Provider workshop 11.14.12

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  • Remindthe Providers that today’s training workshop is dedicated to Phase 4. All other questions or concerns should be placed on the appropriate Parking Lot Newsprint.
  • The objectives of the Intervening Variables (IV) and Contributing Factors (CF) overview include:A brief review of the IVs and CFs, their meaning, purpose, and relationship to the goals An example of how IVs and CFs interact and impact the overall goal(s)
  • Ask: How many of you completed the IV and CF tutorial on Lunch Box?The tutorial provides more detail and several examples. Today’s review is just to make sure everyone is on the same page regarding these terms.
  • As we can see in this figure, from SPF-SIG - the Intervening variables are broader issues. The contributing factors help to explain WHY something is a problem…the circumstances/factors that cause certain behaviors occur. For example, if Pricing is the IV, then happy hour specials may be one CF that explains WHY binge drinking [consumption] occurs which in turn leads to alcohol related crashes and fatalities [consequence]The term contributing factor is used for the actual condition that a prevention strategy will directly try to affect. Note: Identifying contributing factors will guide the selection of your evidence-based strategies. Remember the contributing factor describes why something is a problem—not the problem itself.
  • In our GASPS context the IVs for each goal has been pre-selected and approved for use in the GASPS process. For goal 1, we can see here that 4 IV were identified.The focus of Phase 4 is to actually identify the contributing factors that demonstrate a high need across the different communities surveyed.
  • You will need these documents/tools in order to complete the data analysis process. As you can see, documents/tools 1-8 are aligned with each step in the process. Documents 9-11 are for reference purposes. All of the tools can be accessed through the GASPS website at ga-sps.org located in the Phase 4 link. The data output tables reflect the answers for each survey question per community. Output tables were sent directly to each provider via link. The data analysis worksheet instructions are a step-by-step guide for conducting data entryThe data analysis worksheet is an Excel spreadsheet that will be used to enter the survey data for each communityThe observational data analysis tools refer to the Phase 2 document used to review the Law Enforcement Survey, Alcohol Promotion, and Retail Establishment AnalysisThe prioritization worksheets for Goals 1, 2, and 3 will assist in prioritizing intervening variables and contributing factors by high need communitiesThe Provider Goal Selection Justification Worksheet will be used to justify the selection of the Provider Goal For reference, the list of intervening variables and contributing factors sheet along with the GASPS indicators and measures document have also been provided.The last reference document, the Phase 4 Tools Guidance Document describes the purpose and requirements for each tool.
  • First let me say that all data output tables will not be used during this process because some are for evaluation purposes only The first and second page of your data output tables are an overall view of indicator questions used for evaluation purposes. This is an example of pages that will not be used in this process. The number of responses per question varies because it is dependent on the number of individuals that answered. This is why the count is important (will go into further detail later).
  • “Standard Output Table” in general is what majority of the tables look like. For each question you have the responses by age group, gender, race/ethnicity. “Exceptions to the Rule” depict the data in a different format. For example, for the first question: Over the entire lifetime, what was your age the first time you used alcohol? The data output table gives the age at which they began alcohol use by gender and the following table is by race/ethnicity. Again, there are only a few tables that are the “exception”
  • Here is an example of what the Data Analysis Worksheet looks like. The worksheet shows the goal, intervening variable, associated contributing factor/survey question (blue arrow), and demographic breakdown for each question. You will list each community in cell A . The footnote (highlighted in purple) will tell you what survey responses were added/combined to do the calculation for the count and percent Count: The total number of “yes” responses to the question from a community. Percentage: The total number of “yes” responses from a community expressed as a percentage of the total number of respondents from that community. Colored Cells: The colors assigned to a particular cell is based on the level of prevalence. *low prevalence *moderate prevalence *high prevalence
  • Now I will go into a detailed overview of the Phase 4 process – step x step.
