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Georgia strategy summit presentations 2015

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State of Georgia Strategy
Summit 2015

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Rick Dunn
OPB Deputy Director

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Georgia’s Fiscal Situation
Strategy Summit 2015
October 26, 2015
Presenter: Rick Dunn, Deputy Director, OPB

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Georgia strategy summit presentations 2015

  1. 1. State of Georgia Strategy Summit 2015
  2. 2. Rick Dunn OPB Deputy Director
  3. 3. Georgia’s Fiscal Situation Strategy Summit 2015 October 26, 2015 Presenter: Rick Dunn, Deputy Director, OPB
  4. 4. State Revenue
  5. 5. Revenue now above pre- recession levels... - 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 *Fiscal 2015 numbers are estimated; Fiscal 2016 are state appropriations Revenue (Total State) ($M)*
  6. 6. Six straight years of growth, but growth remains moderate Revenue Growth % (Total State)* ** Average *Fiscal 2015 numbers are estimated; Fiscal 2016 are state appropriations **1981-2015 average annual rate of growth is 6.2 percent -10% -8% -6% -4% -2% 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14% 16%
  7. 7. And on a per capita, inflation adjusted basis, revenue at 1994 levels 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 Per Capita Revenue (Total State), 2015 Dollars
  8. 8. Revenue Shortfall Reserve: Growing but still below target $0 $500,000,000 $1,000,000,000 $1,500,000,000 $2,000,000,000 $2,500,000,000 Revenue Shortfall Reserve 10 percent of Net Treasury Receipts 2015 RSR (est)= $1.2B 2015 RSR Target = $2B Fiscal Year 2015 RSR is estimated and excludes 1% midyear adjustment for K-12
  9. 9. State Expenditures
  10. 10. Much of the budget is “non-discretionary” Non-Discretionary 83% Discretionary 17% “Mandatory” Spending in State Budget “Non-Discretionary” Spending • Dedicated fund sources • Funding formulas • Population-driven programs • Legal obligations Includes: • Motor Fuel and Lottery funds • Education funding formulas • Medicaid spending, prison populations, debt service Based upon enacted FY 2015 budget
  11. 11. What makes up the 83% in “non-discretionary” spending?  Enrollment driven education programs are more than 60% of non-discretionary spending ◦ K-12 Programs ($7.8B) ◦ Regents (Teaching)($1.7B) ◦ TCSG ($296M) ◦ HOPE ($614M) ◦ Pre-K ($314M)  Medicaid and PeachCare costs are 17% of non- discretionary spending K-12 Enrollment 45.3% Medicaid and PeachCare 17.3% Higher Ed Formulas 11.7% Correctional Systems 8.5%General Obligation Debt 6.5% Transportation (Motor Fuel) 4.9% HOPE 3.5% Pre-K 1.8% Other 0.5% Based upon enacted FY 2015 budget
  12. 12. Anticipated revenue growth in FY 2016: Where did it go? 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Percentage Change in Base Budgets, FY 2015 – FY 2016 FY16 growth = $1B over original FY15 estimate • 70% went for education • 10% to increased debt service • 9% to public safety Conservative revenue estimates allow growth in RSR
  13. 13. Budget Challenges
  14. 14. Medicaid Structural Imbalance (National Data) 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 PercentGrowth State tax revenue Medicaid spending forecast Sources: Moody’s Analytics, CMS, Census Bureau
  15. 15. Transportation Funding HB 170 replaced state sales tax with additional excise tax on motor fuel – net 6.7 cent increase per gallon. • All motor fuel tax collections must be allocated for highway/bridge construction and maintenance projects • Eliminated the “fourth penny” of sales tax on motor fuels that was deposited into the General Fund. Estimated $167M loss of general revenue. HB 170 also included additional funding sources for transportation. • New annual fee on electric vehicles and heavy trucks • New $5 per night hotel/motel fee • Elimination of LEV/ZEV tax credit and jet fuel exemption Though this revenue will be deposited into the General Fund, the intent is that the additional funds generated will be used exclusively for transportation.
  16. 16. Employee Retention FY 2014 state turnover rate = 18% Turnover rates for jobs such as corrections officer, health aide, DFCS caseworker, and nurse considerably higher. • Over half of all executive branch hirings each year are in these positions
  17. 17. Education Reform Commission Will be delivering recommendations that will likely require funding changes for both FY 2017 and FY 2018
  18. 18. Pre Summit Survey & Breakouts Joe Coberly, Innovation Program Director GTA
  19. 19. Pre-Summit Survey What are the top three business opportunities or challenges facing your agency in meeting the objectives of your strategic plan over the next few years?
  20. 20. Which IT Considerations are most important in achieving your strategic objectives (select or add to list)
  21. 21. Top Challenges for Breakouts IT Consideration Room Top Challenges Business Intelligence / Decision Support 334 Process/ Automation Budget/Finance Cloud Strategies 331 Staffing/ Talent Process/Automation Cyber Security 330 Staffing/ Talent Process/Automation Data Sharing 324 Process/ Automation Mobile Workforce 323 Process/ Automation Budget/Finance
