Georgia Strategic Prevention System  (GASPS) <ul><li>GASPS Structure  </li></ul><ul><li>Coalition Building  </li></ul><ul>...
Training Objectives <ul><li>Participants will be able to list the three primary structural  requirements for building and ...
Welcome <ul><li>Quick review of our Goto Meeting platform </li></ul><ul><li>Share your name, provider name, and geographic...
Change… <ul><li>It is important to recognize and preserve unique qualities while finding new ways for systems to work toge...
The purpose of the GASPS is… <ul><li>To build prevention infrastructure and capacity in the state of Georgia at the state ...
GASPS Vision & Mission Vision Healthy fully realized Georgians living in communities free of the debilitating effects of s...
GASPS State Selected Goals <ul><ul><li>Reduce the early onset of alcohol use among 9-20 year olds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><...
 
State Advisory Steering Committee (ASC) State Prevention Alliance Workgroup (SPAW) TA & Support Services Data Structure | ...
GASPS Three Structural Supports  <ul><li>Regional Prevention Alliance Workgroup  (RPAW) supports prevention-related activi...
Overview of the RPAW <ul><li>RPAW – Regional Prevention Alliance Workgroup </li></ul><ul><li>The RPAW will be comprised of...
Overview of the  CPAW <ul><li>CPAW –  Community  Prevention Alliance Workgroup Functions </li></ul><ul><li>Functions of th...
<ul><li>Assemble Workgroup elements </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Epidemiology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning & Operation </l...
CPAW Operations <ul><li>The Project Coordinator (PC) will serve as the Team Lead / coordinator of their respective CPAW. <...
Why is a CPAW so important <ul><li>SAMHA has raised the bar around building local capacity to understand local data, imple...
CPAW Meeting Information <ul><li>The CPAW can be comprised of three individuals that represent the three expertise element...
CPAW Workgroup Expertise Elements <ul><li>CPAW consists of three elements: </li></ul><ul><li>1.  Epidemiological (Epi) exp...
Epidemiological (Epi) SPF-STEP  EPI element function  1. Needs Assessment  Participate in data collection, review and anal...
Planning & Operations <ul><li>Each provider should have staff implementing services as a member of this workgroup.  </li><...
Evaluation & Sustainability <ul><li>Each provider should have staff implementing services as a member of this workgroup. <...
Critical Questions Can CPAWS be combined if sharing the same community?  Providers  can share information and human resour...
Critical Questions Can coalitions share the same community?  Yes , and they should. However… All SPF step products and pro...
Critical Questions If a provider has multiple contracts in multiple regions, should the provider have multiple CPAWS? It i...
Providers link to a Coalition  <ul><li>Join an exiting ATOD focused coalition  </li></ul><ul><li>Join a local coalition an...
Describe your current relationship to a local coalition <ul><li>Participatory </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative Projects  </...
Coalition Sector Representation <ul><li>Sector Requirements (9 or 12) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Youth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><...
Questions??? <ul><li>Any questions related to CPAW and/or the coalition link? </li></ul>
Coalitions <ul><li>How can one word have so many different meanings? </li></ul>
Running a Successful Coalition is a Complex Task <ul><li>Like organizations, coalitions have missions and goals for their ...
Coalition Success <ul><li>Everything that happens in coalition work occurs because people and organizations  lend  their t...
3 Core Elements of building a successful coalition <ul><li>CADCA Best Practices </li></ul><ul><li>* Building Coalition Mem...
Building Coalition Membership <ul><li>What does strong membership look like? </li></ul><ul><li>1.  Figuring out who the co...
Coalition Membership <ul><li>Note – There is no single  “ right ”  mix of stakeholders for every community.  </li></ul><ul...
Steps to Strong Membership <ul><li>Step 1 – Plan to have the right people. </li></ul><ul><li>Step 2 – Plan to build a stro...
Step 1 – Plan to have the right people  <ul><li>Affirm a coalition-wide commitment to cultural competence. </li></ul><ul><...
