Marsha ChanESL Professor, Mission College, Santa Clara, California  Text & Multimedia Author, “Pronunciation Doctor”
Developing pronunciation skills Perception – Observation – Comprehension    Listening    Seeing    Feeling Practice –...
Focus on perception before production. L1 acquisition research shows that    acquisition begins prenatally and auditoril...
Make prosody practice a prioritized primarytarget. Intonation             Syllable length                         Tone ...
Concentrate on high-frequencyphonological features. Phonological-morphological endings    -s/-es ==> /s/, /z/, /iz/    ...
Prioritize phonological differences thataffect meaning. Which of these minimal    Can be confused:  pairs may cause     ...
Use movement. Tapping Clapping Stepping Stretching
The Stress Stretch When you do the Stress Stretch,  you move your whole body. A stressed syllable is longer, stronger, c...
Stretch up as you say the stressed syllable.Sit down as you say the unstressed ones.                                      ...
Learning to do the Stress Stretch                                                          act                           ...
Rubber band help stretch vowels          www.youtube.com/PronunciationDoctor
Lead plenty of choral repetition.Repetition activates neurophysiological connections facilitates automaticity and flexib...
Include songs, rhymes, and chants.              www.youtube.com/PronunciationDoctor      Brems, M., Rosner, J, and Chan, M...
Use technology to enhance learningIn addition to the video clipspresented, examine three softwareexamples: Interactive on...
Online quizzes – a sampler
Online quizzes
Online quizzes
Online quizzes
Online quizzes
Online quizzes
Sentence stress   Rost, M. Longman English Interactive, Levels 1 and 2. (Chan, M. contributing author,      Pronunciation,...
Question stress and intonation   Rost, M. Longman English Interactive, Levels 1 and 2. (Chan, M. contributing author,     ...
Stress for understanding old vs. new info     Rost, M. Longman English Interactive, Levels 1 and 2. (Chan, M. contributing...
Reduced vowel sounds Rost, M. and Fuchs, M., Longman English Interactive, Levels 3 and 4. (Chan,M. contributing author, Pr...
Intonation: noticing stress and pitch change     Rost, M. Longman English Interactive, Levels 1 and 2. (Chan, M. contribut...
Pause groups: Mark and record     Westwood, V. and Kaufmann, H. (2001-2013). Connected Speech (Version 6)         [Compute...
Stress: Identify content words     Westwood, V. and Kaufmann, H. (2001-2013). Connected Speech (Version 6)         [Comput...
Pitch: Identify focus words      Westwood, V. and Kaufmann, H. (2001-2013). Connected Speech (Version 6)          [Compute...
Linking: Mark and record     Westwood, V. and Kaufmann, H. (2001-2013). Connected Speech (Version 6)         [Computer sof...
Linking: Identify why      Westwood, V. and Kaufmann, H. (2001-2013). Connected Speech (Version 6)          [Computer soft...
Stress: Contrasting      Westwood, V. and Kaufmann, H. (2001-2013). Connected Speech (Version 6)          [Computer softwa...
Marsha ChanAdditional presentations at TESOL 2013Thu 5 pm Learning the Music of Spoken EnglishFri 10 am Mobile Apps for Ed...
Creating and Choosing the Best Materials for Speaking and Pronunciation, with video links
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Creating and Choosing the Best Materials for Speaking and Pronunciation, with video links

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With Steve Jones as moderator, Marsha Chan, Judy Gilbert, and Tamara Jones presented a framework for deciding how to incorporate speaking and pronunciation topics into English language teaching and learning materials. The proposed framework is intended to help materials writers and teachers in designing or choosing effective materials. Which aspects of pronunciation are important for comprehensibility? Which can be taught and learned, and through which strategies? Here is Marsha Chan's contribution to the colloquium.

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  • Myapproach to pronunciation development engages learners in the process. It starts with perception and observation: Listening, noticing, and hearing. Looking, watching, and seeing. Touching, noticing, and feeling. Developing receptive skills enables learners to make changes in productive skills, that is, pronouncing, speaking, conversing, through modeling, practice, correction, guidance and instruction. [click to animate arrows.] It’s a recursive process of perception, practice, and progress; perception, practice, and progress.