  22. 22. 37% 45% 10% 8% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% Business Functions (Registration - 60) Business IT Finance Strategy
  23. 23. ENTERPRISE IT STRATEGIC PLAN ‘2020 UPDATE’ Mike Curtis, Director Planning GTA Download Powerpoint to see Note Slides for details
  24. 24. 5. Technology Summit(Q4) 4. Innovation Review (Q3) 3. Georgia IT Strategy Published (Q3) 2. Strategy Summit(Q2) Environmental Scan (Q1) Environmental Scan (Q1 2. Strategy Summit(Q2 Strategic Plan Update 3. Georgia IT Strategy Published (Q3 4. Innovation Review (Q3) 5. Technology Summit(Q4) IT Strategy Cycle
  25. 25. GEORGIA ENTERPRISE IT STRATEGIC PLAN 2020 Roadmap of six technology capability areas to support business operations Near-Term 2014-2015 Mid-Term 2016-2018 Long-Term 2017-2020 Mobility 1: Enable all state employees who need to work remotely, when appropriate. Citizen Access 2: Improve Georgia citizen access to state services Innovate Government 3: Innovate state government with effective, enterprise-wide integration of technology Shared Services 4: Create an enterprise portfolio of shared, technology-enabled services. Data Governing 5: Improve the use of state data for decision making and information sharing Funding Models 6: Develop an agile approach to funding agency adoption of technology solutions Goals:
  26. 26. Mobile Workforce: Enable all state employees who need to work remotely, when appropriate. 2014-2015 Objectives: 2016-2018 Objectives: 2017-2020 Objectives: 1. Execute enterprise-wide contracts for mobile services by June 30, 2015. Mobile Contract Sprint, ATT, Verizon, TMobile Office365 Contract 2. Integrate mobile services, infrastructure and policies by March 31, 2017. 3. Establish repeatable processes to allow appropriate state employee workflow to adapt to an increasingly mobile business model by December 31, 2017. Near-Term Mid-Term Long-Term Georgia.gov published web based ‘responsive’ apps design standards
  27. 27. 2014-2015 Objectives: 2016-2018 Objectives: 2017-2020 Objectives: 1. Begin systematically shifting agency service delivery to an online self service model by June 30, 2015. Drupal web platform, responsive design for mobile 2014: 76 million page views and 17 million visitors. 5 months of 2015: 44 million page views, 43% mobile percent 2. Begin Shifting appropriate services to a Fully enabled mobile model by June 30, 2016. Near-Term Mid-Term Long-Term Citizen Access: Improve citizen access to state services. Georgia.gov provides web analytic tools for website traffic Most agencies have social media presence, internal social media managers. Georgia.gov; 4300 Facebook likes 20,000 followers on twitter
  28. 28. 2014-2015 Objectives: 2016-2018 Objectives: 2017-2020 Objectives: 1. Baseline the use of shared services in the state by June 30, 2015. Baseline through the SEAC (Strategic Enterprise Applications Council)) Enterprise applications approved: Teamworks/PeopleSoft Funnel of applications for review 2. Facilitate the expansion of the portfolio of market-based enterprise shared services for state agencies by June 30, 2017. 3. Offer a mature enterprise portfolio of shared services by June 30, 2019. Near-Term Mid-Term Long-Term Shared Services: Create an enterprise portfolio of shared, technology-enabled services. Agencies use Cloud solutions on a per agency basis.
  29. 29. 2014-2015 Objectives: 2016-2018 Objectives: 2017-2020 Objectives: 1. Improve the ability to secure and protect state data by June 30, 2015. 2. Promote the utilization of the Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) within state agency data management operations by June 30, 2016. 3. Ensure the privacy and authorized use of citizen data by June 30, Near-Term Mid-Term Long-Term Data Governing: Improve the use of state data for decision making and information sharing. Published a Data Life Cycle Management Policy, Data Steward Standard and Data Sharing Standard Governor established Cybersecurity Board and program. Data Sharing MOU templates in support of the Data Standard.
  30. 30. 2014-2015 Objectives: 2016-2018 Objectives: 2017-2020 Objectives: 1. Develop governance processes that allow for the adoption of enterprise technology solutions by June 30, 2016. Strategic Enterprise Applications Council to review application candidates for enterprise application. Enterprise Managed Services Standard Storage consumption program. 2. Analyze and revise the state technology acquisition business model for improvement opportunities by June 30, 2016. 3. Develop a more diverse portfolio of technology product and service offerings for our customers by June 30, 2017. Near-Term Mid-Term Long-Term Funding Models: Develop an agile approach to funding agency adoption of technology solutions. GTA revised service sourcing business model to multi sourcing Integrator to increase providers and price competition.
  31. 31. 2014-2015 Objectives: 2016-2018 Objectives: 2017-2020 Objectives: 1. Establish a process for identifying, prioritizing and funding innovation opportunities by June 30, 2015. Innovation Program in place. Seven innovation initiatives, three business cases in development, one pilot. Innovation Teams led by agencies Innovation Committee reviewing initiatives. 2. Begin fielding agency-spanning business models by June 30, 2016. Near-Term Mid-Term Long-Term Innovate Government: Innovate state government with effective, enterprise-wide integration of technology.
