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AllDayDevOps ZAP automation in CI

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Slides from my http://www.alldaydevops.com talk on
Security Scanning using OWASP ZAP in a CI pipeline

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AllDayDevOps ZAP automation in CI

  1. 1. November 15, 2016
  2. 2. The OWASP Foundation http://www.owasp.org Copyright © The OWASP Foundation Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the OWASP License. Security Scanning using OWASP ZAP in a CI pipeline Simon Bennetts OWASP ZAP Project Lead Mozilla Cloud Security Team psiinon@gmail.com AllDayDevOps.com 2016
  3. 3. The Plan • Who is this for? • What are we trying to solve? • What can you get out of this? • Introduction to ZAP • Where to start • Where to go from there 3
  4. 4. Who is this for? • Developers • QA • Operations • Security • Consultants • (Managers) • Whoever is involved in automation ;) 4
  5. 5. What are we trying to solve? • Find security issues as early as possible • Integration into the devops pipeline • Finding all of the possible vulnerabilities • Putting pentesters out of a job :P 5 What are we not trying to solve?
  6. 6. What can you get out of this? • A way to quickly evaluate your apps • Options for more thorough scanning • An introduction to the ZAP API 6
  7. 7. 7 ZAP Introduction • An easy to use webapp pentest tool • Completely free and open source • OWASP Flagship project • Ideal for beginners • But also used by professionals • Ideal for devs, esp. for automated security tests • Included in all major security distributions • ToolsWatch.org Top Security Tool of 2015 • Not a silver bullet!
  8. 8. 8 ZAP Features • Swing based UI for desktop mode • Comprehensive API for daemon mode • Plugin architecture (add-ons) • Online ‘marketplace’ (all free:) • Release, beta and alpha quality add-ons • Traditional and ajax spiders • Passive and active scanning • Highly configurable, eg scan policies • Highly scriptable
  9. 9. Some ZAP use cases • Point and shoot – the Quick Start tab • Proxying via ZAP, and then scanning • Manual pentesting • Automated security regression tests • Debugging • Part of a larger security program 9
  10. 10. ZAP Install Options • Windows .exe • Linux .tar.gz • Mac OS .dmg • Docker Images • owasp/zap2docker-stable • owasp/zap2docker-weekly • Distros like Kali 10
  11. 11. Where to start? • The Baseline scan • Completely safe • Runs quickly (1-2 minutes?) • Can be easily integrated into CI/CD • Easy to get started – just required the target: • Very configurable if needed 11 • docker pull owasp/zap2docker-weekly • docker run -t owasp/zap2docker-weekly zap-baseline.py -t https://www.example.com
  12. 12. Baseline scan • Uses docker (the only dependency) • Time limited spider of target (default 1 min) • Just passive scanning • By default warns on all issues • Can change to ignore, info or fail • Can include any ZAP cmdline option • Can ignore any url regex for any rule 12
  13. 13. Baseline scan - issues • All release and beta passive scan rules, eg • Missing / incorrect security headers • Cookie problems • Information / error disclosure • Missing CSRF tokens •... • Can optionally include alpha pscan rules 13
  14. 14. Baseline scan – usage 14 Usage: zap-baseline.py -t <target> [options] -t target target URL including the protocol, eg https://www Options: -c config_file config file to use to INFO, IGNORE or FAIL warnin -u config_url URL of config file to use to INFO, IGNORE or FAIL -g gen_file generate default config file (all rules set to WA -m mins the number of minutes to spider for (default 1) -r report_html file to write the full ZAP HTML report -w report_md file to write the full ZAP Wiki (Markdown) report -x report_xml file to write the full ZAP XML report -a include the alpha passive scan rules as well -d show debug messages -i default rules not in the config file to INFO -j use the Ajax spider in addition to the traditiona -l level minimum level to show: PASS, IGNORE, INFO, WARN o -s short output format - dont show PASSes or example -z zap_options ZAP command line options e.g. -z "-config aaa=bbb