Step 2 – Plan to build a strong infrastructure. <ul><li>Think about the skills, knowledge and resources your coalition wil...
Step 3 – Assess levels of interest and needed involvement. <ul><li>Examine your existing and potential partners lists and ...
Step 4 – Recruit and Engage <ul><li>The best way to approach recruitment is simple, personal, face-to-face invitation.  </...
Coalition Organization <ul><li>Key components of coalition organization… </li></ul><ul><li>Clear roles and organizational ...
Coalition Organization <ul><li>Coalitions should avoid creating new service-providing organizations.  Instead they should ...
Coalition Organization  Key Component 1: Clear roles and organizational structure <ul><li>Create written  “ job descriptio...
Coalition Organization  Key Component 2: Good meeting and communication habits <ul><li>Hold meetings regularly.  </li></ul...
Coalition Organization  Key Component 3: Appropriate legal and financial structures and practices. <ul><li>Regardless of w...
Coalition Leadership <ul><li>The  “ Inner Game ”  of Coalition Work </li></ul><ul><li>Coalitions involve harnessing the kn...
Coalition Leadership <ul><li>Leadership must address the following concerns at multiple levels. </li></ul><ul><li>The inte...
Aspects of Leadership Coalition leaders fulfill multiple aspects and multiple roles. <ul><li>Leader as facilitator. </li><...
Shared Leadership <ul><li>Shared leadership allows everyone to work to their own strengths which is more personally reward...
Steps to Facilitate Shared Leadership <ul><li>Identify the strengths and preferred roles among leaders and potential leade...
Activity <ul><li>Worksheet </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What person ’ s in your community might fit the required expertise el...
Questions
<ul><li>Assemble Workgroup elements </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Epidemiology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning & Operation </l...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Georgia strategic prevention system (gasps) coalition draft v4 mb-m

4,457 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,457
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3,538
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
17
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Do we need to break out these steps or just review on one slide?
  • Break these out and do a slide for each?
  • Inner game Outer game
  • Action Steps?
  • Georgia strategic prevention system (gasps) coalition draft v4 mb-m

    1. 1. Georgia Strategic Prevention System (GASPS) <ul><li>GASPS Structure </li></ul><ul><li>Coalition Building </li></ul><ul><li>An Online Review </li></ul>Presented by: Becky Croft, MS, ICPS – DBHDD Regional Prevention Specialist Marcus Bouligny – GSU - CITF
    2. 2. Training Objectives <ul><li>Participants will be able to list the three primary structural requirements for building and participating in GASPS. </li></ul><ul><li>Participants will identify the three core elements of a successful community coalition as defined by CADCA ( www.cadca.org ) </li></ul><ul><li>Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America 625 Slaters Lane Suite 300 Alexandria, VA 22314 Tel 1-800-54-CADCA  Fax 703-706-0565 </li></ul>
    3. 3. Welcome <ul><li>Quick review of our Goto Meeting platform </li></ul><ul><li>Share your name, provider name, and geographical area(s) that you will be serving. </li></ul><ul><li>Your support team RPS and GSU. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Change… <ul><li>It is important to recognize and preserve unique qualities while finding new ways for systems to work together. </li></ul>
    5. 5. The purpose of the GASPS is… <ul><li>To build prevention infrastructure and capacity in the state of Georgia at the state and local and regional levels. </li></ul><ul><li>To promote the use of Evidence Based sustainable strategies through the state-wide implementation of the Strategic Prevention Framework. </li></ul>
    6. 6. GASPS Vision & Mission Vision Healthy fully realized Georgians living in communities free of the debilitating effects of substance use & abuse Mission To systematically implement a statewide multi-level strategy that assists communities in developing and implementing prevention programs and policies in anticipation of and in response to its citizens
    7. 7. GASPS State Selected Goals <ul><ul><li>Reduce the early onset of alcohol use among 9-20 year olds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce access to alcohol and binge drinking among 9-20 year olds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce binge & heavy drinking among 18-25 year olds. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For more information on the selection of the statewide goals visit www.ga-sps.org click the orientation materials link </li></ul></ul>
    8. 9. State Advisory Steering Committee (ASC) State Prevention Alliance Workgroup (SPAW) TA & Support Services Data Structure | Region Regional Prevention Alliance Workgroup (RPAW) TA & Support Services Data Structure | Sub Region Community Prevention Alliance* Workgroup (CPAW) TA & Support Services Data Structure GASPS Design