  32. 32. Innovation Update
  33. 33. Three Components of Innovation GETS Quality and Innovation Advisory Council Georgia Innovation Program GETS Quality and Innovation Advisory Council Technology Innovation Showcase
  34. 34. 34
  35. 35. Innovation Update: Top-down Initiatives Idea Brief Case Project • Contracts Management • MorphoTrust Tax Fraud Reduction – Ideation • Collaboration through Data Sharing • How-To Georgia • User Authentication – Simple Sign-on • Enterprise LMS • Grant Management • Statewide Data Directory • GTA LMS (Proof of Concept) Track
  36. 36. Crowd-Sourced Ideation & Evaluation
  37. 37. In-Summit Poll – Strategy Summit 2014 These questions were asked at the end of the Strategy Summit. Question Responses 1. Which opportunity best suits your agency? 66 2. Which opportunity has the potential for greatest citizen impact? 61 3. Which opportunity is most likely to be realized in the next 18 months 61 4. Is your agency likely to commit resources (Is your agency likely to commit resources (staff hours, facilities, $$$) to cross-agency innovation?) 58
  38. 38. 66 Responses Grants Management Statewide Data Directory
  39. 39. 61 Responses Grants Management Statewide Data Directory
  40. 40. 61 Responses Grants Management Statewide Data Directory
  41. 41. 58 Responses
  42. 42. Grants Management Receiving grants subcommittee • Business Case under development Action Team: Monica Bradshaw (SAO), Tisha Phillips (DHS), Kate Pfirman (DPH), Kathleen Robinson (DPH), Yvonne Turner (OPB), Renee York (DPH)
  43. 43. Statewide Data Directory Action Team: Ananias Williams (DJJ), Oscar Galindo (DHS), John Martin (DNR), Steve Nichols (GA CTO), Charlie Sasser (GTA), Kym Vrooman (DDS)
  44. 44. IT Service Integration on the GETS Platform Strategy Summit – October 26, 2015
  45. 45. What is Service Integration? The management of separately contracted and supplied IT services to ensure they consistently work together to deliver business benefits. The Service Integrator is the primary operational interface between the client and its IT service providers and is accountable for service performance.
  46. 46. The Path to a Future State 46
  47. 47. Why now? Considering the future  No significant issues with current set up  Formulating future strategy for IT sourcing  How do I shape the future?  What do I do next?  How should my IT be set up for the next 3-5 years?1 Dissatisfied with existing arrangements  Client’s existing supply operating to contractual commitments but still not satisfied  Unable to drive desired business value  What are the alternatives?  How can I improve my existing approach?  How can I safely introduce a change?2 Distressed with existing arrangements  Poor performance of existing IT supply – with material business consequences  Client is unable to manage or influence suppliers to adapt to change and progress  I need to change course quickly, but not sure how  I don’t want to end up in the same situation through a costly procurement process  Business operations are constrained by IT performance 3 Three typical client scenarios Questions and considerations 47
  48. 48. Key business drivers Stressed IT budgets Renewals & Remediation Cloud service adoption Effective Service Integration is a pre-requisite for being able to exploit cloud services. In-source vs. single source vs. multi source CIO still facing cost pressures, access to skills and quality are major challenges Drivers Description The bottom line: In many cases, current IT sourcing models are not delivering the expected benefits Need for innovation You have the best IT suppliers but have you got the best IT service? 48
  49. 49. Key Elements – Service Integrator • Facilitates an open platform for any vendor and scope • Presents a seasoned process management methodology acceptable to all • Embraces shared accountability for performance in a shared environment • Operates as a subject matter expert for the cross functional services disciplines • Supports the ‘plug & play’ objectives of a shared services platform through proactive engagement in change management 49
  50. 50. Problem / Need Solution Value / Result Managing Technology Change – speed, scale and complexity A change based ‘Plug & Play’ Platform for services delivery Low Switching Costs – Healthy ‘co-opetition’ Accountability and control of IT Service delivery A separation of functional roles with documented interdependencies A shared platform - improved control and accountability Responsiveness to business needs in a federated shared services model An active engagement model to address shared and competing interests of multiple parties Flexibility and adaptability to meet change Shared Services Delivery Platform Value Proposition 50
  51. 51. Key Elements – Shared Services Delivery Platform • A well-defined and transparent rules-based environment • Capable of making equitable adjustments among competing interests • A learning environment that can adapt to change and adopt valuable custom and practice on a consensual basis • Able to balance the interests of the enterprise with the exceptions of the custom project • Maintains competitive pressure through low barriers to change and an effective capability to ‘plug & play’ 51