  • Bailey, R (2009, November 6). Learning Language in the Womb. About.com Guide. Retrieved March 17, 2013, from http://biology.about.com/b/2009/11/06/learning-language-in-the-womb.htmDallas, M. E. (2013, January 8). Do Babies Begin Learning Language in the Womb? Mediline Plus, a service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. Retrieved March 17, 2013, from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_132882.htmlGreenfieldboyce, N. (2009, November 06). Babies May Pick Up Language Cues In Womb. NPR. Retrieved March 17, 2013, from http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=120131516Researchers have discovered that babies reproduce intonations of language patterns that they have memorized while in the womb.A 2009 study of over a thousand recorded cries from 30 French newborns and 30 German newborns found differences in the cries' melody patterns. French cries tended to have a rising melody, while the German cries tended to have a falling melody. Kathleen Wermke of the Center for Prespeech Development and Developmental Disorders at the University of Wurzburg in Germany. As researcher Angela Friederici explains, "In French, a lot of words have stress at the end, so that the intonation rises, while in German, it is mostly the opposite." This study shows that newborns produce sounds with intonation patterns that are familiar. Previous studies have already shown that newborns appear to show a preference for melodies that they heard prenatally. And TobenMintz, associate professor of psychology and linguistics at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, says scientists already knew that newborns can distinguish different languages, probably based on rhythmic patterns. Jan. 8, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Language development begins in the womb, during the last 10 weeks of pregnancy, a small new study of U.S. and Swedish infants suggests.Researchers noted that these skills can be demonstrated within the first few hours of life…Just hours after birth, babies can tell the difference between their mother's native language and a foreign language, the study authors found.
  • You can learn to hear and speak English better if you use body movement to feel syllables, stress and rhythm. When you do the Stress Stretch, you move your whole body. A stressed syllable is longer, stronger, clearer, and often higher in pitch than an unstressed syllable. As you say the words and phrases below, stand up and stretch on the stressed syllable; sit down on the unstressed syllables. 
  • Let’s watch while a French speaker learns this technique to modify his stress and intonation patterns. http://youtu.be/4mzHx4v1DFs
  • I lead students in telling a story, stretching rubber band while stretching the vowels in the key words. Phrase by Phrase Ch4 SIC1: Stretch content words with a rubber band http://youtu.be/Fft-_WXpT9gPhrase by Phrase Ch5 SIC1 Lengthening content words with a rubber band http://youtu.be/6g-bpUJ8f1sStudents practice reciting the story, using a rubber band to remind them to stretch out the vowels in the stressed syllables of the content words.Phrase by Phrase Ch5 SIC1 Students stretch content words with a rubber band. http://youtu.be/vso11_3Iy6c
  • Kjellin , O (n.d). Choral Practice - the Neurophysiological Opportunist's Way. Academia.edu. Retrieved March 17, 2013, from http://www.academia.edu/2184625/Choral_Practice-the_Neurophysiological_Opportunists_Way.50-100 repetitions generate a statistical “feel” for phonological, syntactical, semantic, and pragmatic aspects of a phraseRepetition activates neurophysiological connections.Repetition facilitates automaticity and flexibility.Repetition promotes perception of allophonic boundaries.Practice makes perfect.
  • In my English for Child Care class, students learn songs that they can sing with children.http://youtu.be/LvQ637AhJXE
  • Here are few examples of online quizzes. I've created hundreds of quizzes like this. I allow students unlimited attempts in order to gain familiarity with a concept, learn properties of the English pronunciation system, improve accuracy and increase speed. Some require listening and discriminating what they here. Others require them to apply pronunciation rules or patterns. Tell whether the /h/ sound is required or can be omitted and linked to the previous word, enter the syllable-stress code, identify which syllable has a reduced vowel, tell whether a pair of words has the same or different word patterns, listen for –s endings, identify –s endings.After completing all of the items and submitting the quiz, they get a score. Learners find it very motivating to increase their score through repeated practice.
  • Here are few examples of online quizzes. I've created hundreds of quizzes like this. I allow students unlimited attempts in order to gain familiarity with a concept, learn properties of the English pronunciation system, improve accuracy and increase speed. Some require listening and discriminating what they here. Others require them to apply pronunciation rules or patterns. Tell whether the /h/ sound is required or can be omitted and linked to the previous word, enter the syllable-stress code, identify which syllable has a reduced vowel, tell whether a pair of words has the same or different word patterns, listen for –s endings, identify –s endings.After completing all of the items and submitting the quiz, they get a score. Learners find it very motivating to increase their score through repeated practice.
