:  Expanding  language v Develop a strategy for talking more v Develop ability to repeat and expand a child’s words v in English v in home language Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 24 Brems, M., Chan, M. and Rosner, J. (in press). English for Child Development: Language Skills for Parents and Providers. Sunnyvale, CA: Sunburst Media.
  25. 25. Purposes  of  speaking  task v To provide students with a specific strategy for using more words v To practice the strategy in both languages v To develop grammatical competence Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 25
  26. 26. Rationale One important way to help children hear more language is by responding to a child’s sounds and words. It is helpful for caregivers to repeat a child’s words and expand on them. They say the child’s words in full sentences and add other ideas, too. In this way, the child learns more about her environment while learning language. Here are some examples of repeating and expanding: Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 26
  27. 27. Repetition  and  expansion v Child: “Doggie eat.” v Child: “Truck broken.” v Child: “More milk.” v Adult: “Yes, the doggie is eating.” v Adult: “Yes, I see the truck is broken. We can try to fix it.” v Adult: “Oh, I see. You finished your milk. You want more.” Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 27
  28. 28. Practice  repeating  -­‐ expanding Read the child’s words below. These are 2-3 word phrases. Repeat and expand these phrases. Say your answer aloud to a partner. Listen as your partner repeats and expands the phrase. Choose the answer you like best and write it down. Example: v Child:Car gone. v Partner A: Here’s my answer: “The car is gone. Aunt Mary drove home.” v Partner B: Good one. Here’s what I say: “That’s right. Aunt Mary drove the car home so the car is gone.” v Partner A: You used more words. It’s good for children to hear more words, so I’m writing down your answer. v Partner B: Well, I like your answer, so I’m writing yours. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 28
  29. 29. Expand  2-­‐3  word  utterances with  a  partner 1. Cat outside! 2. Mommy hungry. 3. No school. 4. Ball right here 5. Have it! 6. Daddy home. 7. No more juice. 8. Go store. 9. Toys away. 10.Grandma come. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 29
  30. 30. Activate  home  language Children benefit from hearing lots of words, in any language! They benefit from hearing many words in their home language as well as English. Choose five of the sentences above and translate them into your home language. Then repeat and expand on the words in your own language. Example: Cat outside. -àGato afuera. El gato está afuera. ¿A ver? ¿Quiere entrar? Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 30
  31. 31. Activity  4:  Bilingual  booklet v Talk with children aged 3-15. v Take dictation of what younger children say. v Help older children complete the sentences. v Create a book with sentences and pictures. v Share their books. Ésta es mi historia. Đây là câu chuyện của tôi. 这是我的故事。 This is my story. 31Brems, M., Chan, M. and Rosner, J. (in press). English for Child Development: Language Skills for Parents and Providers. Sunnyvale, CA: Sunburst Media.
  32. 32. Purposes  of  booklet  activity v To demonstrate the value of home language v To provide the opportunity to publish v To encourage creativity v To foster connection between home and school cultures Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 32
  33. 33. Brems, M., Chan, M. and Rosner, J. (in press). English for Child Development: Language Skills for Parents and Providers. Sunnyvale, CA: Sunburst Media. 33
  34. 34. 34 Brems, M., Chan, M. and Rosner, J. (in press). English for Child Development: Language Skills for Parents and Providers. Sunnyvale, CA: Sunburst Media.
  35. 35. 35 Brems, M., Chan, M. and Rosner, J. (in press). English for Child Development: Language Skills for Parents and Providers. Sunnyvale, CA: Sunburst Media.
  36. 36. 36 Brems, M., Chan, M. and Rosner, J. (in press). English for Child Development: Language Skills for Parents and Providers. Sunnyvale, CA: Sunburst Media.
  37. 37. 37 Brems, M., Chan, M. and Rosner, J. (in press). English for Child Development: Language Skills for Parents and Providers. Sunnyvale, CA: Sunburst Media.
  38. 38. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 38
  39. 39. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 39
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  43. 43. Follow-­‐up  activity  for  students v Read their own books aloud to their classmates. v Listen and enjoy classmates’ books. v Share experiences about dual language learning. v Learn about other cultures. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 43
  44. 44. Summary v Encourage bilingualismby taking an asset- based perspective. v Use activities that foster bilingualism. v quotation reading v listening cloze v repeating and expanding in English and L1 v bilingual book project v Find everyday ways to encourage adults to help their children become bilingual. Marsha Chan and Julaine Rosner 44
  45. 45. www.sunburstmedia.com 45
  46. 46. Q&A   Thank you for your  attention! For information about our books, go to Sunburst Media: http://www.sunburstmedia.com Julaine Rosner julaine.rosner@wvm.edu MarshaChan marsha@sunburstmedia.com 46

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