Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Happiness: Where does it come from?
Roger Wilkinson
roger.wilkinson@jcu.edu.au
“Until the 1940s, the term ‘stress’ was used principally in
reference to metals and was virtually unknown outside
the worl...
“… it is no longer sufficient to be married or employed;
rather, it is imperative that one remains marriageable and
employ...
Overwork
Overconsumption
Time management
“Are you, like millions of Americans, caught in the
happiness trap? Russ Harris explains that the way most
of us go about ...
“ … positive psychology has developed an ideal of
‘mental health’ that essentially exalts a particular
personality type: ‘...
famil
y
wor
k
famil
y
wor
k
famil
y
wor
k
famil
y
work
“The metaphor of ‘work-life balance’ places at the
fulcrum of an imagined work-life seesaw, a clever, well
organised, athl...
“The metaphor of ‘work-life balance’ places at the
fulcrum of an imagined work-life seesaw, a clever, well
organised, athl...
“The flight attendant does physical labor when she
pushes heavy metal carts through the aisles, and she
does mental work w...
“There is an old-fashioned word for the body of skills that
emotional intelligence represents: character … The
bedrock of ...
Happiness needs to seen in an historical and personal
context
The discrediting of ‘public service’ over the past 3
decades...
The politics of happiness
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

The politics of happiness

252 views

Published on

QSuper Healthy, Wealthy and Wise Cairns Expo
Cairns Convention Centre 20 October 2015

Published in: Career
  • Be the first to comment

The politics of happiness

  1. 1. Happiness: Where does it come from? Roger Wilkinson roger.wilkinson@jcu.edu.au
  2. 2. “Until the 1940s, the term ‘stress’ was used principally in reference to metals and was virtually unknown outside the worlds of engineering and physics.” William Davies 2015 The happiness industry: How the government and big business sold us well-being, p. 130 Where does ‘stress’ come from?
  3. 3. “… it is no longer sufficient to be married or employed; rather, it is imperative that one remains marriageable and employable.” Micki McGee 2005 Self-Help Inc: Makeover culture in American life p. 12 “The supremacy of market contracts means that careers, living standards and relationships are in a permanent state of contingency, dependent upon the next twist in the markets’ volatile judgements and increasingly unprotected by commonly held institutions or systems for sharing risk.” Will Hutton 2008 The world we’re in p, 6 The ‘new insecurity’
  4. 4. Overwork Overconsumption Time management
  5. 5. “Are you, like millions of Americans, caught in the happiness trap? Russ Harris explains that the way most of us go about trying to find happiness ends up making us miserable, driving the epidemics of stress, anxiety, and depression. This empowering book presents the insights and techniques of ACT (Acceptance and Commitment Therapy) a revolutionary new psychotherapy based on cutting-edge research in behavioral psychology.”
  6. 6. “ … positive psychology has developed an ideal of ‘mental health’ that essentially exalts a particular personality type: ‘a cheerful, outgoing, goal-driven, status-seeking extravert … In failing to adopt a positive outlook or behaviours alleged conducive to happiness, one risks being perceived as obstructive, detrimental to productivity or workplace morale.” Ashley Frawley 2015 ‘Happiness Research: A Review of Critiques’ p. 64
  7. 7. famil y wor k
  8. 8. famil y wor k
  9. 9. famil y wor k
  10. 10. famil y work
  11. 11. “The metaphor of ‘work-life balance’ places at the fulcrum of an imagined work-life seesaw, a clever, well organised, athletic and able-bodied individual who, by virtue of their personal and individual capacities and skill, is able to keep all the balls in the air while remaining well balanced. However, as our data shows organising a liveable life relies on more than personal skills and good time management: it relies on decent working conditions, good work relationships, appropriate labour standards, affordable quality public care options, reasonable transport options and a supportive community.” Barbara Pocock et al 2012 Time bomb: Work, rest and play in Australia today p. 10
  12. 12. “The metaphor of ‘work-life balance’ places at the fulcrum of an imagined work-life seesaw, a clever, well organised, athletic and able-bodied individual who, by virtue of their personal and individual capacities and skill, is able to keep all the balls in the air while remaining well balanced. However, as our data shows organising a liveable life relies on more than personal skills and good time management: it relies on decent working conditions, good work relationships, appropriate labour standards, affordable quality public care options, reasonable transport options and a supportive community.” Barbara Pocock et al 2012 Time bomb: Work, rest and play in Australia today p. 10
  13. 13. “The flight attendant does physical labor when she pushes heavy metal carts through the aisles, and she does mental work when she prepares for and actually organizes emergency landings and evacuations…. But in the course of doing this physical and mental labor, she is also doing something more, something I define as emotional labor. This labor requires one to induce or suppress feeling in order to sustain the outward countenance that produces the proper state of mind in others ‐ in this case, the sense of being cared for in a convivial and safe place. This kind of labor calls for a coordination of mind and feeling, and it sometimes draws on a source of self that we honor as deep and integral to our personality.” Arlie Hochschild 1983 The managed heart: The commercialisation of human feeling pp. 6‐7 Emotional labour
  14. 14. “There is an old-fashioned word for the body of skills that emotional intelligence represents: character … The bedrock of character is self-discipline; the virtuous life, as philosophers since Aristotle have observed, is based on self-control. A related keystone of character is being able to motivate and guide oneself, whether in doing homework, finishing a job, or getting up in the morning. And, as we have seen, the ability to defer gratification and to control and channel one’s urges to act is a basic emotional skill, one that in a former day was called will.” Daniel Goleman 1998 Working with emotional intelligence p. 285 Emotional intelligence
  15. 15. Happiness needs to seen in an historical and personal context The discrediting of ‘public service’ over the past 3 decades takes its toll Develop ‘resilience’ Resist ‘pathologisation’: ie. it’s not you Summary “I actually attack the concept of happiness … the idea that everything we do is part of the pursuit of happiness seems to me a really dangerous idea and has led to a contemporary disease in Western society, which is fear of sadness.” Hugh Mackay: Australian social commentator “Nobody has on their grave they were a great efficient managers - it’s about relationships with people, with family, with friends … there’s nothing about work, ever.” (words of manager in) Jackie Ford and David Collinson 2011 ‘In search of the perfect manager?’ p. 266

×