  15. 15. Baseline scan – output 16 ./zap-baseline.py -t https://www.example.com 3 URLs PASS: Cookie No HttpOnly Flag [10010] PASS: Cookie Without Secure Flag [10011] PASS: Password Autocomplete in Browser [10012] <snip> WARN: Incomplete or No Cache-control and Pragma HTTP Header Set [10015] https://www.example.com WARN: Web Browser XSS Protection Not Enabled [10016] x 3 https://www.example.com https://www.example.com/robots.txt https://www.example.com/sitemap.xml WARN: X-Frame-Options Header Not Set [10020] x 1 https://www.example.com WARN: X-Content-Type-Options Header Missing [10021] x 1 https://www.example.com FAIL: 0 WARN: 4 INFO: 0 IGNORE: 0 PASS: 22
  16. 16. Baseline scan – conf file • Use -g option to generate, -c or -u to use 17 # zap-baseline rule configuration file # Change WARN to IGNORE to ignore rule or FAIL to fail if rule matches # Only the rule identifiers are used - the names are just for info # You can add your own messages to each rule by appending them after a 10010 WARN(Cookie No HttpOnly Flag) 10011 WARN(Cookie Without Secure Flag) 10012 WARN(Password Autocomplete in Browser) 10015 WARN(Incomplete or No Cache-control and Pragma HTTP Header Set) 10016 WARN(Web Browser XSS Protection Not Enabled) 10017 WARN(Cross-Domain JavaScript Source File Inclusion) 10019 WARN(Content-Type Header Missing) 10020 WARN(X-Frame-Options Header Scanner) 10021 WARN(X-Content-Type-Options Header Missing) 10023 WARN(Information Disclosure - Debug Error Messages) 10024 WARN(Information Disclosure - Sensitive Information in URL) 10025 WARN(Information Disclosure - Sensitive Information in HTTP Refer
  17. 17. Where next? • Mass Baseline scan • Provides a simple dashboard • Shows the detailed results • Shows the per service history 18
  18. 18. Mass Baseline scan • Part of the community-scripts repo: zaproxy/community-scripts/api/mass-baseline 19
  19. 19. Full Scans • Packaged options: • Cmdline quick scan • Jenkins plugin • Sdlc-integration scripts • Daemon mode + API • (ZAP as a Service – in development) 20
  20. 20. Cmdline Quick Scan 21 ./zap.sh -cmd -quickurl http://example.com/ -quickprogress • Spidering • Active scanning • [====================] 100% • Attack complete • <?xml version="1.0"?><OWASPZAPReport version="2.5.0" generated="Tue, 4 Oct 2016 09:31:53"> • <site name="http://example.com" ...
  21. 21. Old Jenkins plugin • https://github.com/jenkinsci/zaproxy-plugin • Developed by 3rd party • No longer maintained • Doesn’t work well with latest versions of ZAP 22
  22. 22. New Jenkins plugin
  23. 23. New Jenkins plugin • Fork and rewrite of the old plugin • Maintained by the ZAP core team • Supports authentication, scan policies, Jira integration • To be released very soon - hopefully next week!) • Will be at https://github.com/jenkinsci/zap-plugin • Will be featured on the ZAP blog zaproxy.blogspot.com • Will work best with weekly releases (until ZAP 2.6.0 is released) 24
  24. 24. Sdlc integration scripts • Part of the community-scripts repo: zaproxy/community-scripts/api/sdlc-integration • Spidering, passive and active scanning • Supports authentication • Supports JIRA integration • Linux only, requires some file editing 25
  25. 25. Useful cmdline options • Turn off db recovery (speeds things up) -config database.recoverylog=false • Update all add-ons -addonupdate • Install a non default add-on -addoninstall addonname • Setting the API key -config api.key=j8WdOEq8dhwWE24VGDsreP • Disable API key in a safe environment -config api.disablekey=true 26
  26. 26. Using the ZAP API • Intro to the API • Exploring • Scanning • Reporting • Authenticating • Tuning 27