  52. 52. Shared Services Delivery Platform 52 • Look into the Towers to show the service ecosystem • Shift from long-term deals to shorter service oriented agreements • Begin incorporating more agile services, with opportunities to – Supplement large All-in-One Tower-based services with targeted agile market-based services to bolster the IT offering – Enhance the agency experience with a more digital process from Order through Payment – Leverage the procurement process to incorporate targeted, shorter term service arrangements into the IT Catalog for true plug-and- play services • Maintain consistency of service delivery while responding to changing business needs
  53. 53. ©2015 Strategere Consulting ©2015 Strategere Consulting 53 Collaborating For Success in the Digital Era October 26, 2015 Phil Weinzimer President, Strategere Consulting
  54. 54. ©2015 Strategere Consulting ©2015 Strategere Consulting 54 Session Objective •How State of Georgia Can Leverage Private Sector Success to Provide Additional Innovative Services To Customers •Share Insights from McKinsey Study on How US State Governments Can improve Customer Service •Provide a Collaboration Framework to Help Agency Personnel Identify Innovative Services Across Multiple Agencies Enabled by Digital Technology
  55. 55. ©2015 Strategere Consulting ©2015 Strategere Consulting 55 Background •Governor’s Policy Goals for Georgia •Georgia Enterprise Strategic IT Plan - Goals
  56. 56. Governor’s Strategic Goals •Educated Producing Well-Prepared Students Who are Life, College, and Work-Ready •Mobile Economic Development Required Continued Ability to Move People and Good Efficiently •Growing Creation of Jobs and Growing Businesses •Healthy Improving the Health and Wellness of Georgians •Responsible / Efficient Gov’t. Increase Availability of State Services Through Innovative Technology Solutions ©2015 Strategere Consulting 56 •Safe Implement Innovative Strategies and Solutions to Protect Citizens
  57. 57. ©2015 Strategere Consulting ©2015 Strategere Consulting 57 “Citizens Have Come to Expect a Certain Level of Technology-Supported Services From Private Sector. Citizens Now Expect This Same Level of Service From Government” Georgia Enterprise IT Strategic Plan Planning Assumptions Georgia Enterprise 2020 Strategic Plan…Page 7
  58. 58. Georgia Enterprise IT Strategic Plan - Goals •Enable All State Workers to Work Remotely, When Appropriate • Improve Georgia Citizen Access to State Services •Innovate State Gov’t with Effective, Enterprise-Wide Integration of Technology • Create Enterprise Portfolio of Shared Technology Enabled Services • Improve Use of State Data for Decision Making and Information Sharing ©2015 Strategere Consulting 58 • Develop an Agile Approach to Funding Agency Adoption of Technology Solutions.
  59. 59. ©2015 Strategere Consulting ©2015 Strategere Consulting 59 How Private Sector Companies Provide Innovative Services
  60. 60. 60 Value 3. Implement Initiatives to Improve Margin (Sales / Cost) 2. Understand the Business, Focus on User Experience, and Improve Business Skills of IT Personnel 4. Leverage Technologies Strategically to Innovate Value Strategic IT Organization Transformation Phases Time 1. Provide Basic Services Exceptionally Well ©2015 Strategere Consulting 60
  61. 61. ©2015 Strategere Consulting ©2015 Strategere Consulting 61 A Process to Improve Delivery of Services
  62. 62. ©2015 Strategere Consulting 4. Leverage Technologies Strategically to Innovate Value "Kids brains are wired differently than those of previous generations. They live in a world centered on technology” “We wanted to create an experience leveraging technology to innovate value for our customers” David Finnegan, CIO ©2015 Strategere Consulting 62
  63. 63. ©2015 Strategere Consulting 63©2014 Strategere Consulting 63 4. Leverage Technologies Strategically to Innovate Value Develop a Digitize, Visualize, and Simulate strategy to manage, display, and model data. Decision Cockpits Digitize Visualize The Virtual Shelf Business Sphere Conference Rooms Simulate “Our role is to help the business make well- informed business decisions”
  64. 64. ©2015 Strategere Consulting ©2015 Strategere Consulting 64 How US States Can Improve Service to State Constituents
  65. 65. ©2015 Strategere Consulting ©2015 Strategere Consulting 65 How US State Governments Can Improve Customer Service “A McKinsey Center for Government survey finds that Americans are often dissatisfied with state services—and identifies significant opportunities for improvement.” December 2014 | by Aamer Baig, Andre Dua, and Vivian Riefberg http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/public_sector/how_us_state_governments_can_improve_customer_service?p=1
  66. 66. ©2015 Strategere Consulting ©2015 Strategere Consulting 66 How US State Governments Can Improve Customer Service • McKinsey Surveyed 17,000 people across 15 States • 29 Private/Public Sector Services(unemployment benefits, Education, State Parks, Insurance Health Care, Education, etc.) • Identified Five Common Themes •Four Major Recommendations to Seize the Opportunity
