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re-member, v.2<br />Pronunciation:  Brit. /ˌriːˈmɛmbə/ , U.S. /riˈmɛmbər/<br />Etymology:  < re- prefix + member n., after...
‘no, no … this is not how my story ended’<br />Unlike ‘essences  [which] bear to their instantiations the same relation wh...
The Prince and the Memory Multiplicity<br />
To  describe  a  player’s  learning  process Laurel introduced the ‘flying wedge’ that clarifies the gradual  development ...
In Assassin's Creed, The protagonist, through his memory, recreates the body and the actions of his ancestor, Altair – as ...
A Bergsonian Remembering<br />Time is not internal to consciousness; nor are memories stored within the brain.<br />It is ...
The Virtual<br />Is a fully real  entity where  all divergent realisations of multiplicity are valid.<br />Recollections o...
The modified ‘flying wedge’ (from Nitsche), when turned over clockwise resembles Bergson’s famous cone with which he repre...
The Collective-Assassin-Memory<br />
how memory affects the action in  videogames …how it influences the identity-formation  <br />Affect: (1) The delay or int...
re-member, v.2<br />Pronunciation:  Brit. /ˌriːˈmɛmbə/ , U.S. /riˈmɛmbər/<br />Etymology:  < re- prefix + member n., after...
re-member, v.2<br />Pronunciation:  Brit. /ˌriːˈmɛmbə/ , U.S. /riˈmɛmbər/<br />Etymology:  < re- prefix + member n., after...
Perception of recollection:<br />We are aware that we have remembered<br />The virtual<br />Actualised recollection-image<...
During the déjà vu<br />But what really made Assassin's Creed II a tremendous video game experience for me was that it's t...
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Re membering and dismembering: Memory and the (Re)Creation of Identities in Videogames

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This is my presentation for the Philosophy of Computer Games Conference 2011. The accompanying paper is available at: http://gameconference2011.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/re-membering-and-dismembering-final.pdf.

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Re membering and dismembering: Memory and the (Re)Creation of Identities in Videogames