  • Here are few examples of online quizzes. I've created hundreds of quizzes like this. I allow students unlimited attempts in order to gain familiarity with a concept, learn properties of the English pronunciation system, improve accuracy and increase speed. Some require listening and discriminating what they here. Others require them to apply pronunciation rules or patterns. Tell whether the /h/ sound is required or can be omitted and linked to the previous word, enter the syllable-stress code, identify which syllable has a reduced vowel, tell whether a pair of words has the same or different word patterns, listen for –s endings, identify –s endings.After completing all of the items and submitting the quiz, they get a score. Learners find it very motivating to increase their score through repeated practice.
  • Here are few examples of online quizzes. I've created hundreds of quizzes like this. I allow students unlimited attempts in order to gain familiarity with a concept, learn properties of the English pronunciation system, improve accuracy and increase speed. Some require listening and discriminating what they here. Others require them to apply pronunciation rules or patterns. Tell whether the /h/ sound is required or can be omitted and linked to the previous word, enter the syllable-stress code, identify which syllable has a reduced vowel, tell whether a pair of words has the same or different word patterns, listen for –s endings, identify –s endings.After completing all of the items and submitting the quiz, they get a score. Learners find it very motivating to increase their score through repeated practice.
  • Here are few examples of online quizzes. I've created hundreds of quizzes like this. I allow students unlimited attempts in order to gain familiarity with a concept, learn properties of the English pronunciation system, improve accuracy and increase speed. Some require listening and discriminating what they here. Others require them to apply pronunciation rules or patterns. Tell whether the /h/ sound is required or can be omitted and linked to the previous word, enter the syllable-stress code, identify which syllable has a reduced vowel, tell whether a pair of words has the same or different word patterns, listen for –s endings, identify –s endings.After completing all of the items and submitting the quiz, they get a score. Learners find it very motivating to increase their score through repeated practice.
  • Here are few examples of online quizzes. I've created hundreds of quizzes like this. I allow students unlimited attempts in order to gain familiarity with a concept, learn properties of the English pronunciation system, improve accuracy and increase speed. Some require listening and discriminating what they here. Others require them to apply pronunciation rules or patterns. Tell whether the /h/ sound is required or can be omitted and linked to the previous word, enter the syllable-stress code, identify which syllable has a reduced vowel, tell whether a pair of words has the same or different word patterns, listen for –s endings, identify –s endings.After completing all of the items and submitting the quiz, they get a score. Learners find it very motivating to increase their score through repeated practice.
  • http://youtu.be/37ZgKwuQoxkThe Longman English Interactive series is an all-skills program available on CD-ROM, for networks, and by online subscription. There are many positive attributes to the LEI program by Michael Rost and Marjorie Fuchs, and today I’m going to focus only on the pronunciation lessons, which I know well because I wrote them. I’m gonna show you how animation can help emphasize the difficult parts of suprasegmental features that are impossible to get just by looking at a written text.Rost, M. Longman English Interactive, Levels 1 and 2. (Chan,M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 1 and 2.) White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education Rost, M. and Fuchs, M., Longman English Interactive, Levels 3 and 4. (Chan,M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 3and 4.) . White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education
  • http://youtu.be/i76-EGBNgXsThe Longman English Interactive series is an all-skills program available on CD-ROM, for networks, and by online subscription. There are many positive attributes to the LEI program by Michael Rost, and today I’m going to focus only on the pronunciation lessons, which I know well because I wrote them. I’m gonna show you how animation can help emphasize the difficult parts of suprasegmental features that are impossible to get just by looking at a written text.Rost, M. Longman English Interactive, Levels 1 and 2. (Chan,M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 1 and 2.) White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education Rost, M. and Fuchs, M., Longman English Interactive, Levels 3 and 4. (Chan,M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 3and 4.) . White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education