  • If you are a tree lover like me, this is an example of how you can do the calculations in the data output tables since they are in PDF. Otherwise, please feel free to print the data output tables and use the “pencil and paper” method. The left side of the screen, I used the “highlight” feature (arrow) in Adobe to color the two responses I will add together in yellow The right side of the screen, I used the “sticky note” feature (arrow) in Adobe to add the count and percent for each age group. This will help with data entry later. Do this for ALL calculations and notations before you start data entry. This will help the data entry process to go smoothly. I will now show you on the screen
  • We are going to use the Contributing Factor – Provision to Minors to demonstrate how to make calculations using the data output tables. When we look at the data analysis worksheet instructions and the worksheet footnote we see that to calculate the count and percent we need to combine responses “sort of easy” and “very easy”.Get your data output tables and do the following: Locate the correct question (circled in blue) make sure it matches the worksheet contributing factor Locate the two responses (circled in red) “sort of easy” and “very easy” Combine the count and percent for each demographic 9 -12 age group count is 0 and 0%13-17 age group count is 65 and 61.4%18-20 age group count is 32 and 68%Use the Sticky note feature to store your calculations. When you get to Step 3, you will then input these counts and percents in the worksheet.
  • Now you will do the same for gender – male and female The gender data output tables follow the age group data output tables Locate the two responses (circled in red) “sort of easy” and “very easy” Combine the count and percent for each gender Male group count is 53 and 66.3% Female group count is 44 and 57.9%Use the Sticky note feature to store your calculations. When you get to Step 3, you will then input these counts and percents in the worksheet.
  • When we say “note key findings” we are asking you to look at the qualitative questions, for example here “During the past 30 days, how did you usually get the alcohol you drank?” You would note the most common responses per community.In this example, you may conclude in this particular community that in the past 30 days, a small number of 18-20 year olds reported that they accessed alcohol either by stealing it or getting it from someone else, to include shoulder tapping. Nothing noted for 9-17. Repeat this process when “note key findings” is indicated throughout the Data Analysis Worksheet tabs.
  • In Step 2 you will list each community in cell A. As seen in the example, the communities are labeled A, B, etc. However, for your purposes, please use the real community names in the data analysis worksheet that you will submit to your RPS.The cells will be green because of the background formulas (will discuss further in the next slide)
  • What I am depicting here is how I took the calculations from the data output tables and entered them into the corresponding cells in the worksheetAs you can see, you have the communities listed in Column A. The contributing factor – provision to minors Q16 (CS 9-17) and Q21 (CS 18-25). The count and percent were entered for the three age groups 9-12, 13-17, and 18-20 The count and percent were entered for the genderYou will do this process for each community for this contributing factor
  • This is what the worksheet looks like after we entered all the calculations/data for each community for this contributing factor.Let me explain the various colors represented in the cells. The cells automatically determines the low, moderate, or high thus changing the color of the cell to indicate the level of prevalence. Pay attention to the color in both the count and percent cell. For example in Community A the 18-20 age group the count is yellow indicating moderate and the percent is green indicating low.
  • For the column labeled “Examine the data available and identify the key findings for each community and across all communities”, look at your data output tables and the data collected through the observational tools used during the Needs Assessment Phase 2 and list key findings for each community and common themes/issues/problems across all your communities. Please note that you could also add any contributing factor you identified during your needs assessment process not included in the survey (e.g. moonshine showed as a common contributing factor in a few communities).
  • This is what the columns look like in the worksheet. You will enter key findings for each community in the respective boxes. It is strongly recommended that you complete all your calculations and noting key findings in your data output tables before entering the data in the Needs Assessment Data Analysis Worksheet to reduce margin of error. You may also consider having more than one person doing the calculations and compare results for validation and quality control purposes.
  • (This should take about 10 mins) At this time, I will demonstrate Step 3 on the big screen
  • Begin listing the communities that demonstrate a high need for each contributing factor. This will be the initial step in looking at which communities have like contributing factors and populations that may allow you to cluster them by high need areas.After 1st bullet:For example, a particular contributing factor may score high (pink) based on only 4 people while other contributing factors may score moderate (yellow) based on 30 people. In this case, the contributing factor that scored moderate (with 30 people) could be considered an issue of concern due to the higher count. Nevertheless, please note that the primary focus should be on the contributing factors that scored high (pink). 2nd bullet:For qualitative questions, look at your key finding columns. Identify communities that indicate certain commonalities, issues, themes for each of the goals. Do this process with all communities for each of the goals. This means, you will do this process for tabs labeled Goal 1, Goal 2, Goal 3 and 26+ populations. *****Please note you may end up with multiple scenarios for which communities have common issues. This is the first step in looking at which contributing factors you could address and what strategies you could implement in multiple communities.