    9. 10. GASPS Three Structural Supports <ul><li>Regional Prevention Alliance Workgroup (RPAW) supports prevention-related activities at the regional level. The PC will serve as a RPAW rep. </li></ul><ul><li>Community Prevention Alliance Workgroup (CPAW) supports prevention-related activities and builds capacity at the community level. Including SPF steps and process. </li></ul><ul><li>Coalition linkage : Providers must have a formalized link to a community coalition in each area where services are being conducted. </li></ul>
    10. 11. Overview of the RPAW <ul><li>RPAW – Regional Prevention Alliance Workgroup </li></ul><ul><li>The RPAW will be comprised of the project coordinators and CPAW representatives </li></ul><ul><li>Each OPSP contracted provider will be represented at the RPAW </li></ul>
    11. 12. Overview of the CPAW <ul><li>CPAW – Community Prevention Alliance Workgroup Functions </li></ul><ul><li>Functions of the CPAW: 1. Help build capacity and infrastructure at the community level. 2. Help execute process SPF steps and products as well as implement EBPPP at the community level during implementation step 4. </li></ul><ul><li>Each OPSP-SPS contracted provider will convene a CPAW. The CPAW will be comprised of three sub-workgroups/categories: 1)Epidemiology; 2) Operations; and 3) Evaluation. </li></ul>
    12. 13. <ul><li>Assemble Workgroup elements </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Epidemiology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning & Operation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluation & Sustainability </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Establish workgroup procedures and operating structure </li></ul><ul><li>Foster collaboration & active communication to meet selected goals & objectives </li></ul>Establish Multidiscipline Workgroup
    13. 14. CPAW Operations <ul><li>The Project Coordinator (PC) will serve as the Team Lead / coordinator of their respective CPAW. </li></ul><ul><li>PC must maintain records of CPAW activities i.e., meeting agendas, planning documents, and associated deliverables </li></ul><ul><li>CPAW should have three expertise elements Epi, Operations and Evaluation. This could be one person representing each element. </li></ul>
    14. 15. Why is a CPAW so important <ul><li>SAMHA has raised the bar around building local capacity to understand local data, implementing EBPPP using those data and evaluate progress and outcomes. </li></ul>
    15. 16. CPAW Meeting Information <ul><li>The CPAW can be comprised of three individuals that represent the three expertise elements Epi, Operations and Evaluation. This membership can grow as your CPAW matures. Each expertise element can also branch off into its own sub-workgroups </li></ul><ul><li>Each CPAW workgroup should meet at least monthly. Documentation of meeting minutes and attendance roster is to be turned in with monthly progress report. </li></ul><ul><li>The Project Coordinator (PC) will meet with the CPAW on a monthly basis. Documentation of meeting minutes and attendance roster is to be turned in with monthly progress report. </li></ul>
    16. 17. CPAW Workgroup Expertise Elements <ul><li>CPAW consists of three elements: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Epidemiological (Epi) experience element 2. Planning and Operations experience element 3. Evaluation and Sustainability experience element </li></ul>
    17. 18. Epidemiological (Epi) SPF-STEP EPI element function 1. Needs Assessment Participate in data collection, review and analysis Assist with the development of a needs assessment report Identify gaps in existing data Review existing secondary data sources SPF-STEP EPI element function 2. Capacity Building Identify gaps in existing data Assist with the development of capacity building reports Assist with resource planning and technical assistance Continue to understand community readiness
    18. 19. Planning & Operations <ul><li>Each provider should have staff implementing services as a member of this workgroup. </li></ul>SPF-STEP Planning element functions 3. Planning Assisting in the development of the action plan and other required reports Help Identify potential evidence-based strategies Develops and oversees operational procedures across systems Brings systematic, analytic thinking to understand SPF-STEP Planning element functions 4. Implementation Drives effective and efficient use of prevention resources
    19. 20. Evaluation & Sustainability <ul><li>Each provider should have staff implementing services as a member of this workgroup. </li></ul>SPF-STEP Evaluation element 5. Evaluation Assists with the collection and monitoring of evaluation data in the community Assists the state and external evaluation team with conducting monitoring evaluation activities Assists with collection and monitoring of NOMs data utilizing tow main database systems, the Database Builder (DbB) and MDS
    20. 21. Critical Questions Can CPAWS be combined if sharing the same community? Providers can share information and human resources. Process, structure and sequent documents / products need to be kept unique.
