Psychoeducational GroupsDavid BarryRoadblocks to RecoveryDescription:There are many roadblocks to recovery. This psychoedu...
Psychoeducational GroupsDavid Barry           D. The lead participant will blindfolded and required to go along the path o...
Psychoeducational GroupsDavid Barry2] How did the Lead Participant and Guide overcome some of their roadblocks?3] What are...
Psychoeducational GroupsDavid BarryRoadblocks to Recovery Role-Play SheetLEAD PARTICIPANT:You will be lead blindfolded alo...
Psychoeducational GroupsDavid Barry
Psychoeducational GroupsDavid Barry
Psychoeducational GroupsDavid Barry
Psychoeducational GroupsDavid BarrySample Roadblocks for BasicEveryone wants to know what has happened to you.You feel you...
Psychoeducational GroupsDavid BarryReview of ExerciseAfter each set of participants completes the exercise ask them how th...
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Exercise: Roadblocks to Recovery

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Group Exercise on Recovery

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Exercise: Roadblocks to Recovery

  1. 1. Psychoeducational GroupsDavid BarryRoadblocks to RecoveryDescription:There are many roadblocks to recovery. This psychoeducational group session focuses on someof the roadblocks individuals may face when returning to the community and how they cansuccessfully continue their recovery process.GoalsAt then end of this exercise participants will be able to:1] Describe many of the obstacles [roadblocks] to recovery and how those roadblocks can worsentheir psychological well being.2] Review options they have for overcoming many of the roadblocks to recovery.3] Discuss how they have choices and how to make good choices that promote recovery.Materials Needed:  Masking tape  Paper plates with roadblocks identified  Blindfold  Roles to recovery role-play sheetsNote for Facilitator:  In advance of this session have tape placed on floor [Use one of the diagrams included in this exercise to help place the tape.]. Overall route should be about 30-40 feet with at least 4 directional changes. Do not have plates placed on floor at the beginning of the session.  Have a set of paper plates with the roadblocks written out available. Also have some blank plates for participants to identify other roadblocks. Only put plates down once the Lead Participant is blindfolded. See Sample roadblock Sheet attached.Structure [Basic Roadblocks] 1: 1. Briefly discuss how the recovery process is a challenge and individuals may face various roadblocks to recovery and their successful return to the community. 2. Ask participants to identify what they think will be some roadblocks they might encounter when they return to their communities. 3. Briefly describe how the exercise will work. [This overall process can be repeated for several participants, but only one at a time.] A. The Lead Participant will play the part of the person returning to the community. B. A second participant, The Guide, will play the Primary Support Person who will verbally guide the blindfolded, Lead Participant, through the Recovery Road. C. Other participants will have various roles they can play during the exercise. Those roles are described on the Road to Recovery Role-Play Sheets.
  2. 2. Psychoeducational GroupsDavid Barry D. The lead participant will blindfolded and required to go along the path outlined on the floor, marked by tape. [Refer to the diagram on the Roadblocks to Recovery Sheet attached]. The Guide will give verbal directions to help the Lead walk the Road to Recovery. E. Other members of the group will be assigned roles identified on the Roadblocks to Recovery Role-play Sheet. They will try to interrupt the Lead Participant as he follows the Road to Recovery. F. Only one member will be assigned as the Lead and one as the Guide. The other roles can be given to more than one participant. G. If the Lead Participants steps on a Roadblock or off the line he can only move forward if he can give a description of what could be done to overcome the roadblock.Variations: Roadblocks DynamicIn this version only thestarting tape is put on thefloor in advance of the exercise. Starting LineAs the participant goes from oneRoadblock to another a new path isoutlined with the tape.The new plate is put down following Old friendthe offerstheme of the last roadblock. you YouFor example one path might look drugs arelike the figure on the left. bored andFollowing this theme participants geta Youperspective on how a poor decisioncan want tohave several negative quit theconsequences. They can also program Thediscuss how to correct the path and medscontinue on Recovery. make youPrompt Questions for ActivityBefore the actual activity starts list out on chart or board three questions you want participants tothink about during this activity.1] What are some of the roadblocks to recovery you think you might face?