  • http://youtu.be/zu2ZPBxZiQ8Rost, M. Longman English Interactive, Levels 1 and 2. (Chan,M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 1 and 2.) White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education Rost, M. and Fuchs, M., Longman English Interactive, Levels 3 and 4. (Chan,M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 3and 4.) . White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education
  • http://youtu.be/FLs6-ep6kiURost, M. Longman English Interactive, Levels 1 and 2. (Chan,M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 1 and 2.) White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education Rost, M. and Fuchs, M., Longman English Interactive, Levels 3 and 4. (Chan,M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 3and 4.) . White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education
  • http://youtu.be/eb8_JtDSnMMRost, M. Longman English Interactive, Levels 1 and 2. (Chan,M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 1 and 2.) White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education Rost, M. and Fuchs, M., Longman English Interactive, Levels 3 and 4. (Chan,M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 3and 4.) . White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education
  • http://youtu.be/30FwNQ7gShohttp://www.sunburstmedia.com/connectedspeech.html
  • http://youtu.be/USwilkMIU5E
  • http://youtu.be/hhems2xr_t4
  • http://youtu.be/LdK74u-IXhc
  • http://youtu.be/9m-Oid16Ig4
  • http://youtu.be/uy0vjGFtRe0
  • I hope I’ve provided useful ideas about creating and choosing the best materials for speaking and pronunciation, from the no-tech stress stretch, to the low-tech rubber band, to videos that provide pronunciation instruction, to online quizzes for repeated practice, to software that provides visual-motion animation to support auditory and oral practice, to interactive software that provide learners immediate feedback. Besides instructional videos produced in a studio, I have over a thousand videos on my Pronunciation Doctor Youtube site that you are all welcome to access for free. Here’s where you can catch me at the conference as well as online afterwards.
  • Creating and Choosing the Best Materials for Speaking and Pronunciation, with video links

    1. 1. Marsha ChanESL Professor, Mission College, Santa Clara, California Text & Multimedia Author, “Pronunciation Doctor”
    2. 2. Developing pronunciation skills Perception – Observation – Comprehension  Listening  Seeing  Feeling Practice – Production – Progress  Controlled  Guided 2
    3. 3. Focus on perception before production. L1 acquisition research shows that  acquisition begins prenatally and auditorily  prosody may be of crucial importance from early on L2 application: Focus learners’ attention on perceiving the rhythm and intonation of the language  auditory, visual, kinesthetic input  without speaking Dallas, M. E. (2013, January 8). Do Babies Begin Learning Language in the Womb? Mediline Plus. Retrieved March 17, 2013, from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_132882.html Greenfieldboyce, N. (2009, November 06).Babies May Pick Up Language Cues In Womb. NPR. Retrieved March 17, 2013, from http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=120131516
    4. 4. Make prosody practice a prioritized primarytarget. Intonation  Syllable length  Tone / pitch Rhythm  Word stress  Phrase stress Vocal stress  Clause stress
    5. 5. Concentrate on high-frequencyphonological features. Phonological-morphological endings  -s/-es ==> /s/, /z/, /iz/  /s/: duck-ducks, get-gets, Pat-Pat’s  /z/: dog-dogs, run-runs, Marsha-Marsha’s  /iz/: box-boxes, wash-washes, Liz-Liz’s  -ed ==> /t/, /d/, /id/  /t/: work-worked, stress-stressed  /d/: learn-learned, bore-bored  /id/: need-needed, excite-excited
    6. 6. Prioritize phonological differences thataffect meaning. Which of these minimal  Can be confused: pairs may cause  He needs a map-mop. miscommunication?  I bought a pan-fan.  map-mop  Come on Tuesday-Thursday  pan-fan  Not confused:  Tuesday-Thursday  She cot-caught it.  cot-caught  That’s a cot-caught.  tick-thick  It’s very tick-thick.  That’s a tick-thick.
    7. 7. Use movement. Tapping Clapping Stepping Stretching
    8. 8. The Stress Stretch When you do the Stress Stretch, you move your whole body. A stressed syllable is longer, stronger, clearer, and often higher in pitch than an unstressed syllable. As you say the words and phrases below, stand up and stretch on the stressed syllable; sit down on the unstressed syllables. Chan, M. (1994). Stress Stretch, in New Ways in Teaching Speaking, Kathleen Bailey, Editor. Alexandria, VA: Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc.
