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Opening The Door
to Russian
Art
PROFESSOR CAROL
People frequently tell me they want to get to know art or music,
but they just don’t know the best place to start.
Well, t...
5 Paintings to Start
Information about each painting follows.
Andrei Rublev
The Holy Trinity (14th Century)
Rublev’s icon of the Holy Trinity is
beloved across the Christian world. He
...
Ivan Shishkin
Rain in an Oak Forest (1891)
The forest matters deeply in
Russian culture, and no one
painted the forest bet...
Alexei Venetsianov
Reaping, Summer (1827)
Peasants became popular subjects of
Russian art in the early 19th century and no...
Ilya Repin
Barge Haulers on the Volga (1870-73)
Of the painters known as The
Wanderers, none surpasses
Repin. Barge Hauler...
Natalia Goncharova
Cyclist (1913)
One of the most versatile of
the early 20th-century avant-
garde artists, Goncharova
cap...
The Circle of Scholars
Our Western Cultural heritage is not an elective. It’s a treasure!
All of Professor Carol’s courses...
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Opening the Door to Russian Art

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Russian Art provides a rich and rewarding experience for anyone who wants to learn more about the arts, and it is an important part of our online course "Imperial Russia - A Cultural Odyssey."

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Opening the Door to Russian Art

  1. 1. Opening The Door to Russian Art PROFESSOR CAROL
  2. 2. People frequently tell me they want to get to know art or music, but they just don’t know the best place to start. Well, there is no best place to start. The important thing is to start. You’ll be glad you did. So let’s open the door to Russian Art.
  3. 3. 5 Paintings to Start Information about each painting follows.
  4. 4. Andrei Rublev The Holy Trinity (14th Century) Rublev’s icon of the Holy Trinity is beloved across the Christian world. He depicted the Old Testament account of Three Angels visiting Abraham and Sarah, focusing solely on the trio of angels. The placement of the angels had enormous influence, resulting in countless copies down the centuries. Today Rublev’s Trinity is housed in Moscow’s Tretiakov Gallery, which brings up the complex question of whether valuable holy images should be secured in museums or returned to their proper places in churches.
  5. 5. Ivan Shishkin Rain in an Oak Forest (1891) The forest matters deeply in Russian culture, and no one painted the forest better than Shishkin. Gnarled tree trunks, delicate birch leaves, and translucent skies frame small figures engaged in ordinary life. Shishkin was highly educated, studying abroad to absorb the trends of European Romanticism. His paintings abound in crisp detail and poetic softness.
  6. 6. Alexei Venetsianov Reaping, Summer (1827) Peasants became popular subjects of Russian art in the early 19th century and no one captured them better than Venetsianov. His peasants, however, were idealized. Poetic in appearance, they appear at rest or happily engaged in tasks. Society wasn’t ready for the realistic paintings done by the next generation of Russian artists, The Wanderers.
  7. 7. Ilya Repin Barge Haulers on the Volga (1870-73) Of the painters known as The Wanderers, none surpasses Repin. Barge Haulers on the Volga shows in detail the backbreaking labor of hauling barges up a river—labor long abundant in Russia due to the enslaved bulk of the population known as serfs. His paintings often presented disturbing social messages or shocking versions of historical events. He also painted famous figures of his day, including fascinating renditions of Tolstoy. Repin’s late works are awash in Impressionism.
  8. 8. Natalia Goncharova Cyclist (1913) One of the most versatile of the early 20th-century avant- garde artists, Goncharova captured the clang of factories and the anxiety of modern society. Her vivid sense of color led her to design exceptional sets for the legendary Ballets Russe. She was inspired also by old Russian icons. After the Bolshevik Revolution she made her career in Paris.
  9. 9. The Circle of Scholars Our Western Cultural heritage is not an elective. It’s a treasure! All of Professor Carol’s courses in a single subscription. Just $15/month

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