  67. 67. ©2015 Strategere Consulting ©2015 Strategere Consulting 67 Common Themes • Speed, Simplicity and Efficiency Make Citizens Happy •People Who Don’t Use a Service are Often More Skeptical About its Quality • Satisfaction is Often Lower for More Essential Services •Citizens are Less Satisfied with Government Services than with Private Sector Services • Most Citizens Prefer to Interact with Government Online
  68. 68. ©2015 Strategere Consulting ©2015 Strategere Consulting 68 Recommendations Seize the Opportunity • Put Services for Citizens on the Leadership Agenda • Focus Transformation Programs on Service Elements that Matter Most to the Satisfaction of Citizens • Set Priorities for Innovation •Measure Citizen Satisfaction Regularly
  69. 69. 69 • Private/Public Sector • Technology Innovations • Knowledge Base Digital Innovation Collaboration Framework • Intra/Inter Agency Teams • Out-Of-The Box Thinking • Benchmarking ©2015 Strategere Consulting 69 Digital Awareness (Knowledge) Digital Opportunities (Skills) Digital Innovation Teams (Collaborative) • Vision Innovative Services •Leadership •Communication • Process Centric • Value Opportunities • Outside-Inside Thinking
  70. 70. ©2015 Strategere Consulting Recommendations ©2015 Strategere Consulting 70 •Develop Digital Awareness Program to Capture, Share, and Improve Knowledge of How Information and Technology Enables Services continued •Use Today’s Afternoon Workshops to Collaborate on Identifying Immediate Service Improvement Areas •Continue to Develop a Digital Innovation Team Program to Focus on Identifying Information and Technology Opportunities Across State Agencies
  71. 71. ©2015 Strategere Consulting Recommendations ©2015 Strategere Consulting 71 •Use McKinsey and Other Research Studies to Focus on Citizen/Business Opportunity Areas to Improve Services • Celebrate Successes •Develop Digital Opportunity Program to Educate All Pertinent Agency Personnel of Value Chain of Services Provided by All Agencies • Develop a Communications Program to Publicize Initiatives to Improve Service • Continue to Collaborate Across Agencies to Identify Opportunities to Achieve Governors Strategic Goals
  72. 72. 72 ©2014 Strategere Consulting 72 Phil Weinzimer pweinzimer@gmail.com www.strategere.com
  73. 73. Innovation Breakout Session Results
  74. 74. Innovation Opportunity Brief: ‘Business Intelligence’ • Opportunity Name: Dashboarding • Summary – Gather business drivers from agencies who can opt-in to an enterprise view for performance management. Spokesperson(s) • Mark Williams – Prosecuting Attorney’s Office • David Schwartz – Department of Juvenile Justice Agencies • Community Affairs • Dept of Corrections • BOR • GTA • Prosecuting Attorney’s Council • DJJ • DHS • SAO • DOR 74
  75. 75. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Business Intelligence’ 1. How will this idea make a difference in achieving important state strategic objectives? (How does it move the needle toward better citizen services?) • Innovate government • Data governing • Mobility / Access from mobile devices – key metrics provide certain operational information at a glance. Real- time data access • Process integration • Efficiencies are critical – Cost avoidance • Example: Agencies are able to make data-driven decisions in a timely manner using their KPI’s. Describe Making a Difference • Shared services would allow agencies to learn from one another. • Ultimately citizens would be able to gain a view into government efficiency. • OPB – saves money and maximizes funding efficiency. 75
  76. 76. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Business Intelligence’ 2. Who needs to be involved to make this a success? (list key roles and agencies) • Agencies • SAO – financial information • GTA – IT infrastructure • Department of Corrections • Department of Juvenile Justice • Advocacy Groups • Citizens • Governor’s Office and OPB • Ex: Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities would provide citizens the ability to view ratings of facilities. 76
  77. 77. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Business Intelligence’ 3. How will you measure success? (list Primary Customers/Constituents and how they will be Impacted) Measures of Success: • Cost Savings / Cost Avoidance • Number of agencies “buy in” • Shared services • Citizen access • Benchmarking standards • Improved Business Performance • Measurable performance 77
  78. 78. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Cloud Strategy’ • Cloud Strategy Opportunity Name: Develop a Guideline/Framework for using cloud and an agency support structure • Spokesperson: Roger Custin, DOAS • Collaborating Agencies DHS, DOAS, DPS, DCH, OSAH, DNR, DBF • Opportunity Summary As agencies look to cloud, there are a number of challenges that should be examined for long term success. 78
  79. 79. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Cloud Strategy’ 1. How will this idea make a difference in achieving important strategic objectives? (How does it move the needle toward better citizen services?) - Lead to more informed decision making by agencies before selecting cloud solutions - Provide structure in a currently unstructured environment - Build a community around those who are using cloud to move from perceptions to reality 79