    21. 22. Critical Questions Can coalitions share the same community? Yes , and they should. However… All SPF step products and process need be kept unique to community of focus.
    22. 23. Critical Questions If a provider has multiple contracts in multiple regions, should the provider have multiple CPAWS? It is contract requirement. However… All provider communities must have unique SPF products, and each product needs to have the involvement of the CPAW.
    23. 24. Providers link to a Coalition <ul><li>Join an exiting ATOD focused coalition </li></ul><ul><li>Join a local coalition and bring GASPS goals to the coalition agenda / focus </li></ul><ul><li>Convene a GASPS coalition </li></ul>
    24. 25. Describe your current relationship to a local coalition <ul><li>Participatory </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative Projects </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing fiscal resources </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing operational structures </li></ul>
    25. 26. Coalition Sector Representation <ul><li>Sector Requirements (9 or 12) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Youth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Youth serving organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Business </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Media </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>School </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Law Enforcement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Civic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Health Care </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>State local, tribe with an expertise in Substance Abuse Prevention </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Who else should be at the table / How do we get them to the table (Refer to worksheet 1.A) </li></ul><ul><li>Are there tools or handouts to give to them to help them understand what we are asking them to do. </li></ul>
    26. 27. Questions??? <ul><li>Any questions related to CPAW and/or the coalition link? </li></ul>
    27. 28. Coalitions <ul><li>How can one word have so many different meanings? </li></ul>
    28. 29. Running a Successful Coalition is a Complex Task <ul><li>Like organizations, coalitions have missions and goals for their work. </li></ul><ul><li>However, unlike singular organizations, coalitions distribute their directions, resources and activities across multiple stakeholder groups – each with its own agendas, priorities, constraints and way of doing business. </li></ul>
    29. 30. Coalition Success <ul><li>Everything that happens in coalition work occurs because people and organizations lend their time, energy, skills, resources and expertise to these collective activities. </li></ul><ul><li>The coalition is the “ vehicle ” that helps the work happen across stakeholder groups in a more coordinated and focused way. </li></ul>
    30. 31. 3 Core Elements of building a successful coalition <ul><li>CADCA Best Practices </li></ul><ul><li>* Building Coalition Membership </li></ul><ul><li>* Coalition Organization </li></ul><ul><li>* Coalition Leadership </li></ul>
    31. 32. Building Coalition Membership <ul><li>What does strong membership look like? </li></ul><ul><li>1. Figuring out who the coalition needs inside the “ vehicle ” </li></ul><ul><li>2. Cultivating the engagement of stakeholders so that the coalition can appropriately use members ’ skills and resources. </li></ul>
    32. 33. Coalition Membership <ul><li>Note – There is no single “ right ” mix of stakeholders for every community. </li></ul><ul><li>In addition, the most appropriate mix of stakeholders for your community can be expected to change over the course of the work. </li></ul><ul><li>Diversity issues must be a constant consideration. Coalition leaders must create structures that foster unity with the community. </li></ul>
    33. 34. Steps to Strong Membership <ul><li>Step 1 – Plan to have the right people. </li></ul><ul><li>Step 2 – Plan to build a strong infrastructure. </li></ul><ul><li>Step 3 – Assess levels of interest and needed involvement. </li></ul><ul><li>Step 4 – Recruit and engage. </li></ul>