  • In this example for Goal 1: Reduce the early onset of alcohol use among 9-20 year olds, intervening variable Social Availability, contributing factor “provision to minors” question Q16 (CS9-17) and Q21 (CS18-25) – if you wanted to get some beer, wine, or hard liquor how easy would it be for you to get it? Based on the high (pink), middle (yellow), and low (green) color coding: We see that communities A, B, and E demonstrate a high percentage of 13-17 year olds and 18-20 year olds believe it is easy to obtain alcohol Based on the data, this is considered an area of concern with scores of 4 and justifiable 2’s based on the number of respondents (count column) You will do this process for each contributing factor in each Goal area
  • For social availability provision to minors: “during the past 30 days how did you get the alcohol that you drank?”***Someone other than a family member gave it to me***You will do this process for each qualitative answer in each goal area
  • Once you have examined each contributing factor in each goal area, you will meet with CPAW members and use the Intervening Variable and Contributing Factor Prioritization Worksheet to identify which contributing factors and associated intervening variables impact your communities the most for each goal. This process has three parts.
  • Part 1 – Justification and Impact Scores Using the Goal 1 tab from the data analysis worksheet, identify the communities that demonstrate a high need for each contributing factor and answer each of the summary questions. The high need groups may differ for each contributing factor. Next, on a scale of 0-7, give an Impact Score for each contributing factor. Place the name of each community that received a score of 4 or justifiable 2 in the data analysis worksheet next to the contributing factor In the box to the right you will place the justification for the impact score given There are empty boxes that you may enter other contributing factors identified in the data collection process (i.e. moonshine for some communities) This process will occur for each contributing factor in each tab
  • Part 2 In the first column, write in the high need community scenario identified for each contributing factor. In the second column, write the score your CPAW assigned to indicate the impact that this contributing factor has on the goal. Using your ‘Sort’ feature in Word, you will re-organize the chart, first by High Need Communities and second by Score. This will allow you to see similar High Need Community scenarios together. (Optional) - DEMO In the spaces allocated for Other, you are allowed to use other contributing factors that may have emerged as high need throughout the data collection process (i.e. moonshine).
  • Part 3 – Ranking the High Need Scenarios In the space provided, write in the High Need Community Scenarios you identified (i.e. A,B,E). For this step, refer to the chart above. List the contributing factor number (CF#) and the intervening variable abbreviation that is associated with the High Need scenario and has assigned an Impact Score of 4 or higher. If a contributing factor has been assigned an Impact Score below 4, the CF will not be carried over to this section. Based on the Impact Score, rank from highest to lowest the contributing factors that scored 4 or higher. A rank of 1 indicates a greater priority based on the data.
  • Let’s take a look at this example, which best meets the criteria?
  • The first example is excluded because this high need scenario has 2 IL CF and only 1 other IV/CF; can only have up to 1 IL CFThe second example is excluded because while SA and SCN appear to be a high need across all of the communities, it does not meet the criteria of having two IV with two CF associated with each.The fourth example is excluded because this high need scenario only has 1 IV and 2 associated CFsThe third example best meets the criteria becauseThere are at least 2 IV that have the required number of associated CFFour out of the 6 communities surveyed demonstrated a high need for these IV/CF
  • Fill out a Prioritization Worksheet for your 26+ population. You will be asked to discuss your findings regarding this population in the Needs Assessment report. This information will help to inform the selection of strategies in Step 3.
  • Review Part 3 of the IV & CF Prioritization Worksheets for each goal.In the charts provided below, write in the High Need Communities Scenario(s) that met the Provider Goal Selection criteria.If there were more than one scenario that met the criteria, indicate each in the space below.If none of the scenarios from a particular goal met the criteria, indicate not applicable in the space providedDiscuss with your CPAW the different scenarios for each goal. In the spaces below, provide a justification for your selection. You are encouraged to use your secondary data and other related data gathered to justify your selection.