  80. 80. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Cloud Strategy’ 2. Who needs to be involved to make this a success? (list key roles and agencies) - Business Owners will be key stakeholders - Early adopters to share lessons learned - GTA, DOAS and OPB as support agencies 80
  81. 81. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Cloud Strategy’ 3. How will you measure success? (list Primary Customers/Constituents and how they will be Impacted) - End product is a program that agencies can use for guidance with cloud solutioning - Hosted on GTA website for easy access - Framework is utilized by agencies 81
  82. 82. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Cyber Security’ • Cyber Security Opportunity Name: Develop an innovative way to Staff/Acquire Cybersecurity Professionals and Services Summary • Inadequate cybersecurity resources (people, training, funding etc) Spokesperson: Kenny Rankin Agencies • GTA • GPSTC • GEMA • GBI • DOE • DNR 82
  83. 83. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Cyber Security’ 1. How will this idea make a difference in achieving important strategic objectives? (How does it move the needle toward better citizen services?) • Reduce security related risk through continuity. • Protecting Citizen sensitive data • # of Certified Professional • Describe Making a Difference Lessen the risk to the State due to inadequate cybersecurity resources. 83
  84. 84. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Cyber Security’ 2. Who needs to be involved to make this a success? (list key roles and agencies) Roles (Security Officers, Privacy Officers) Agencies (all State agencies) 84
  85. 85. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Cyber Security’ 3. How will you measure success? (list Primary Customers/Constituents and how they will be Impacted) • Retention and % of Certified Professionals • Develop benchmark measure of risk across the state based on critical systems • Evaluate the reduction of risk over time 85
  86. 86. Innovation Brief – ‘Data Sharing’ Opportunity Description: • Team Spokesperson: James Bulot (DHS) • Collaborating Agencies: DHS, CJCC, OPB, DOAS, DJJ, DCH, GBI, DBHDD • Opportunity Summary: Agencies who need various data often have trouble obtaining it quickly for time constrained situations. Personnel changes make this difficult. How do we ensure agencies get this information quickly without being re-authorized to receive this information?
  87. 87. ‘Data Sharing’ 1. How will this idea make a difference in achieving important strategic objectives? (How does it move the needle toward better citizen services?) • Solving this issue will improve customer safety, efficiency, employee morale, accountability, and coordination of care. 87
  88. 88. ‘Data Sharing’ 2. Who needs to be involved to make this a success? (list key roles and agencies) • Roles (list) • Executive Staff • Agency Heads • Legal Staff • Agencies (list) • DHS • Attorney General • OPB • Agencies relating to people in general • GBI • DCH • DBHDD 88
  89. 89. ‘Data Sharing’ 3. How will you measure success? (list Primary Customers/Constituents and how they will be Impacted) • The length of time used to gather information in the old system vs. the new system • Successful prosecutions • Time used to close the case • Reduction of duplication of services • Improving coordination across agencies (state and local) 89
  90. 90. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Mobile Workforce’ • Mobile Workforce Opportunity Name: Mobile Workforce Spokesperson: Sonja Allen Smith Agencies DHS DJJ DOA Summary Transitioning the state to a mobile workforce and increasing the accessibility of state programs through the offering of mobile apps. 90
  91. 91. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Mobile Workforce’ 1. How will this idea make a difference in achieving important strategic objectives? (How does it move the needle toward better citizen services?) Increases flexibility and impacts talent acquisition and retention. Improve customer service (JIT). Improve safety. Decrease costs/gain efficiencies. Describe Making a Difference 91
  92. 92. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Mobile Workforce’ 2. Who needs to be involved to make this a success? (list key roles and agencies) Roles (list) CIO and upper management. Agencies (list) Front line workers. 92
  93. 93. Innovation Opportunity Brief: Summary ‘Mobile Workforce’ 3. How will you measure success? (list Primary Customers/Constituents and how they will be Impacted) Measures of Success • Number of individuals accessing the apps/ analyze the traffic on the app • Volume of work completed through the app • Volume of work conducted though the app, outside normal business hours 93
  94. 94. November 18, 2015 (Wed.) 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. GTA Offices: 47 Trinity Ave., Ground Floor GTA hosts GOV Talks: Data Don’t tell me. Show Me. All about data. What to do with it. How to use it. Who can see it. Conference registration via the GTA website. #GaGOVTalks