    34. 35. Step 1 – Plan to have the right people <ul><li>Affirm a coalition-wide commitment to cultural competence. </li></ul><ul><li>Think about how your coalition fits into the community as a whole, its approach to substance abuse issues and the priority needs identified in community assessment. </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss and document how your coalition will work with and translate to the cultural subgroups in your community. </li></ul><ul><li>Think about your coalition ’ s purpose and goals. </li></ul><ul><li>Use the following questions for brainstorming with stakeholder groups that your coalition needs to engage. </li></ul><ul><li>What organizations in the community control resources that could be helpful in realizing the goals? </li></ul><ul><li>Who has a say in what happens around prevention, programs and policies? </li></ul><ul><li>Who has a stake in the outcomes of these decisions? </li></ul><ul><li>Whose perspectives are needed to identify the best strategies? </li></ul><ul><li>Engage in outreach. To truly understand how to shape and conduct approaches that fit the different cultural elements in your community, the coalition needs to commit to ongoing outreach with engagement of the members of all groups. </li></ul>
    35. 36. Step 2 – Plan to build a strong infrastructure. <ul><li>Think about the skills, knowledge and resources your coalition will need to get its work done most effectively. </li></ul><ul><li>Compare this list with the groups and organizations identified in Step 1. It is most important that there is a good mix of these resources, and enough potential sources for each so that no one member or partner feels overburdened. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop skills and expertise needed to function internally as a coalition. This may be available through the groups identified in Step 1. Often however this involves not only bringing the group or organization to the table, but the individuals within that organization who can make the strongest contribution to regular operations. </li></ul>
    36. 37. Step 3 – Assess levels of interest and needed involvement. <ul><li>Examine your existing and potential partners lists and think about their interest in the coalition ’ s success. </li></ul><ul><li>Take time to discuss differences in language, communication style, attitudes, and traditions of stakeholders. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure each member understands why every other member is at the table and what he/she hopes to accomplish. </li></ul>
    37. 38. Step 4 – Recruit and Engage <ul><li>The best way to approach recruitment is simple, personal, face-to-face invitation. </li></ul><ul><li>Be prepared for some groups to decline membership. </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporate membership recruitment and engagement in your coalition ’ s ongoing efforts to publicize its work and maintain open communication channels with the community. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify and work around barriers to participation. </li></ul><ul><li>Set clear expectations. </li></ul><ul><li>Talk often about the coalition ’ s goals and progress made toward them. </li></ul><ul><li>Celebrate, honor, and respect your members ’ contributions. </li></ul>
    38. 39. Coalition Organization <ul><li>Key components of coalition organization… </li></ul><ul><li>Clear roles and organizational structure. </li></ul><ul><li>Good meeting and communication habits. </li></ul><ul><li>Appropriate legal and financial structures and practices. </li></ul>
    39. 40. Coalition Organization <ul><li>Coalitions should avoid creating new service-providing organizations. Instead they should focus on tackling the broader service coordination, systems change and policy needs that coalitions must address. </li></ul><ul><li>In addition, this could place the coalition in competition with other organizations instead of helping to build the capacity to leverage resources. </li></ul>
    40. 41. Coalition Organization Key Component 1: Clear roles and organizational structure <ul><li>Create written “ job descriptions ” for all roles created by the coalition. </li></ul><ul><li>Get members ’ agreement on the expectations for active membership. </li></ul><ul><li>Establish the objectives and authority of each committee/workgroup. </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid spreading your coalition ’ s efforts too thin. </li></ul>
