PE_eLearning Presentation 2009

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  • Culture and contextAssess context, culture/local market, diverse learnersGlobal context, organisational contextEase and simplicity, usableEmpathy for usersRelevance and purpose“Simplicity is treading a line: knowing what to keep and what to throw away....it comes across as magic when it works, because none of the complexity is transferred to users...only simplicity (http://bokardo.com/archives/five-principles-to-design-by/).” In my opinion, if theUsers: F2F experience, transition to online/webinar format, time limited, multiroled.Collaborate and corroborateDesignThis process would involve some of the steps of the empathic instructional design model of observation, reflection and analysis and brainstorming for solutions (Nischani 2002). Generating ideas, fostering educational process, change management.Change in pedagogiProvide structure, tools and tips that act as guidelines but allow the learners to use, adapt and customise as required for their culture and context. Provide supports or scaffolds so overtime the trainers are up and running themselves.Oliver and Herrington propose three key aspects to their framework for online learner settings which is (i) tasks, (ii) resources and (ii) supports. An important part of their framework and my design process is building in the learning supports and scaffolds, which help to build knowledge so that overtime as the knowledge construction occurs the learner will not need the scaffolds and can stand alone. Whilst there is a focus on supports there is also a strong role for the teacher as a coach, facilitator or mentor. ‘Many frameworks have been developed to describe ideal forms of support for online learning environment and in each case there is a strong argument made for an active and involved teacher (Oliver and Herrington 2001 p.2).’ EmpowerCreate and cultivatePilot, implement, testMarket by market, region by regionMost comfortable to least comfortableEvolveDirection of flexibility and learner-empowerment if it is to allow instructional design to keep up with technological and institutional changes.” Promotion of learner autonomy means increased responsibility for the student, which, if it is to succeed, requires a strong framework of support and guidance for the student from the outset (in Oliver and Herrington 2001 p.13)”. The goal of this training portal is the beginning of a move in this direction, more flexibility, more learner autonomy and more support and guidance. Primary role of the teacher is to create collaborative, challenging and supportive learning environments whereby the teachers’ role as a coach is highly situation-specific and is related to problems that arise as students attempt to integrate skills and knowledge (in Oliver and Herrington 2001). In my opinion in the dynamic global workplace today you cannot oversimplify, learners need to be given opportunities to learn in complex environments and deal with problems and make decisions.Continuous and communityOngoingEvaluationCommunityDevelop skillsThe final element proposes the importance of the continuous iterative process of design and learning as well as the need for a community of learners to share, maintain, support and continue to evolve as learners in the workplace today. With the changing nature of the Company, our customers and technology globally a community will assist with constructing new knowledge and skills to adapt and meet the needs of the current workplace. Overtime the community will influence all aspects of the design process.
  • Culture and contextAssess context, culture/local market, diverse learnersGlobal context, organisational contextEase and simplicity, usableEmpathy for usersRelevance and purpose“Simplicity is treading a line: knowing what to keep and what to throw away....it comes across as magic when it works, because none of the complexity is transferred to users...only simplicity (http://bokardo.com/archives/five-principles-to-design-by/).” In my opinion, if theUsers: F2F experience, transition to online/webinar format, time limited, multiroled.Collaborate and corroborateDesignThis process would involve some of the steps of the empathic instructional design model of observation, reflection and analysis and brainstorming for solutions (Nischani 2002). Generating ideas, fostering educational process, change management.Change in pedagogiProvide structure, tools and tips that act as guidelines but allow the learners to use, adapt and customise as required for their culture and context. Provide supports or scaffolds so overtime the trainers are up and running themselves.Oliver and Herrington propose three key aspects to their framework for online learner settings which is (i) tasks, (ii) resources and (ii) supports. An important part of their framework and my design process is building in the learning supports and scaffolds, which help to build knowledge so that overtime as the knowledge construction occurs the learner will not need the scaffolds and can stand alone. Whilst there is a focus on supports there is also a strong role for the teacher as a coach, facilitator or mentor. ‘Many frameworks have been developed to describe ideal forms of support for online learning environment and in each case there is a strong argument made for an active and involved teacher (Oliver and Herrington 2001 p.2).’ EmpowerCreate and cultivatePilot, implement, testMarket by market, region by regionMost comfortable to least comfortableEvolveDirection of flexibility and learner-empowerment if it is to allow instructional design to keep up with technological and institutional changes.” Promotion of learner autonomy means increased responsibility for the student, which, if it is to succeed, requires a strong framework of support and guidance for the student from the outset (in Oliver and Herrington 2001 p.13)”. The goal of this training portal is the beginning of a move in this direction, more flexibility, more learner autonomy and more support and guidance. Primary role of the teacher is to create collaborative, challenging and supportive learning environments whereby the teachers’ role as a coach is highly situation-specific and is related to problems that arise as students attempt to integrate skills and knowledge (in Oliver and Herrington 2001). In my opinion in the dynamic global workplace today you cannot oversimplify, learners need to be given opportunities to learn in complex environments and deal with problems and make decisions.Continuous and communityOngoingEvaluationCommunityDevelop skillsThe final element proposes the importance of the continuous iterative process of design and learning as well as the need for a community of learners to share, maintain, support and continue to evolve as learners in the workplace today. With the changing nature of the Company, our customers and technology globally a community will assist with constructing new knowledge and skills to adapt and meet the needs of the current workplace. Overtime the community will influence all aspects of the design process.