  1. 1. re-member, v.2<br />Pronunciation:  Brit. /ˌriːˈmɛmbə/ , U.S. /riˈmɛmbər/<br />Etymology:  < re- prefix + member n., after dismember v.<br />trans.Categories »<br /> <br /> 1. To put together again, reverse the dismembering of. rare.<br />memory, n.<br />Pronunciation:  Brit. /ˈmɛm(ə)ri/ , U.S. /ˈmɛm(ə)ri/<br />Etymology:  < Anglo-Norman memoire, memore, memorie, memoir, memor, memour, Old French memorie... <br /> I. Senses relating to the action or process of commemorating, recollecting, or remembering.<br />Re-membering<br />+<br />Dismembering<br />Memory and the (Re)Creation of Identities in Videogames<br />remember, v.1<br />Pronunciation:  Brit. /rᵻˈmɛmbə/ , U.S. /rəˈmɛmbər/ , /riˈmɛmbər/<br />Etymology:  < Anglo-Norman remembrier, remembrir, remenbrer, Anglo-Norman and Middle French ...<br /> I. Senses in which the idea of an external stimulus to memory or thought is weak. * Reflexive, passive, and impersonal constructions mainly corresponding to senses in branch I.** 1. trans. (refl.). To recollect; to think about, reflect on (in some uses without the idea of recollection).<br />member, n. and adj.<br />Pronunciation:  Brit. /ˈmɛmbə/ , U.S. /ˈmɛmbər/<br />Forms:  ME membir, ME membree, ME membur, ME membyre, ME menbre, ME–15 membyr...<br />Etymology:  < Anglo-Norman and Old French membre (c1100; by c...)<br /> A. n. I. Senses relating to a part of a living body or organism.<br />
  2. 2. ‘no, no … this is not how my story ended’<br />Unlike ‘essences [which] bear to their instantiations the same relation which a model has to its copies, that is, a relation of greater or lesser resemblance, multiplicities imply divergent realisations which bear no similarity to them’<br /> (DeLanda 2002: 28)<br />The ‘understanding of games […] is essentially linear, and one of a progressive movement in time and space towards a finite ending where the interruptions of avatar death are inconvenient moments that must be quickly erased from the consciousness of the player [...] is not the dominant experience of play’<br />(Atkins 2007, p. 244). <br />These inconvenient moments might be considered parallel memories of the same moment in time that comprise of totally different outcomes, <br />E.g players might have multiple memories of what happened to them when they were attacked by a certain guard in Sands of Time.<br />
  3. 3. The Prince and the Memory Multiplicity<br />
  4. 4. To describe a player’s learning process Laurel introduced the ‘flying wedge’ that clarifies the gradual development of the player behaviour from the possible, via the probable towards the necessary. The above outlined time reversal in Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time skews this wedge becausethanks to the added knowledge players do not return to a former state (a) but instead know more about the probable behaviour. Along the timeline of Laurel’s wedge their entry point moves forward towards (a’), (a’’), et al.<br />(Nitsche 2007)<br />
  5. 5. In Assassin's Creed, The protagonist, through his memory, recreates the body and the actions of his ancestor, Altair – as explained above, he 're-members' Altair. In a rather nice touch, Ubisoft illustrates this in the moments where, in an intentional glitch, the player's memory struggles to recreate Altair's image, which breaks up from time to time into a mesh of DNA patterns and nucleotide chains. <br />
  6. 6. A Bergsonian Remembering<br />Time is not internal to consciousness; nor are memories stored within the brain.<br />It is we who move between memories of different levels and intensities in our acts of recollection.<br />Bergson’s conception of multiplicity implies a range of concurrent pasts and presents.<br />
  7. 7. The Virtual<br />Is a fully real entity where all divergent realisations of multiplicity are valid.<br />Recollections occur here. Within a mesh of interconnected pasts.. <br />‘Little by little like a condensing cloud’ recollection passes from the virtual to the actual. <br />Recollections intermingle with perceptions and are ‘perceived’; they might also be ignored and become automatic and unperceived memories. <br />
  8. 8.
  9. 9. The modified ‘flying wedge’ (from Nitsche), when turned over clockwise resembles Bergson’s famous cone with which he represents memory.<br />
  10. 10. The Collective-Assassin-Memory<br />
  11. 11. how memory affects the action in videogames …how it influences the identity-formation <br />Affect: (1) The delay or interruption in the body’s immediate reaction allows conscious perception to arise […] (2) The body waits before acting; it has the time to remember. In light of the delay opened up by affect, memories can be actualized and inserted into the present to help determine the future course of action .The way in which affect delays and prefigures action defines my body’s hold on time – its access to memory and the openness of its future. To feel is to no longer play out the past automatically, but to imagine and remember it. (Al-Saji 2004, p. 221)<br />As the player passes through the affective state into active, the act of remembering can also be seen as a ‘re-membering’ or the reconstruction of the body through memory. Altair, the Prince of Persia, the amnesiac protagonist of S.T.A.L.K.E.R. Despite his complaints about the story not being as he remembers it, what the Prince of Persia does not realise is that each time he protests he has actually been ‘re-membered’ or recreated by the player’s memory. <br />
  12. 12. re-member, v.2<br />Pronunciation:  Brit. /ˌriːˈmɛmbə/ , U.S. /riˈmɛmbər/<br />Etymology:  < re- prefix + member n., after dismember v.<br />trans.Categories »<br /> <br /> 1. To put together again, reverse the dismembering of. rare.<br />memory, n.<br />Pronunciation:  Brit. /ˈmɛm(ə)ri/ , U.S. /ˈmɛm(ə)ri/<br />Etymology:  < Anglo-Norman memoire, memore, memorie, memoir, memor, memour, Old French memorie... <br /> I. Senses relating to the action or process of commemorating, recollecting, or remembering.<br />Re-membering<br />+<br />Dismembering<br />Memory and the (Re)Creation of Identities in Videogames<br />remember, v.1<br />Pronunciation:  Brit. /rᵻˈmɛmbə/ , U.S. /rəˈmɛmbər/ , /riˈmɛmbər/<br />Etymology:  < Anglo-Norman remembrier, remembrir, remenbrer, Anglo-Norman and Middle French ...<br /> I. Senses in which the idea of an external stimulus to memory or thought is weak. * Reflexive, passive, and impersonal constructions mainly corresponding to senses in branch I.** 1. trans. (refl.). To recollect; to think about, reflect on (in some uses without the idea of recollection).<br />member, n. and adj.<br />Pronunciation:  Brit. /ˈmɛmbə/ , U.S. /ˈmɛmbər/<br />Forms:  ME membir, ME membree, ME membur, ME membyre, ME menbre, ME–15 membyr...<br />Etymology:  < Anglo-Norman and Old French membre (c1100; by c...)<br /> A. n. I. Senses relating to a part of a living body or organism.<br />
  13. 13. re-member, v.2<br />Pronunciation:  Brit. /ˌriːˈmɛmbə/ , U.S. /riˈmɛmbər/<br />Etymology:  < re- prefix + member n., after dismember v.<br />trans.Categories »<br /> <br /> 1. To put together again, reverse the dismembering of. rare.<br />remember, v.1<br />Pronunciation:  Brit. /rᵻˈmɛmbə/ , U.S. /rəˈmɛmbər/ , /riˈmɛmbər/<br />Etymology:  < Anglo-Norman remembrier, remembrir, remenbrer, Anglo-Norman and Middle French ...<br /> I. Senses in which the idea of an external stimulus to memory or thought is weak. * Reflexive, passive, and impersonal constructions mainly corresponding to senses in branch I.** 1. trans. (refl.). To recollect; to think about, reflect on (in some uses without the idea of recollection).<br />Thank you<br />Souvik Mukherjee, De Montfort University, UK prosperosmaze@gmail.com<br />http://readinggamesandplayingbooks.blogspot.com/<br />
  14. 14.
  15. 15. Perception of recollection:<br />We are aware that we have remembered<br />The virtual<br />Actualised recollection-image<br />at present<br />affect<br />Various influencing factors<br />The whole past<br />Direct motor action or ‘habit memory’<br />Motor-action<br />Memory and Recollection: (An Attempt at) A Schematic Diagram<br />
  16. 16. During the déjà vu<br />But what really made Assassin's Creed II a tremendous video game experience for me was that it's the first video game I've ever played set in a location that I'm intimately familiar with. I really only have a tourist's knowledge of the Manhattan of Spider-Man 2, but I lived in Florence (or just outside it, here) for over a month, and so my knowledge of that city is pretty good. It's resisted change enough over the past few centuries that when I walk the streets of the virtual Renaissance Florence as Ezio in Assassin's Creed II, I get the weirdest feeling of deja vu. The recreation is so good that it's difficult to separate my knowledge of the real city from the in-game map. I might be playing the game, find myself at a spot I visited in real life, and be reminded of what I actually did there. Or I might be painfully aware of what they failed to include in their recreation (the Baptistery of San Giovanni, for Pete's sake). My experience of Assassin's Creed II is much more personal than any other game I've ever played. Every time I sit down to play it is a walk down memory lane.<br />- Blog posting, ‘Videogames as Culture / Form’ blog, http://videogameform.blogspot.com/2011/03/deja-vu.html<br />

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