Editor's Notes

  • Goal 1: Enable all state employees who need to work remotely, when appropriate.
     
    Objective: 1. Execute enterprise-wide contracts for appropriate mobile services by June 20, 2015.
     
    a. Strategy: Work with current mobile services providers to improve existing contracts. Enterprise Mobile Contract in place: Sprint, ATT, Verizon, TMobile: 80,000 subscribers. There are 119,000 mobile devices across state and local government Q3 2015. Quarterly updates with vendor to ensure new tech is available; 4 vendors; ATT, Verizon, Sprint and Tmobile.
     
    b. Strategy: Identify new mobile services needed to augment existing service provider offerings and establish new contracts. Broadband, M2M and additional mobile devices.
     
    c. Strategy: Negotiate convenience contracts for mobile services.: Completed and ongoing.

    Objective 2. Integrate mobile services, infrastructure and policies by March 31, 2017.
     
    Strategy: Define key infrastructure components and services needed to fully support workforce mobility.
    Office365 Contract in place: with 40,000 subscribers providing access to email, Sharepoint, Onedrive and Skype conferencing.

    Strategy: Identify integration points for supporting infrastructure and services.
     
    Strategy: Coordinate standards and develop processes and guidelines for smooth mobile workflow.
     
    Georgia.gov has adopted web based ‘responsive’ apps design standards, guidelines and best practices which eliminates the need for many native mobile apps development. This reduces or eliminates the cost and time of developing native mobile apps.
  • Objective 1. Begin systematically shifting agency service delivery to an online self-service model by June 30, 2015.
     
    Strategy: Establish guidelines to help agencies identify services currently provided primarily through direct interactions that can be provided better, faster or less expensively online.

    Georgia.gov has established standards, guidelines and best practices to assist Georgia agencies enabling efficient Internet based communications via web, mobile and social media. Standards include Drupal publishing platform for web pages design, domain and accessibility standards. Georgia.gov provides training, assistance and tools to track and measure Internet traffic to Georgia websites.

    In 2014, there were 76 million page views and 17 million unique visitors. In 5 months of 2015, were 44 million page views and mobile visitors comprised 43 percent of traffic across the platform

    Strategy: Help agencies find partners among other Georgia agencies for shifting to new service models.

    Georgia.gov contract for web design and support for agencies and Informal support group of social media managers.

    Goal 2. Begin shifting appropriate services to a fully enabled mobile model by June 30, 2016.
     
    Strategy: Identify services with the greatest mobile demand: Georgia.gov provides web analytic tools to determine website traffic and tools to determine mobile access volumes.

    Example: DCSS child support services application with very high mobile traffic is creating a child support app on mobile in 2015. DCSS and Georgia.gov determined 74% of the traffic on child support was from mobile devices.
     
    Strategy: Create guidelines to allow agencies to determine when it is appropriate to shift to fully mobile services.
     
    Strategy: Establish standards for mobilizing appropriate applications that allow agencies to shift service delivery to a mobile model as they deem appropriate. Responsive design standard, guidelines and best practices with technical support from Georgia.gov
     
    Strategy: Move to embrace social media as a way to communicate to our citizens and state workforce. Most agencies have social media presence, with internal social media managers. Georgia.gov; manages facebook and twitter. Which as 4300 facebook likes and 20,000 followers on twitter.
  • Objective 1. Baseline the use of shared services in the state by June 30, 2015.
     
    Strategy: Work with agencies to populate the State Annual Report Register (STARR) system with all of the data needed to baseline the state’s shared services environment during FY 2014 and FY 2015 reporting cycles.

    2014 and 2015 completed.

     b. Strategy: Take the data from the STARR system and develop a baseline.
    Completed a baseline through the SEAC (Strategic Enterprise Applications Council) based on three years of STARR Applications portfolio Data FY 2013-2015)

    Enterprise applications approved: Teamworks/PeopleSoft HR and Financial Management
    Funnel for review and approval: Grants Management, Talent Acquisition, Travel and Expense, Enterprise Data Bus.

    Future: LMS
     
    Objective 2. Facilitate the expansion of the portfolio of market-based enterprise shared services for state agencies by June 30, 2017.
     
    Strategy: Determine marketplace offerings agencies need; move to a model where agencies can try services before buying, and have access to in-place shared services rather than building the service from the ground up.

    Agencies are trying Cloud solutions on a per agency basis before being adopted by the Enterprise such as Learning management either through the exemption process or through the Innovation Program.
     
    b. Strategy: Expand the availability of marketplace vendors offering secure shared services that can be consumed on an as-needed basis and billed monthly.
    Expanding market based portfolio with the inclusion of ‘cloud’ service such as Office365, Azure and Softlayer.
  • Objective 1. Improve the ability to secure and protect state data by June 30, 2015.
     
    Strategy: Establish Data Governance Standards for Georgia and begin encouraging their use in data intensive initiatives.