    41. 42. Coalition Organization Key Component 2: Good meeting and communication habits <ul><li>Hold meetings regularly. </li></ul><ul><li>Use an effective agenda and distribute it well in advance of the meeting date. The most effective meeting agendas include: what, who, how long, action/outcome. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep the meeting on track. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep quality meeting minutes. </li></ul><ul><li>Use email lists, online groups or other electronic tools to keep information flowing. Other ideas: Establish a blog, Identify the reporter or editorial staff at your local paper who covers community issues, Make meeting minutes and agendas available on a Web site. </li></ul>
    42. 43. Coalition Organization Key Component 3: Appropriate legal and financial structures and practices. <ul><li>Regardless of whether or not your coalition decides to incorporate, you will need to have a clear plan and accounting procedures for monies the coalition receives and spends. If a fiduciary organization agrees to maintain the budget and books for the coalition, you will need to negotiate procedures and approval mechanisms for spending. </li></ul><ul><li>If the coalition incorporates, you will not only need these procedures but also an organizational structure to maintain and monitor the financial records, including a designated treasurer, and ideally, an external accountant or bookkeeper. </li></ul>
    43. 44. Coalition Leadership <ul><li>The “ Inner Game ” of Coalition Work </li></ul><ul><li>Coalitions involve harnessing the knowledge, resources and energies of members to create and implement cross cutting approaches to complex issues . </li></ul><ul><li>To accomplish this goal, efforts must be well coordinated and strategic , and must attend to the community ’ s most important resources: the relationships among people and organizations. </li></ul><ul><li>Promoting and balancing these practical and relational concerns embodies good leadership. </li></ul>
    44. 45. Coalition Leadership <ul><li>Leadership must address the following concerns at multiple levels. </li></ul><ul><li>The internal processes of the coalition must be managed. </li></ul><ul><li>The coalition must also bridge to and influence activities and resources in the larger community. </li></ul>
    45. 46. Aspects of Leadership Coalition leaders fulfill multiple aspects and multiple roles. <ul><li>Leader as facilitator. </li></ul><ul><li>Leader as content meta-expert. </li></ul><ul><li>Leader as visionary. </li></ul><ul><li>Leader as strategist. </li></ul><ul><li>Leader as broker. </li></ul><ul><li>Leader as spokesperson. </li></ul><ul><li>Leader as coordinator. </li></ul>
    46. 47. Shared Leadership <ul><li>Shared leadership allows everyone to work to their own strengths which is more personally rewarding and fosters ongoing commitment to the coalition. </li></ul><ul><li>The group will be stronger if multiple members are ready, willing and able to provide different kinds of leadership. </li></ul><ul><li>Distributing the core leadership functions lessens the chance of any one leader burning out and fosters the stability of your coalition in the face of membership turnover. </li></ul>
    47. 48. Steps to Facilitate Shared Leadership <ul><li>Identify the strengths and preferred roles among leaders and potential leaders. </li></ul><ul><li>Make room in the coalition structure for multiple leadership roles. </li></ul><ul><li>Build succession into the coalition ’ s structure. </li></ul><ul><li>Actively seek out training opportunities for existing and emerging coalition leaders. </li></ul><ul><li>Hold leadership retreats bringing current leadership and new/emerging leaders together. </li></ul><ul><li>Pair up new or potential leaders with others in established leadership roles to take on particular projects or tasks. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a youth leadership development program. </li></ul>
    48. 49. Activity <ul><li>Worksheet </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What person ’ s in your community might fit the required expertise elements for the CPAW ’ s Epi, Operations and </li></ul></ul></ul>
    49. 50. Questions
    50. 51. <ul><li>Assemble Workgroup elements </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Epidemiology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning & Operation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluation & Sustainability </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Establish workgroup procedures and operating structure </li></ul><ul><li>Foster collaboration & active communication to meet selected goals & objectives </li></ul><ul><li>RPS will be following up with TTA. </li></ul>Next Steps and Follow Up!

    ×