www.pronutritionist.net
A Paleolithic diet is more satiating per
calorie than a Mediterranean-like diet
in individuals wit...
Page 2
Pronutritionist’s background
• Paleolithic diet, also referred to as the caveman diet and
Stone Age diet, is based ...
Methods (1/2)
• controlled dietary intervention trial
• n = 29 men
– IHD (ischemic heart disease) patients with impaired
g...
Methods (2/2)
• Food intake was followed by a four day weighed
food record
• In addition, participants recorded their subj...
Results (1/4)
• The Paleolithic group were as satiated as the
Mediterranean group but consumed less energy
per day
– Paleo...
Results (2/4): Dietary intake
Paleolithic diet Mediterranean diet
Energy intake (kcal) 1388 1823
Protein intake
g 92 88
E ...
Results (3/4)
• Absolute intake of protein did not differ between
groups, but relative intake of protein (E%) was
higher i...
Results (4/4): relative change of leptin
• Leptin decreased by 31% in the Paleolithic group
and by 18% in the Mediterranea...
Pronutritionist’s discussion
• ruokavalioiden miellyttävyys, tätä olisi hyvä tutkia
myös?
• interventiojakso lyhyt, kuinka...
Pronutritionist’s discussion
• ruokavalioiden miellyttävyys, tätä olisi hyvä tutkia
myös?
• interventiojakso lyhyt, kuinka...
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Paleolithic diet jonsson lindeberg

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In this small clinical trial, Swedish researchers showed that satiety is improved while on paleolithic diet. Head to head study against Mediterranean diet.

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Paleolithic diet jonsson lindeberg

  1. 1. www.pronutritionist.net A Paleolithic diet is more satiating per calorie than a Mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischemic heart disease Jönsson T et al. Nutr Metab 2010; 7: 85 (e-pub ahead of print) Page 1 Jonsson T et al. Nutr Metab 2010; 7: 85 (e-pub ahead of print)
  2. 2. Page 2 Pronutritionist’s background • Paleolithic diet, also referred to as the caveman diet and Stone Age diet, is based on the presumed diet of our hunter-gatherer ancestors – Paleolithic diet consists mainly of lean meats, seafood, vegetables, fruits and nuts – Paleolithic diet excludes grains, legumes, dairy products, salt, refined sugar and processed oils – However, there are many different types of Paleolithic diets • Health effects of a Paleolithic diet are not well known • Lindeberg et al. found improvement of glucose tolerance in ischemic heart disease (IHD) patients with impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes who followed a Paleolithic diet (as compared to a Mediterranean-like diet) – participants following Paleolithic diet also had lower dietary energy intake , mikä herätti kiinnostuksen tutkia myös kylläisyysvaikutuksia Jonsson T et al. Nutr Metab 2010; 7: 85 (e-pub ahead of print) www.pronutritionist.net
  3. 3. Methods (1/2) • controlled dietary intervention trial • n = 29 men – IHD (ischemic heart disease) patients with impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes – waist circumference > 94 cm • Participants were randomized to a Paleolithic diet or a Mediterranean diet – duration 12 weeks • Paleolithic diet was based on – lean meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, root vegetables, eggs and nuts • Mediterranean diet was based on – whole grains, low-fat dairy products, potatoes, legumes, vegetables, fruit, fish, oils and margarines Page 3 Jonsson T et al. Nutr Metab 2010; 7: 85 (e-pub ahead of print) www.pronutritionist.net
  4. 4. Methods (2/2) • Food intake was followed by a four day weighed food record • In addition, participants recorded their subjective rating of satiety  Satiety Quotients were calculated – SQ = satiety rating pre-eating episode – satiety rating post-eating episode / food intake of eating episode • Leptin and leptin receptor was measured at – baseline – after 6 and 12 weeks • Free leptin index was calculated as the ratio leptin/leptin receptor • GL and GI for the two diets were calculated www.pronutritionist.netJonsson T et al. Nutr Metab 2010; 7: 85 (e-pub ahead of print) Page 4
  5. 5. Results (1/4) • The Paleolithic group were as satiated as the Mediterranean group but consumed less energy per day – Paleolithic 1388 kcal/day vs. Mediterranean 1823 kcal/day (p=0.04) • There was no difference between groups in length of time between meals or number of meals per day • Quotients of mean change in satiety during meal and mean consumed energy from food and drink were higher in the Paleolithic group (p=0.03) • There was a strong trend for greater Satiety Quotient for energy in the Paleolithic group (p=0.057) www.pronutritionist.netJonsson T et al. Nutr Metab 2010; 7: 85 (e-pub ahead of print) Page 5
  6. 6. Results (2/4): Dietary intake Paleolithic diet Mediterranean diet Energy intake (kcal) 1388 1823 Protein intake g 92 88 E % 27 20 Carbohydrate intake g 129 211 E % 39 47 Fat intake g 46 59 E % 28 28 SAFA (E %) 8.4 9.4 Fiber (g) 22 27 Glycemic load (g) 63 110 www.pronutritionist.netJonsson T et al. Nutr Metab 2010; 7: 85 (e-pub ahead of print) Page 6
  7. 7. Results (3/4) • Absolute intake of protein did not differ between groups, but relative intake of protein (E%) was higher in the Paleolithic group (27±6 E% vs. 20±3 E%, p=0.002) – However, there was no correlation between relative protein intake and measures of satiety per calorie. • The Paleolithic group consumed less carbohydrates and consumed a diet with lower glycemic load and less saturated fatty acids www.pronutritionist.netJonsson T et al. Nutr Metab 2010; 7: 85 (e-pub ahead of print) Page 7
  8. 8. Results (4/4): relative change of leptin • Leptin decreased by 31% in the Paleolithic group and by 18% in the Mediterranean group with a trend for greater relative decrease of leptin in the Paleolithic group (p = 0.04) • Relative changes in leptin and changes in weight and waist circumference correlated significantly in the Paleolithic group (p<0.001), but not in the Mediterranean group www.pronutritionist.netJonsson T et al. Nutr Metab 2010; 7: 85 (e-pub ahead of print) Page 8
  9. 9. Pronutritionist’s discussion • ruokavalioiden miellyttävyys, tätä olisi hyvä tutkia myös? • interventiojakso lyhyt, kuinka helppoa paleodieettiä on pitemmän päälle noudattaa? Entä pitkäaikaisvaikutukset? Hinta? • oliko energiamäärä pienempi paleodieetillä sen vuoksi, että ruokaa ei ollut miellyttävä syödä (kylläisyys epämiellyttävään ruokaan tulee nopeampaa)? • Suolan määrässä ruokavalioiden välillä huomattavan suuri ero (Paleolithic 3.8 g, Mediterranean 8 g) www.pronutritionist.netJonsson T et al. Nutr Metab 2010; 7: 85 (e-pub ahead of print) Page 9
  10. 10. Pronutritionist’s discussion • ruokavalioiden miellyttävyys, tätä olisi hyvä tutkia myös? • interventiojakso lyhyt, kuinka helppoa paleodieettiä on pitemmän päälle noudattaa? Entä pitkäaikaisvaikutukset? Hinta? • oliko energiamäärä pienempi paleodieetillä sen vuoksi, että ruokaa ei ollut miellyttävä syödä (kylläisyys epämiellyttävään ruokaan tulee nopeampaa)? • Suolan määrässä ruokavalioiden välillä huomattavan suuri ero (Paleolithic 3.8 g, Mediterranean 8 g) www.pronutritionist.netJonsson T et al. Nutr Metab 2010; 7: 85 (e-pub ahead of print) Page 9

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