  • In cases where a community or some communities are considered low, moderate or outliers, you may still have the opportunity to engage the CPAW members or partners from those communities and make an impact by expanding your environmental strategies to these communitiesPlease be mindful that the Phase 4 process and tools are intended to provide you with some guidelines in determining which Intervening variables, contributing factors, and communities were found to be most affected the GASPS goals
  • You have just received an detailed overview of how the Needs Assessment Phase 4 Data Analysis Process is intended to work. You will be working more with the data output table this afternoon in order to further your understanding and increase your familiarity with the process
  • Provider workshop 11.14.12

    1. 1. NEEDS ASSESSMENT PHASE 4 DATA ANALYSIS WORKSHOP Presented by OPSP/DBHDDNovember 14-16, Supported By RPS/GSU Coaching Team UGA Evaluation Team2012
    2. 2. WELCOME
    3. 3. Parking Lot
    4. 4. TRAINING WORKSHOPAT-A-GLANCE• Brief Review of Intervening Variables (IV) & Contributing Factors (CF)• Introduction of Phase 4 Tools• Detailed Overview of Phase 4 Process• Interactive Tabletop Exercises
    5. 5. BRIEF REVIEW OF IV & CF
    6. 6. Intervening Variable & ContributingFactorsIntervening variables are constructs that have been identified as being strongly relatedto and influential in the occurrence and magnitude of substance use problems andconsequences.Contributing factors are the local situations that make the targeted behaviorsespecially problematic within your community.Communities utilize needs assessment data to determine what conditions in theircommunity contribute to the consumption which in turn contributes to differentconsequences.
    7. 7. IVs and CFs in the big pictureReproduced from GA SPF SIG Assessment Binder – Outcome-based Prevention Model
    8. 8. + IVs in the big pictureIVs and CFs in GASPSprocess
    9. 9. INTRODUCTION OF PHASE 4TOOLS
    10. 10. Data Analysis Process ToolsYou will need the following tools for completing this process:1. Your Data Output Tables – (Step 1)2. Needs Assessment Data Analysis Worksheet Instructions – (Step 1 & Step 3)3. The Needs Assessment Data Analysis Worksheet – (Step 2- Step 4)4. The Observational Data Analysis Tools – (Step 3)5. Goal 1 – IV & CF Prioritization Worksheet – (Step 5)6. Goal 2- IV & CF Prioritization Worksheet – (Step 5)7. Goal 3 - IV & CF Prioritization Worksheet – (Step 5)8. Provider Goal Selection Justification Worksheet (Step 6)9. List of Intervening Variables and Contributing Factors Sheet – (Reference document)10. GASPS Indicators and Measures Document – (Reference document)
    11. 11. Data Output Tables
    12. 12. Data Output TablesStandard Output Table Exception to the Rule
    13. 13. Phase 4 Data AnalysisWorksheet
    14. 14. DETAILED OVERVIEW OFPHASE 4 PROCESS
    15. 15. ObjectivesThe objectives of the Needs Assessment Phase 4 Process are: To use the Data Analysis worksheet to interpret the community-level data To use the Data Analysis worksheet to identify a cluster of high need areas based on data. To identify contributing factors and associated intervening variables based on data. To use the IV & CF Prioritization worksheets to hone in on specific factors To use data gathered throughout the assessment phase to justify the Provider Goal.
    16. 16. STEP ONEMake Calculations And Note KeyFindings Using Data Output TablesTools Needed:• Data Output Tables
    17. 17. Making Calculations
    18. 18. Making Calculations using Data OutputTables Add the count and Add the count and Add the count and percent in for percent for “Very percent for “Very “Very Easy” and Easy” and “Sort of Easy” and “Sort of “Sort of Easy” in Easy” in the “13- Easy” in the “18- the “9-12” column 17” column and 20” column and and enter the enter the totals in enter the totals in totals in the the worksheet. the worksheet. worksheet.
    19. 19. Making Calculations using Data OutputTables Add the count and Add the count and percent for “Very percent for “Very Easy” and “Sort of Easy” and “Sort of Easy” in the Easy” in the “Male” column and “Female” column enter the totals in and enter the the worksheet totals in the worksheet.
    20. 20. Note Key Findings
    21. 21. Calculation & Data Entry Tips Use the Find feature to search for questions in the data output tables and to find the matching cells in the Data Analysis Worksheet. Have two people adding the numbers to ensure accuracy. Use the Sticky note feature to keep save your calculations and key findings notes. Complete all your calculations and note key findings in your data output tables before entering the data in the Needs Assessment Data Analysis Worksheet to reduce margin of error. Have one person enter the data.
