http://slidesha.re/jtstoolkitMaking Torah Relevant to Gen Next:     You’re the App for That    A Resource Toolkit for Part...
Table of ContentsI.     Social Media OverviewII.    Best PracticesIII.   TwitterIV.    FacebookV.     Other toolsVI.    Ar...
Navigation tip: Anytime you see hyperlinksin this presentation, just click  on them to navigate to thereferenced website o...
Social Media Overview• As the 2010 film “The Social Network” implies,  Facebook is a social network. Social networking  is...
Best Practices for RabbisDarim Online – promoting best practices of social media for Jewishorganizations (“Jew Point 0” – ...
HCN ResourcesThe Herring Consulting Network • Social media guidelines  has compiled several social     for synagoguesmedia...
www.hayimherring.com
How to Become an “Expert”It’s more important to be consistently present on one channel thanoccasional on several.Remember ...
What’s a Twitter?Is it a social network, content distributionplatform, or both (a good discussion)?How to use Twitter (ste...
www.twitter.comWhat’s a Twitter?
Twitter Profile
Example of a Tweet         Mention@Reply         Hashtag
To Protect or Not Protect?
Twitter Profiles to FollowJTS Voice (@JTSVoice)JTS Chancellor Arnold Eisen (@ArnoldEisen)Rabbinical Assembly (@RabbiAss...
Isn’t Facebook Just for Kids?Nonprofits, among others, are unlocking the potential ofFacebook to enhance their missionHow ...
Facebook Pages to “Like”JTS PageRabbinical Assembly PageHerring Consulting Network PageConservative Rabbis Facebook Gr...
Other Useful Websites/ToolsHootsuite – Social media dashboard tool (manage your Facebook,Twitter and other accounts from o...
Reading AssignmentBeth Kanter article on arts org’s use of social mediaNYT article on Museums and social media – how do yo...
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JTS Continuing Rabbinic Education Track Participant Toolkit

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Copyright 2012, HCN - Herring Consulting Network. All rights Reserved.

This is a toolkit and resource list for participants in the Jewish Theological Seminary's Continuing Rabbinic Education Track at the 2012 Rabbinical Assembly Convention.

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  • @afstein Adam I see the problem you're having. Just press the expand button on the bottom right-hand corner to make the presentation fullscreen and you will be able to click on the links.