    Published a Data Life Cycle Management Policy, Data Steward Standard and Data Sharing Standard
     
    Strategy: Create a security verification program for high-impact systems.
    Governor established Cybersecurity Board and review program in 2015

     Strategy: Develop templates for agreements to allow for data sharing among the state agencies.

    Published Data Sharing MOU templates in support of the Data Sharing Standard.
     
    Strategy: Develop streamlined processes for data sharing.

    Enterprise Service Bus; Created a new PSG titled “GM-15-008 Data Sharing Guidelines” which provides guidance on how agencies can agree to share data/information.

    Created a Web Page on GTA’s Portal  Service Web site [http://portal.georgia.gov/] that allows for quick and easy access to Data Sharing Services staff.

    Re-aligned data sharing operations to better support our customers by creating new-solutions and post-production staffing model.


  • Objective 1. Develop governance processes that allow for the adoption of enterprise technology solutions by June 30, 2016.
     
    Strategy: Establish Governance of Enterprise-wide Applications process (GEAP).
    Established the Strategic Enterprise Applications Council to review application candidates for enterprise application.
     
    Objective 2. Analyze and revise the state technology acquisition business model for improvement opportunities by June 30, 2016.
     
    Strategy: Identify additional opportunities for cost reductions, control levers that trigger billing, process improvements that affect agencies’ ability to manage their consumption, and education to help agencies manage their costs. Create an agile funding/cost/procurement model that rewards, encourages and promotes agency joint ventures in the acquisition of technology services.

    GTA revised service sourcing business model to multi sourcing Integrator to increased provider choice and price competition. Enterprise Managed Services Standard to facilitate adoption Of cloud services. Introduced and provided training on storage consumption management program to reduce storage cost.
    Introduced Office365 as a cloud service which allows agencies to reduce per mailbox cost while adding new capabilities. Contracted for Hosted Contact Center as a statewide contract, with 6 vendors for tailored cost effective solutions.
     
    Strategy: Within our current business model, create new funding capabilities to use as seed capital for new technology ventures to cover startup costs and lower barriers for agencies to implement new technology.
     
    c. Strategy: Establish policies, standards and guidelines that enable and promote agencies’ acquiring technology services together.

    EMS standard through PSG process, to establish Full service agency and applications where a new business model for full service agencies can expand offerings into local government, using cloud services to bring in excess capacity to provide to achieve volume and scale. PSGs can be used to create cloud services to unique government market segments. Rules may vary based on the segment; full service GETS, non gets, local, non state customer. Services could reduce overall rates/cost if achieve greater scale.
  • The Georgia IT Strategy Cycle yields innovation opportunities by brining together business and technology leaders with similar business needs. The core ideas are identified by an analysis of all agency strategic plans, assembling a probabilistic view of what is needed across agencies, verifying that thorough a leadership survey, and then refining the opportunities in facilitated sessions.

    The initiatives identified in this way are well-aligned to the issues faced by agencies, but are already known widely, and often solutions have been attempted in the past. Expertise can be the enemy of innovation when trying to break out of past solution approaches.

    RESULTS: Also, for the fourth consecutive year, the Georgia Technology Authority encouraged state and local agencies and other government entities to submit IT projects for recognition in the Technology Innovation Showcase. Entries are due in March for work completed by the end of the previous year (Dec, 2014).

    Last year on of these submissions won the 2014 NASCIO best practice award for Enterprise IT Management. GeorgiaVIEW Brightspace ─ Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia: It provides a central location for students at 28 of the USG’s public, higher-education institutions to access all of their courses and associated educational materials
  • Crowd sourcing allows us to engage a large number of people to suggest new ways for agencies provide services to citizens, and to help review opportunities that have been suggested by others. This should allow a relatively short cycle in finding good ideas for new approaches for providing services.

    Who will we engage for this?
    Agency thought leaders and people familiar with what is needed to serve citizens
    Experts on functional areas of interest (health, safety, education, financial, environmental, technical, political) as needed for a specific campaign
    State leaders with an enterprise view

    What are the success factors?
    Vocal championship of influential leaders at all engaged agencies
    Support of managers throughout agencies (to encourage participation of key staff)
    Communication of participation opportunity to target community (advertising)
    Acknowledgement of participation
    Reward for good ideas
  • Need to create the voice track…

    Centralized IT sets the strategy, governance and overall business management operations
    Customers engage with the Service Portal layer to subscribe to legacy and new market-driven services
    The Service Component layer is anchored by standard service management processes enabling cross-service component coordination as needed
    Not all service components require full integration with the Service Management layer (e.g. quality of self-contained market services are enforced by SLAs & the market whereas Towers by SLAs, OLAs. If the Utility or Cost of a market service is inadequate it is swapped out)
    New Cloud / Micro Services are introduced before / as Towers retire

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