    9. 9. Stretch up as you say the stressed syllable.Sit down as you say the unstressed ones.  positive English  library happy common  important pronounce  community attend Chan, M. (2009). Phrase by Phrase Pronunciation in American English (2e),  pronunciation Sunnyvale: Sunburst Media 9
    10. 10. Learning to do the Stress Stretch  act  care  knows  bridge  careful  bridges  pronounce  compete www.youtube.com/PronunciationDoctor  She knows. Chan, M. (2009). Phrase by Phrase Pronunciation in American English (2e), Sunnyvale: Sunburst Media
    11. 11. Rubber band help stretch vowels www.youtube.com/PronunciationDoctor
    12. 12. Lead plenty of choral repetition.Repetition activates neurophysiological connections facilitates automaticity and flexibility promotes perception of allophonic boundaries 50-100 repetitions generate a statistical “feel” for phonological, syntactical, semantic, and pragmatic aspects of a phrase Kjellin , O. Choral Practice - the Neurophysiological Opportunists Way. Academia.edu. Retrieved March 17, 2013, from http://www.academia.edu/2184625/Choral_Practice- the_Neurophysiological_Opportunists_Way. Practice makes perfect.
    13. 13. Include songs, rhymes, and chants. www.youtube.com/PronunciationDoctor Brems, M., Rosner, J, and Chan, M (2010). English for Child Care Language Skills for Parents and Providers, Sunnyvale: Sunburst Media
    14. 14. Use technology to enhance learningIn addition to the video clipspresented, examine three softwareexamples: Interactive online quizzes in a content management system Animation of prosodic elements in a software program: Longman English Interactive Animation and interactivity in a software program: Connected Speech
    15. 15. Online quizzes – a sampler
    16. 16. Online quizzes
    17. 17. Online quizzes
    18. 18. Online quizzes
    19. 19. Online quizzes
    20. 20. Online quizzes
    21. 21. Sentence stress Rost, M. Longman English Interactive, Levels 1 and 2. (Chan, M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 1 & 2.) White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education
    22. 22. Question stress and intonation Rost, M. Longman English Interactive, Levels 1 and 2. (Chan, M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 1 & 2.) White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education
    23. 23. Stress for understanding old vs. new info Rost, M. Longman English Interactive, Levels 1 and 2. (Chan, M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 1 & 2.) White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education
    24. 24. Reduced vowel sounds Rost, M. and Fuchs, M., Longman English Interactive, Levels 3 and 4. (Chan,M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 3 and 4.) . White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education
    25. 25. Intonation: noticing stress and pitch change Rost, M. Longman English Interactive, Levels 1 and 2. (Chan, M. contributing author, Pronunciation, Levels 1 & 2.) White Plains, NY: Longman / Pearson Education
    26. 26. Pause groups: Mark and record Westwood, V. and Kaufmann, H. (2001-2013). Connected Speech (Version 6) [Computer software]. Hurstbridge VIC, Australia: ProteaTextware
    27. 27. Stress: Identify content words Westwood, V. and Kaufmann, H. (2001-2013). Connected Speech (Version 6) [Computer software]. Hurstbridge VIC, Australia: ProteaTextware
    28. 28. Pitch: Identify focus words Westwood, V. and Kaufmann, H. (2001-2013). Connected Speech (Version 6) [Computer software]. Hurstbridge VIC, Australia: ProteaTextware
    29. 29. Linking: Mark and record Westwood, V. and Kaufmann, H. (2001-2013). Connected Speech (Version 6) [Computer software]. Hurstbridge VIC, Australia: ProteaTextware
    30. 30. Linking: Identify why Westwood, V. and Kaufmann, H. (2001-2013). Connected Speech (Version 6) [Computer software]. Hurstbridge VIC, Australia: ProteaTextware
    31. 31. Stress: Contrasting Westwood, V. and Kaufmann, H. (2001-2013). Connected Speech (Version 6) [Computer software]. Hurstbridge VIC, Australia: ProteaTextware
    32. 32. Marsha ChanAdditional presentations at TESOL 2013Thu 5 pm Learning the Music of Spoken EnglishFri 10 am Mobile Apps for Education: AnytuneFri 5 pm Interactive Multimedia English Language SoftwareSat 10 am EV Technology Fair: Using Video to Flip the ClassroomContact informationmarsha@sunburstmedia.comwww.youtube.com/PronunciationDoctorwww.linkedin.com/in/PronunciationDoctorwww.slideshare.net/purplecastmarshaprofdev.blogspot.comwww.sunburstmedia.com/present/present.htmlwww.missioncollege.edu/depts/esl/faculty/chan/chan.html

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