Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Collecting the Cloud, Feeding the CrowdPeter SamisAssociate Curator,Interpretive MediaSan Francisco Museumof Modern Art   ...
―Knowledge… has broken out of its physicalconfines (the pages of a book or the mind of a person)and now exists in a hyperc...
As if to confirm…
―For the coming generation, knowinglooks less like capturing truths in booksthan engaging in never-settled networksof disc...
―the smartest person in the room isno longer a person but the roomitself.                             if the room —       ...
That‘s what‘s known as Curating.                       Both in the museum…
And on the Web. Here‘s an early example.
Harrell Fletcher & Miranda July‘sLearning to Love you More[In 2002, before the rise of the blogosphere and Web2.0 platform...
This was the last assignment.
The site became a book, which you can buy at Amazon…(or at the SFMOMA MuseumStore!)
When SFMOMA acquired this collective artwork, we gotmore than just a website. Here‘s a glimpse…
[And here are some of the drawings andphotos a year later, archivally matted andstored.]
Social practice art = relational aesthetics
[Lets listen to the artists themselves give alittle background on the project and theunforeseen sequels that ended up bein...
An example of piggybacking:Assignment #12:Get a temporary tattoo of one of Morgan Rozackys neighbors.
And in the gallery:
[In 2010, as part of the exhibition The More ThingsChange, SFMOMA invited Bay Area artist StephanieSyjuco to develop an in...
And in the gallery:
Collecting works like this leads us to…      [Technology issues are now Intimately interwoven      with curatorial and aes...
And internally, across departments:Team Media:• Curators• Conservators• Registrars• Media technicians• IP managersAddressi...
Some of those issues are technical:think of the ever more rapidly evolvingmedia format and hardware standards. [From the j...
―The content has a longer lifespan thanthe technology does.‖                                    Photo: SMcGarnigleBesides,...
Piggybacking —>Linking w/ an attribution                    —> Pirating        In the world of copyright, where does      ...
On the Web itself, a lively debateensues.
The Internet is inherently aCULTURE OF LINKING:“the emerging sense of the author asmoderator — someone able to marshal„the...
―It‘s all about LINK LOVE."   –Maria Popova
Here‘s a flaming retort: is CURATING justa grandiose term for SHARING?
Continuing with Maria for a minute: ―IP, as a term, is inherently flawed and anachronistic in its focus on ownership (―pro...
Personal  reflection  writ large  as social  sharing…  with  artwork as  an impetus.[Inspired by the currentRineke Dijkstr...
Or at a simpler level:  [Whether it‘s through a Pin or a tweet, pictures of our artworks  seep into the Web through many p...
Where does that lead a museum thatwants to be…
It‘s clear that our visitors—both on-siteand online—want access to our material      • For creative use      • For persona...
Are the artworks* ours to give?Are they ours to withhold?                                  *or rather their representations
For whom do we hold these works inpublic trust?• For the artists?• For their descendants/Estates?• For the visitors who pa...
Thank you.
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Collecting the Cloud, Feeding the Crowd

1,646 views

Published on

Presentation given at ALI-ABA Legal Issues in Museum Administration conference, San Francisco, March 19, 2012.

Published in: Art & Photos
  • 100% tattoo fade - Get rid of that old memory today, Remove your tattoo for just $47. ●●● https://bit.ly/2TliUmG
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

