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CONTENT<br />the  stuff  that  attracts  the  audience  <br />that  is  sold  to  advertisers<br />
Many  Choices<br />Text<br />
What  is  content?<br />
How  can  Content  be  used  most  effectively?<br />
where  does  it  come  from?<br />
How  is  content  bought  and  sold?<br />are  there  content  “markets”?<br />
What  is  content?<br />
WHAT  ISN’T  CONTENT?<br />
where  does  CONTENT  come  from?<br />
A&R<br />
Websites<br />and<br />Blogs<br />Blog Aggregator<br />the  game  has  changed<br />
Networks<br />Self-produce<br />news magazines<br />NBC Studios<br />CBS Productions<br />License from a supplier<br />Twe...
Fin-syn<br />Financial interest and syndication rules:  A United States regulation imposed by the Federal Communications C...
How  can  Content  be  used  most  effectively?<br />
format  business<br />
A radio format, or programming format, or programming genre refers to the overall content broadcasting over a radio statio...
Many  different  formats  have  been  developed.<br />
Dayparting<br />Altering programming to fit with the audience’s changing activities during different times of the day.  <b...
Radio Dayparts<br />morning drive time	6-10 a.m.<br />midday	10 a.m. - 3 p.m./ 10-2<br />afternoon drive	3 - 7 p.m./2-6<br...
Largest Radio Audiences<br />Morning drive<br />Afternoon drive<br />Teenagers -- weekends and afterschool<br />10 a.m. - ...
Television -- Dayparts<br />Period of two or more hours, considered as a strategic unit in program schedules.  		(Walker &...
Television Dayparts<br />Early Morning  7 a.m. - 10 a.m.<br />Daytime  10 a.m. -- 4 p.m.<br />Early Fringe -- 4 p.m. -- 7 ...
More Dayparts<br />Saturdays<br />Sundays<br />
Largest Primetime Television Audience<br />Sunday<br />Monday<br />Tuesday<br />Wednesday<br />Thursday<br />Friday<br />S...
Largest Primetime Television Audience<br />Sunday<br />Monday<br />Tuesday<br />Thursday<br />Wednesday<br />Saturday<br /...
Programming Lingo<br />Blunting<br />Scheduling a similar show in same time slot (opposite of counterprogramming)<br />Bri...
Counterprogramming<br />Scheduling programs with contrasting appeal to target unserved or underserved demographic groups.<...
Hammocking<br />program between two successes<br />Tent-poling<br />hit between two shows want to build<br />
Rerun<br />repeat showing<br />Strip<br />same show every day in same time slot<br />Wheel<br />rotate shows in same time ...
Roadblock<br />same commercial on all channels at same time<br />Scatter Plan<br />short schedule of spots covering a vari...
Upfront Market (USA)<br />Annual pre-season purchasing of commercial time for which audience levels are guaranteed. <br />...
Objectives<br />Audience Flow<br />Audience Habit<br />
Types of Television Programming<br />Dramas<br />Sitcoms<br />Made-for-TV Movies<br />Soap Operas<br />News<br />News maga...
Program Seasons<br />Regular Season<br />Sweeps<br />November, February, May and July<br />Summer / rerun<br />Pilot seaso...
New season announced late spring<br />networks will sell 75% of their time up-front<br />Sponsorships<br />Spot announceme...
Cable Network Niches<br />News and public affairs<br />Sports<br />General interest<br />Specialty entertainment<br />come...
Online and Emerging Media<br />Present content similar to newspaper/magazine.<br />New technology will increase “streaming...
How is content bought and sold?<br />
Program “Markets”<br />Network provided<br />Local production<br />Syndication<br />First Run<br />Off-net<br />
Network Licensing<br />deficit deal<br />network sells commercial time<br />affiliates receive some commercial time (avail...
Syndication<br />Barter<br />program free to the station; syndicators keep all availables<br />Barter-plus-cash<br />fee f...
Market Structure<br />
Barriers to Entry<br />significant<br />
The Deal<br />
Idea for a new sitcom<br />Agent<br />Access to programming decision makers<br />Pitch idea<br />Development<br />scripts ...
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Content (Programming)

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Content (Programming)