  27. 27. Intro to the API • RESTish – ok, only uses GET requests http(s)://zap/<format>/<component>/ <operation>/<op name>[/?<params>] • Maps closely to the UI / code • Theres a v basic (but complete) web UI for it • And clients in various langs: Java, Python, Node JS, .Net, PHP, Go … • Clients are generated from the code 28
  28. 28. API UI – Top Level
  29. 29. API Pro Tips 1. Experiment with the Desktop UI 2. Export configs from the UI (contexts, scan policies..) 3. Then reproduce using the API UI 4. Finally convert to a script 30
  30. 30. Intro – Python API • Install from pypi: pip install python-owasp-zap-v2.4 • In your script: from zapv2 import ZAPv2 zap = ZAPv2() zap = ZAPv2(proxies={ 'http': 'http://localhost:8080', 'https': 'http://localhost:8090'}) 31 h from zapv2 import ZAPv2 zap = ZAPv2() zap = ZAPv2(proxies={ 'http': 'http://localhost:8090', 'https': 'http://localhost:8090'}) • zap.urlopen(target) • pip install python-owasp-zap-v2.4
  31. 31. Exploring • Proxy Regression / Unit tests • Traditional Spider (crawler) • Ajax Spider (browsers) • Spider SOAP definition (via alpha add-on) • Import ModSecurity2 logs (via alpha add-on) 32
  32. 32. Spider Desktop and API UIs
  33. 33. Spider Desktop and API UIs
  34. 34. Exploring – Trad Spider 35 h zap.spider.scan(target) • time.sleep(5) • while int(zap.spider.status()) < 100: • print ('Spider progress %: ' + zap.spider.status()) • time.sleep(5) • print ('Spider completed')
  35. 35. Exploring – Ajax Spider 36 h zap.ajaxSpider.scan(target) • time.sleep(5) • while zap.ajaxSpider.status() == 'running': • print ('Ajax Spider # results: ' + zap.ajaxSpider.number_of_results()) • time.sleep(5) • print ('Ajax Spider completed')
  36. 36. Scanning – Passive Scan 37 while int(zap.pscan.records_to_scan()) > 0: • print ('Pscan records : ' + zap.pscan.records_to_scan()) • time.sleep(5) • print ('Pscan completed') h • Passive scanning happens automatically when proxying • To tell when its finished:
  37. 37. Scanning – Active Scan 38 h zap.ascan.scan(target) • time.sleep(5) • while int(zap.ascan.status()) < 100: • print ('Ascan progress %: ' + zap.ascan.status()) • time.sleep(5) • print ('Ascan completed')
  38. 38. Reporting – HTML + XML 39 h # HTML Report • with open ('report.html', 'w') as f: f.write(zap.core.htmlreport()) # XML Report • with open ('report.xml', 'w') as f: f.write(zap.core.xmlreport())
  39. 39. Reporting – all alert data 40 h # Use paging for lots of alerts • offset = 0; page = 5000 • alerts = zap.core.alerts('', offset, page) • while len(alerts) > 0: • for alert in alerts: • # Do whatever you want with alert • offset += page • alerts = zap.core.alerts('', offset, page)
  40. 40. And dont forget... 41 h # Your work here is done... • zap.core.shutdown()
  41. 41. Authenticating • Authentication can be hard :( • Simple form based auth should be ok • Authentication scripts should be able to handle anything • But if you have complex SSO or equiv you may want a simpler option in your test env • Pro Top: use the UI to set authentication up! 42
  42. 42. Tuning - speed • Spider time limits • Data driven content • Technology • Active scan • Scan rules • Input vectors • Attack strength 43
  43. 43. Tuning - feedback • Active scan stats • Response stats • Authentication stats (alpha add-on) • Statsd support 44
  44. 44. Tuning - accuracy • Attack thresholds • Rule configuration (post 2.5.0) – Forms that dont need CSRF tokens – Increase timing attacks from 5 seconds 45
  45. 45. And if you need help... • ZAP Getting Started Guide • ZAP User Guide • ZAP User Group • ZAP Developer Group • ZAP wiki, includes links to videos • irc.mozilla.com #websectools 46
  46. 46. Talk Summary • Use the baseline scan for a quick security overview • Use the mass baseline to create a dashboard • Use the new Jenkins plugin for more depth • Use the ZAP API for even more control • If you need help, just ask :) 47
  47. 47. November 15, 2016
  48. 48. November 15, 2016

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