  3. 3. Psychoeducational GroupsDavid Barry2] How did the Lead Participant and Guide overcome some of their roadblocks?3] What are the choices you can make to promote recovery?
  4. 4. Psychoeducational GroupsDavid BarryRoadblocks to Recovery Role-Play SheetLEAD PARTICIPANT:You will be lead blindfolded along the road to recovery. Your Guide person will help you navigatethe Road. If you step on the line or on one of the Roadblocks you must describe how you couldovercome the roadblock.PRIMARY SUPPORT PERSON.- GuideYou will help the lead participant navigate the Road to Recovery by giving calm, concise andaccurate directions. For example, “move your left foot about 12 inches ahead.”All instruction is done verbally you cannot physically direct the participant.“JOHNNY TOO BAD” OR “THE BAD ANGEL”You do not want the person to succeed and continuously make comments designed to cause him tofail in his recovery. For example, “You not need to see that stupid therapist. How can he help you?”Your comments must be given at a low murmur volume not to override the Primary Support Personscomments.“DUDLEY DO RIGHT” OR “THE GOOD ANGEL”You want the person to succeed, despite how he is. Everything you do is better, but if he does whatyou tell him to do he might be all right. For example you might say, “Well you will probablyeventually fail, but right now you need to do…. “ Your comments must be given at a low murmurvolume not to override the Primary Support Persons commentsI AM HERE FOR YOU AS LONG AS YOU DO NOT NEED ANYTHINGYou want the lead participant to succeed and have some ideas that will could be helpful but areafraid of being dragged into the process. As long as nothing directly is asked of you, you are willingto help. You might say things like, “Try going to the clinic if you are feeling bad.” Or,” I know themedications taste horrible but helps keep you calm.” Your comments must be given at a lowmurmur volume not to override the Primary Support Persons commentsYOUR BEST, WORST FRIENDYou are the constant state of denial. You do not need mental health services, drugs are not aproblem and what the parole officer does not know won’t hurt you. You might say things like,“This is too much pressure, lets go get some smoke.” Or, “I can snatch that steak and get it undermy shirt before anyone blinks.” Your comments must be given at a low murmur volume not tooverride the Primary Support Persons comments.
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  8. 8. Psychoeducational GroupsDavid BarrySample Roadblocks for BasicEveryone wants to know what has happened to you.You feel you are being identified by a mental illness label.Your medication makes you too sleepy.It is hard to find a place to live.Your benefits will not start for two more weeks.You overall stress level is through the roof.You met some old friends and they want to get high.You are starting to hear voices telling you bad things.An old friend says he can give you some money to be a look-outYou have too much time on your handsYour family does not want to talk with youYou begin thinking about harming yourselfYou have not had a date in 1 monthYou lied on a job application and now people at work are asking you more questionsYou are lonely and need to meet some new peopleYou owe someone money and they say it is time to pay-up.The police begin to question you about a crime in the neighborhood, even though you had nothingto do with it.Things do not seem like they will ever get betterYou are cold and hungry and it is late at night with nowhere to go.Everyday is a trialYour only close support has moved out of townYour ex-girlfriend says she never wants to see you againYou find out an old enemy is now looking for you
  9. 9. Psychoeducational GroupsDavid BarryReview of ExerciseAfter each set of participants completes the exercise ask them how they felt the exercise went.What did they think were some of the successes and what do they think they could have donebetter.When a number of the participants have attempted the exercise and it is time to wrap up review theprompt questions.1] Describe many of the obstacles [roadblocks] to recovery and how those roadblocks can worsentheir psychological well being.2] Review options they have for overcoming many of the roadblocks to recovery.3] Discuss how they have choices and how to make good choices that promote recovery

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