    22. 22. STEPS TWO & THREEListing Communities & Data EntryTools Needed:• Needs Assessment Data Analysis Worksheet• Observational Data Analysis Tools•Needs Assessment Data Analysis WorksheetInstructions
    23. 23. Listing Communities
    24. 24. Entering Data Into WorksheetData Output Table Data Analysis Worksheet
    25. 25. Entering Data into Worksheet
    26. 26. Entering Data into Worksheet(Qualitative)
    27. 27. Note Key Findings
    28. 28. Showcase
    29. 29. STEP 4Identifying High Need CommunitiesTools Needed:• Needs Assessment Data Analysis Worksheet
    30. 30. Identifying High NeedCommunities Examine contributing factors across all your communities for each goal, pay particular attention to cells shaded red and/or yellow Examine your key finding columns Identify communities that share certain commonalities, issues, themes for each of the contributing factor
    31. 31. 1. Examine contributing factor
    32. 32. 2. Examine your key findingcolumns
    33. 33. STEP 5Prioritization of Contributing FactorsTools Needed:• Needs Assessment Data Analysis Worksheet• Goal 1 – IV & CF Prioritization Worksheet• Goal 2 – IV & CF Prioritization Worksheet• Goal 3 – IV & CF Prioritization Worksheet•26+ - IV & CF Prioritization Worksheet (*)
    34. 34. Part 1: Justification and ImpactScores
    35. 35. Part 2: Prioritization of ContributingFactors CF # Contributing Factors and Intervening Variables High Need Score Communities 1. Initial Use – Individual Level (IL) 2. Past Month Use – Individual Level (IL) 3. Provision to Minors – Social Availability (SA) 4. Availability of Unsupervised Places to Drink – Social Availability (SA) 5. Lack of Parental Monitoring of Alcohol Supply in the Home – Social Availability (SA) 6. Shoulder Tapping – Social Availability (SA) 7. Youth’s Perception Peer Norms – Social and Community Norms (SCN) 8. Youth’s Perception on Parental Acceptance – Social and Community Norms (SCN) 9. Cultural Acceptability – Social and Community Norms (SCN) 10. Parental Involvement – Social and Community Norms (SCN) 11. Low Perceived Risk of Arrest or Penalties – Perception of Risk (*) (LPR) 12. Other: (also indicate associated IV) 13. Other: (also indicate associated IV)
    36. 36. Part 3: Prioritization of ContributingFactors High Need Communities High Need Communities High Need Communities High Need Communities Scenario 1 Scenario 2 Scenario 3 Scenario 4 CF # IV Impact Rank CF # IV Impact Rank CF # IV Impact Rank CF # IV Impact Rank Score Score Score Score
    37. 37. General Criteria The High Need Community Scenario that meets the following criteria may be considered for Provider Goal Selection: A maximum of three (3) intervening variables:  Up to one individual level contributing factor (optional)  At least two (2) intervening variables that has two (2) contributing factors associated, unless otherwise noted (*). This means at least two (2) IVs other than Individual Level.  The ranked contributing factors and intervening variables demonstrates a high need for the majority of the communities surveyed.
    38. 38. Which Best Meets The Criteria?
    39. 39. Which Best Meets The Criteria?
    40. 40. 26+ Prioritization Worksheet Only parts 1 and 2 are required for this worksheet. Prepare to summarize the findings in your Needs Assessment Report. This information will be useful when developing your strategic plan and implementing your strategies.
    41. 41. STEP 6Provider Goal Selection JustificationTools Needed:•Goal 1 – IV & CF Prioritization Worksheet•Goal 2 – IV & CF Prioritization Worksheet•Goal 3 – IV & CF Prioritization Worksheet•Provider Goal Selection Justification Worksheet
    42. 42. Provider Goal SelectionJustification Worksheet #2 #3
    43. 43. Things to Consider Low, moderate or outlier communities Tools are intended to provide you with some guidelines
    44. 44. Wrap-up Overview of the process Provided an explanation of key terms, documents, and tools needed Provided examples of crucial steps in the process
    45. 45. INTERACTIVE TABLETOPACTIVITIESPutting your understanding to work
    46. 46. NEXT STEPS• 11/27/12 – All-Providers Fuze Call @ 11a to go over the Phase 5 Needs Assessment Template and the Timeline• 11/28/12 – Open TA Call – 10:00a - 2:00p• 11/29/12 – Open TA Call – 6:00p – 9:00p• Beginning week of 12/3/12 – Providers who reach Steps 5 and 6 can start scheduling one-on-one TA/check-in session with their RPS/GSU coaching team• Please utilize the ECCO system

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