  • Start with activities or experiences and then selecting online tools to support this.Plan or PreparePromotional email templates for professional invitationsTraining needs online surveyPresent or DeliverWebinar tool itselfOnline preso tipsAgendas and scriptsReviewOnline feedback survey reportsFollow up email of recorded webinarRecorded webinar to review performanceSelf-evaluate formShift from focus on delivery to focus on preparing and reviewing. Especially the reviewing.The Kolb Learning Cycle of moving through the learning process. Empowering them to manage.
  • Drum as a graphic..what does this look like?The drum symbolises the concept of culture and different global cultures, my design has a global context.In addition, when I train trainers I believe they all have their own style of training, own strengths and this should be supported and encouraged so that they ‘dance to the beat of their own drum.’ The circle around the drum in the graphic represents a community drum circle. The graphic combines a sense of simplicity, fun and creativity into my learning.Tradition components of ADDIE model of analyse, design, development , like project management steps... Ensure cover of key steps1. Culture and context (assess/analyse)2. Collaborate and corroborate (design/supports)3. Create and cultivate (pilot/implement/test)4. Continuous and community (evaluation/ongoing/knowledgesharing/building)Other words that came to mind were ease, empathy, engage, experience, empower and evolve. The three key elements of my e-learning design model reflect some of the traditional approaches of instructional design or step-by-step project management approaches, while the words reflect my values in relation to learning theories and philosophies. The fourth element highlights the continuous nature of design and learning and the need for a global community in the ever changing global work environment. My e-learning model is an attempt to combine the traditional models of steps with learning concepts and processes. As with any design model it is only a representation of what might happen in practice. There will always be discrepancies between theories or models and practice or implementation.
  • PE_eLearning Presentation 2009

    1. 1. Introduction<br />What is my elearning project?<br />Why have I chosen this project?<br />How is it being implemented (designed)? <br />Key insights and issues<br />References and influences<br />What do you think? QandA?<br />
    2. 2. What is the eLearning project?<br />New web solutions for pilot and launch<br />Global training framework of print, online and instructor-led options<br />Supporting Infomedia trainers globally with Train the Trainer sessions and toolkit<br />Adding webinars to the framework<br />Learners have training experience/ multi-role<br />Adapting current Train the Trainer materials to support online Webinars<br />
    3. 3. Why this elearning project?<br />Support web solution<br />Costs and Time<br />Green/environmental innovation/our planet<br />Vast reach, remote, diverse<br />Short delivery timeframes<br />Maintenance/changing solutions<br />Recording of live session<br />
    4. 4. How is it being implemented (design)?<br />Blended learning approach, a hybrid approach<br />Combination of online learning and offline activities<br />Online (ii)<br />Education Portal: learning environment<br />Products: Product training materials <br />Support: Train the Trainer materials<br />Community: Forum<br />Online tools to support : Prepare, Deliver, Review<br />Online surveys, webinars, recordings, reporting, CRM, forum<br />
    5. 5. eLearning Design Project - Online<br />Conceptual resources<br />
    6. 6. Learning environment<br />Tasks<br />Resources<br />Supports<br />
    7. 7. eLearning Design Project - Online<br />Performance supports-<br />Trainer Toolkit<br />Community<br />
    8. 8. eLearning Design Project - Online<br />
    9. 9. How is it being implemented (design)?<br />Offline<br />Practicing and conducting live webinars<br />Authentic tasks and activities<br />Experiential, hands-on<br />At the time of need, templates, checklists, guidelines<br />Active Teacher support and expertise<br />Online tools support offline activities<br />“Technology appears to have great potential to support student performance of authentic tasks and their resultant learning.” Woo & Herrington<br />
    10. 10. How is it being implemented (design)?<br />Customisation for local market/culture<br />Translation/ Localisation of web solution<br />Translation/Localisation of training solutions<br />Ability to customise for local market<br />
    11. 11. Learning environment<br />Tasks<br />Resources<br />Supports<br />
    12. 12. Learning<br />
    13. 13. Components<br />Products<br />Support<br />Community<br />
    14. 14.