  1. 1. CONTENT<br />the stuff that attracts the audience <br />that is sold to advertisers<br />
  2. 2. Many Choices<br />Text<br />
  3. 3. What is content?<br />
  4. 4. How can Content be used most effectively?<br />
  5. 5. where does it come from?<br />
  6. 6. How is content bought and sold?<br />are there content “markets”?<br />
  7. 7. What is content?<br />
  8. 8. WHAT ISN’T CONTENT?<br />
  9. 9.
  10. 10. where does CONTENT come from?<br />
  11. 11.
  12. 12.
  13. 13.
  14. 14.
  15. 15. A&R<br />
  16. 16. Websites<br />and<br />Blogs<br />Blog Aggregator<br />the game has changed<br />
  17. 17.
  18. 18. Networks<br />Self-produce<br />news magazines<br />NBC Studios<br />CBS Productions<br />License from a supplier<br />Twentieth Television<br />Warner Bros. TV<br />Columbia TriStar TV<br />Disney/Touchstone<br />
  19. 19. Fin-syn<br />Financial interest and syndication rules: A United States regulation imposed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in 1970 which limited the amount of financial interest of broadcast networks in their programming. The regulation was repealed in 1995. <br />
  20. 20. How can Content be used most effectively?<br />
  21. 21.
  22. 22. format business<br />
  23. 23. A radio format, or programming format, or programming genre refers to the overall content broadcasting over a radio station. <br />Some stations broadcast multiple genres on set schedule. <br />Over the years, formats have evolved and new ones have been introduced. <br />In today's age of radio, many radio formats are designed to reach a specifically defined segment or niche of the listening population based on suchdemographic criteria as age, ethnicity, background, etc.<br />www.radiostationworld.com<br />
  24. 24. Many different formats have been developed.<br />
  25. 25.
  26. 26.
  27. 27.
  28. 28.
  29. 29.
  30. 30. Dayparting<br />Altering programming to fit with the audience’s changing activities during different times of the day. <br />(Walker & Ferguson)<br />
  31. 31. Radio Dayparts<br />morning drive time 6-10 a.m.<br />midday 10 a.m. - 3 p.m./ 10-2<br />afternoon drive 3 - 7 p.m./2-6<br />evening 7 p.m. - midnight/6-10<br />overnight midnight - 6 a.m./10-2<br />
  32. 32. Largest Radio Audiences<br />Morning drive<br />Afternoon drive<br />Teenagers -- weekends and afterschool<br />10 a.m. - 3 p.m. -- more women than men<br />
  33. 33.
  34. 34. Television -- Dayparts<br />Period of two or more hours, considered as a strategic unit in program schedules. (Walker & Ferguson)<br />
  35. 35. Television Dayparts<br />Early Morning 7 a.m. - 10 a.m.<br />Daytime 10 a.m. -- 4 p.m.<br />Early Fringe -- 4 p.m. -- 7 p.m.<br />Access -- 7 - 8 p.m.<br />Origin was Prime Time Access Rule<br />time between network news and network prime time<br />Prime Time -- 8 - 11 p.m. (7 - 10 p.m.)<br />Late Fringe -- 11:00 p.m. - 1 a.m.<br />Overnight -- 1 a.m. - 7 a.m.<br />
  36. 36. More Dayparts<br />Saturdays<br />Sundays<br />
  37. 37. Largest Primetime Television Audience<br />Sunday<br />Monday<br />Tuesday<br />Wednesday<br />Thursday<br />Friday<br />Saturday<br />
  38. 38. Largest Primetime Television Audience<br />Sunday<br />Monday<br />Tuesday<br />Thursday<br />Wednesday<br />Saturday<br />Friday<br />
  39. 39. Programming Lingo<br />Blunting<br />Scheduling a similar show in same time slot (opposite of counterprogramming)<br />Bridging<br />Beginning a program a half-hour earlier than competitors to steal their audience.<br />Checkerboard<br />programming a different show each night in the same time period<br />
  40. 40. Counterprogramming<br />Scheduling programs with contrasting appeal to target unserved or underserved demographic groups.<br />Flowthrough (Audience Flow)<br />people don’t bother to change the channel<br />want a strong lead-in for news<br />show at start of prime time is “lead-off”<br />
  41. 41. Hammocking<br />program between two successes<br />Tent-poling<br />hit between two shows want to build<br />
  42. 42. Rerun<br />repeat showing<br />Strip<br />same show every day in same time slot<br />Wheel<br />rotate shows in same time slot<br />
  43. 43. Roadblock<br />same commercial on all channels at same time<br />Scatter Plan<br />short schedule of spots covering a variety of time slots over a few weeks<br />Pods<br />grouping of commercials within the broadcast schedule<br />
  44. 44. Upfront Market (USA)<br />Annual pre-season purchasing of commercial time for which audience levels are guaranteed. <br />Clearance<br />Refers to the acceptance of a program by a network or station. <br />
  45. 45. Objectives<br />Audience Flow<br />Audience Habit<br />
  46. 46. Types of Television Programming<br />Dramas<br />Sitcoms<br />Made-for-TV Movies<br />Soap Operas<br />News<br />News magazines<br />Morning shows<br />Talk shows<br />Specials<br />Sports<br />Children’s<br />cartoons<br />Infomercials<br />Reality shows<br />Game shows<br />Music videos<br />Documentaries<br />How-to shows<br />Home Shopping<br />
  47. 47. Program Seasons<br />Regular Season<br />Sweeps<br />November, February, May and July<br />Summer / rerun<br />Pilot season<br />Hiatus<br />
  48. 48. New season announced late spring<br />networks will sell 75% of their time up-front<br />Sponsorships<br />Spot announcements<br />
  49. 49. Cable Network Niches<br />News and public affairs<br />Sports<br />General interest<br />Specialty entertainment<br />comedy<br />science fiction<br />Cartoon<br />Education and information<br />Improvement<br />Shopping<br />Religion<br />Women, children & ethnic<br />Adult Entertainment<br />
  50. 50. Online and Emerging Media<br />Present content similar to newspaper/magazine.<br />New technology will increase “streaming audio and video.”<br />
  51. 51. How is content bought and sold?<br />
  52. 52. Program “Markets”<br />Network provided<br />Local production<br />Syndication<br />First Run<br />Off-net<br />
  53. 53. Network Licensing<br />deficit deal<br />network sells commercial time<br />affiliates receive some commercial time (availables) and compensation<br />
  54. 54. Syndication<br />Barter<br />program free to the station; syndicators keep all availables<br />Barter-plus-cash<br />fee for program; syndicator keeps a few minutes<br />new forms of deals appearing<br />
  55. 55. Market Structure<br />
  56. 56. Barriers to Entry<br />significant<br />
  57. 57. The Deal<br />
  58. 58. Idea for a new sitcom<br />Agent<br />Access to programming decision makers<br />Pitch idea<br />Development<br />scripts -- teleplay<br />Pilot<br />Order<br />It’s a Hit!<br />

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