Collecting the Cloud, Feeding the Crowd

  1. 1. Collecting the Cloud, Feeding the CrowdPeter SamisAssociate Curator,Interpretive MediaSan Francisco Museumof Modern Art Jochen Gerz, The Gift (detail)ALI-ABA 2012 San Francisco March 19, 2012
  2. 2. ―Knowledge… has broken out of its physicalconfines (the pages of a book or the mind of a person)and now exists in a hyperconnected onlinestate.‖ –David Weinberger via REBECCA J. ROSEN
  3. 3. As if to confirm…
  4. 4. ―For the coming generation, knowinglooks less like capturing truths in booksthan engaging in never-settled networksof discussion and argument.‖
  5. 5. ―the smartest person in the room isno longer a person but the roomitself. if the room — ―this also means that the network — is stupid, we ourselves will be made more stupid.‖―our task is to learn how to build smart rooms.‖ –Rebecca Rosen in dialogue with David Weinberger
  6. 6. That‘s what‘s known as Curating. Both in the museum…
  7. 7. And on the Web. Here‘s an early example.
  8. 8. Harrell Fletcher & Miranda July‘sLearning to Love you More[In 2002, before the rise of the blogosphere and Web2.0 platforms, Harrell Fletcher and Miranda Julylaunched a collaborative online project that invitedpeople all over the world to perform and respond tocreative assignments: a kind of socialized ‗art school.‘Participants followed the artists‘ simple instructionsand submitted documentation or ―reports‖ on theirassignments to the project‘s website.]
  9. 9. This was the last assignment.
  10. 10. The site became a book, which you can buy at Amazon…(or at the SFMOMA MuseumStore!)
  11. 11. When SFMOMA acquired this collective artwork, we gotmore than just a website. Here‘s a glimpse…
  12. 12. [And here are some of the drawings andphotos a year later, archivally matted andstored.]
  13. 13. Social practice art = relational aesthetics
  14. 14. [Lets listen to the artists themselves give alittle background on the project and theunforeseen sequels that ended up beingcross-woven among participants from allover the world. This anticipates the socialweb, which we will discuss in more detaillater.]
  15. 15. An example of piggybacking:Assignment #12:Get a temporary tattoo of one of Morgan Rozackys neighbors.
  16. 16. And in the gallery:
  17. 17. [In 2010, as part of the exhibition The More ThingsChange, SFMOMA invited Bay Area artist StephanieSyjuco to develop an in-gallery presentation ofLearning to Love You More. Rather than making acuratorial selection of a few assignments, Syjucoopted to translate Fletcher and July‘s online artworkinto a different time-based medium—a digitalslideshow in which all contributions for all theassignments were presented: two assignments a day,projected side by side.]
  18. 18. And in the gallery:
  19. 19. Collecting works like this leads us to… [Technology issues are now Intimately interwoven with curatorial and aesthetic issues.]
  20. 20. And internally, across departments:Team Media:• Curators• Conservators• Registrars• Media technicians• IP managersAddressing time-based and digital art issues… since 1996!
  21. 21. Some of those issues are technical:think of the ever more rapidly evolvingmedia format and hardware standards. [From the job description for the New Media Conservation Administrator]
  22. 22. ―The content has a longer lifespan thanthe technology does.‖ Photo: SMcGarnigleBesides, what‘s the shelf-life of a standard these days?
  23. 23. Piggybacking —>Linking w/ an attribution —> Pirating In the world of copyright, where does building on each other‘s work become uncool? Or in a world where everybody is borrowing sentence fragments from everyone else, be they visual or linguistic, what‘s a copyright lawyer to do?
  24. 24. On the Web itself, a lively debateensues.
  25. 25. The Internet is inherently aCULTURE OF LINKING:“the emerging sense of the author asmoderator — someone able to marshal„the wisdom of the network.‟” –Bob Stein via Maria Popova, aka @brainpicker
  26. 26. ―It‘s all about LINK LOVE." –Maria Popova
  27. 27. Here‘s a flaming retort: is CURATING justa grandiose term for SHARING?
  28. 28. Continuing with Maria for a minute: ―IP, as a term, is inherently flawed and anachronistic in its focus on ownership (―property‖) in an age of sharing and open access…"
  29. 29. Personal reflection writ large as social sharing… with artwork as an impetus.[Inspired by the currentRineke Dijkstra show]
  30. 30. Or at a simpler level: [Whether it‘s through a Pin or a tweet, pictures of our artworks seep into the Web through many ports.]
  31. 31. Where does that lead a museum thatwants to be…
  32. 32. It‘s clear that our visitors—both on-siteand online—want access to our material • For creative use • For personal reflection • For projection into the public sphere as part of their own life and identity
  33. 33. Are the artworks* ours to give?Are they ours to withhold? *or rather their representations
  34. 34. For whom do we hold these works inpublic trust?• For the artists?• For their descendants/Estates?• For the visitors who pay at the gate?• For the visitors who find us for free through a link on the Web?• For the Future?Just who is the Future—and where are they today?
  35. 35. Thank you.

×