    15. 15. Insights and issues<br />Staged implementation region by region, most ready to least ready<br />Collaboration is key, ongoing educational process<br />Change management strategies inbuilt<br />Complex, changing work environment, real world context essential<br />Focus is on:<br /> -supports/scaffolds…integrating into day to day work<br /> -building in reflection and learning opportunities, self-direction, self-regulation <br /> -shift from centralised to decentralised<br /> -shifting from delivery only to prepare and review more<br /> -intercultural awareness and acceptance of different ways<br />
    16. 16. Insights and issues<br />Learner readiness, self-efficacy and time<br /> ‘Students must be challenged with authentic tasks that drive the need to use, transform, apply, and reinterpret that information.’ (WandH)<br />Organisational readiness, technological readiness<br />Decentralising knowledge, power<br />Community engagement on forum<br />Cultural diversity, global<br />Reference group<br />
    17. 17. Insights and issues<br />Changing pedagogical models<br />Behaviourism, cognitivism, experiential, constructivism, social constructivism, ‘The use of authentic tasks is derived from social constructivist principles of locating learning in the context of reality.’ (WandH)<br />Shift in pedagogy models to include socio-cultural aspects (Belisle C)<br />Building intercultural awareness and acceptance of different ways<br />An active approach to learning is not sufficient, if there is not, in the pedagogical environment that is set up, the elements that will trigger awareness of one’s actions, of the personal maturing that is happening, and of the resulting ‘distanciation’ with the knowledge building activity that constructivism involves. That is why learning, even within a constructivist understanding of learning, needs to be organized by teaching. <br />Teachers to select kinds of tasks .... The challenge for teachers today is to enter into a constructivist approach to learning and deploy a socio-cultural understanding of their activity. All these aspects can be said to refer to Vygosky socio-cultural theory of learning.<br />A traditional view of the learning process, - learning is a tedious solitary and linear process, based on identifying deficiencies and weaknesses in students, and on information transfer and reproduction – can be easily opposed to an emerging view – learning as an active social process, based on strengthening students abilities, interests and culture, an integrative, contextualized and versatile process.<br />New pedagogical model is needed., this model will obviously result from reflective practice and an awareness of what is knowledge and what is learning.<br />The work on intercultural competence...... clearly expands the pedagogical domain beyond intellectual goals to include cultural, affective and personal development. In so doing it brings about an inevitable shift of focus from the teacher to the learner, for the learner needs to become the pilot of the cultural, affective and personal transformative actions.<br />
    18. 18. Key references and influences<br />Bokardo Social Web Design http://bokardo.com/archives/five-principles-to-design-by/<br />Clark, D An Attack on ISDwww.nwlink.com/~donclark/history_isd/attack.html<br />Nichani, M. (2002). Empathic Instructional Design. elearningpost. Available: ww.elearningpost.com/articles/archives/empathic_instructional_design/<br />Oliver, R. Herrington, J (2001) Online Learning Design for Dummies: Professional Development Strategies for Beginning Online Designers<br />Siemens, G (2002) Instructional Design in Elearning. Elearningspace – everything elearning. www.elearningspace.org/Articles/InstructionalDesign.htm<br />Teo, S. and Lange, H. (2008). Learning Design in the Online Environment – Challenging the Norms. Proceedings of Distance Learning and the Internet Conference 2008, Waseda University, Toykyo, Japan, pp 71-77.<br />
    19. 19. Key references and influences<br />Belisle, C. (2008). eLearning and Intercultural dimensions of learning theories and teaching models. e-Learning Papers. Available: http://www.elearningeuropa.info/files/media/media14903.pdf<br />Godwin, L., and Kaplan, S. (2008). Designing ee-learning environments: Lessons from an online workshop. Innovate 4(4). Available: http://www.innovateonline.info/index.php?view=article&id=489<br />Krishnan L, and Venkatesh R (2004), Experience-Enabling Design: An approach to elearning design, India and Singapore Available: http://www.elearningpost.com/articles/archives/experience_enabling_design_an_approach_to_elearning_design/<br />Singh, H. (2003). Building Effective Blended Learning Programs. Educational Technology, 43(6):51-54. Available: http://asianvu.com/digital-library/elearning/blended-learning-by_Singh.pdf<br />Woo, Y., Herrington, J., Agostinho, S. and Reeves, T. (2007). Implementing Authentic Tasks in Web-Based Learning Environments. EDUCAUSE QUARTERLY, No 3, pp 36-43. Available: http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/EQM0735.pdf<br />
    20. 20.
    21. 21. Q and A<br />Any tips for the design model?<br />Any tips for design project?<br />Any tips for community?<br />Discussion?<br />

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