    This just has to do with where those two links on the Reading Assignment page are placed (all the way on the left margin, which is also where the cursor turns into a lefthand arrow for navigating to the previous slide).
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  • Same problem as before seems to be happening, the hyperlinks for Own and the next one can’t be clicked because the cursor turns into a left hand arrow instead.
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  • the links are now working...there was an issue with links in the SmartArt Graphics.
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  • Before you break up into your peer-led groups to talk about how you want to rework your Shavuot text for a younger audience using social media, we wanted to review some of the resources and best practices from the social media toolkit that we sent out before convention. This toolkit is also available online at the link above so you can access it during the small group session. Recognizing that some of you may have more advanced knowledge of social media tools than others, I want to focus more on the best practices for rabbis and synagogues than the “how-to,” which you can learn on your own from the links in this toolkit (or ask any millennial that you know).
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  • So how many people saw the movie “The Social Network?” I thought it was interesting that that title was chosen, as it accurately reflects what Facebook is: a platform of overlapping networks which may or may not be translated in the offline world. Contrast that with Twitter, which is really more of a content distribution platform, or a way to get instantaneous updates from organizations, brands and people that you care about. People often conflate the two with each other, which is really a mistake. Because the better you understand the nature of each platform, the more effective you will be in using them to meet your goals and engage your audience.
  • Darim Online is a great resources for Jewish organizations, and it was Lisa Colton, the Director of Darim, that shared the icebreaker activity with me. There are also a few sites that we recommend because of their thought-leadership in how nonprofit organizations can best leverage social media. Add them on Twitter, subscribe to their RSS feeds, email newsletters and more to further your expertise. Are there any resources that you like that are not on this list?
  • Some of you have already accessed these resources. We designed them with synagogues in mind, so we highly recommend downloading them. Screenshot on next slide…
  • With the proliferation of social media in the last 5 years or so, there has also been a parallel proliferation of self-proclaimed social media “experts.” I’ve participated in dozens of webinars and courses on social media marketing, and while there are many knowledgeable people to learn from, these tools are so new and dynamic that learning how to use them effectively is really more of an art than a science. So, if you’re feeling timid that there’s too much to learn and you just don’t have time to learn it all, don’t worry, because nobody knows it all. These are some things to keep in mind while you’re engaging in these networks. [GO THROUGH LIST]I would also just emphasize that authenticity is key, particularly if you’re trying to reach younger people. I would also add that you will want to enlist the help of others in your synagogue (staff and/or lay leaders) to manage your social media presence. Trying to do it all alone can be daunting. What are some other expert tips that you would add to this list?
  • Hashtags – very important for finding out who else is tweeting about topics that you’re interested in and sifting through the millions of conversations taking place at one time in the Twitterverse. Anyone know what the #1 hashtag was in 2011? (#Egypt)@replies and mentions – really the same thing, but an @reply is when you post a tweet by clicking “reply” on someone else’s tweet. This allows you to post a tweet with that person’s @username the first thing in the tweet. Mentions are when an @username appears anywhere in the body of the tweet. It’s a way to give someone a shoutout in your tweet, such as a colleague, organization or whoever else you want to see your tweet. These are not to be confused with a direct message, which is seen only by the person (not on your twitter feed). Retweeting is like forwarding someone else’s tweet to all of your followers, expanding that person’s reach.Followers – more does not necessarily mean better. Rather, you want followers who are genuinely interested in what you’re tweeting. Getting the right followers is accomplished by first following people that you are most interested in engaging on Twitter or following their tweets. Also, using hashtags, mentions and retweets can help increase your followers. Let’s take a look at what all these components of a tweet look like…
  • Hashtags – very important for finding out who else is tweeting about topics that you’re interested in and sifting through the millions of conversations taking place at one time in the Twitterverse. Anyone know what the #1 hashtag was in 2011? (#Egypt)@replies and mentions – really the same thing, but an @reply is when you post a tweet by clicking “reply” on someone else’s tweet. This allows you to post a tweet with that person’s @username the first thing in the tweet. Mentions are when an @username appears anywhere in the body of the tweet. It’s a way to give someone a shoutout in your tweet, such as a colleague, organization or whoever else you want to see your tweet. These are not to be confused with a direct message, which is seen only by the person (not on your twitter feed). Retweeting is like forwarding someone else’s tweet to all of your followers, expanding that person’s reach.Followers – more does not necessarily mean better. Rather, you want followers who are genuinely interested in what you’re tweeting. Getting the right followers is accomplished by first following people that you are most interested in engaging on Twitter or following their tweets. Also, using hashtags, mentions and retweets can help increase your followers.
  • Checking this box (in “settings”) makes sure that only those who you approve will become your followers. You may wish to do this to avoid spam followers (but then your tweets won’t show up publicly), so you’ll want to weigh the pros and cons in choosing whether to protect your tweets.
  • Here are some profiles you might want to start following for the conference. We’ll be tweeting “officially” from the JTSVoice profile, so make sure to mention @JTSVoice in your tweets and use hashtag #JTSRabbis!
  • Questions for participants:Do you use your Facebook page to reach out to congregants or does your synagogue have its own Facebook page? What are the pros and cons of doing outreach and engagement through your own personal Facebook profile vs. a synagogue page?How might Facebook be leveraged to teach Torah to millennials?Regarding the new Facebook Timeline feature, Rebecca Saidlower and Miriam Brosseau of the Jewish Education Project write that:“It’s about new tools and technologies, yes, but it’s also about affirming your voice, vision, and values as an organization [or rabbi, I would add]. Building the timeline could be a great excuse to bring together staff, new and seasoned alike, to explore the history of the organization.”
  • Here are some of our favorite productivity tools to complement your social media efforts…what are some other sites that you like for their utility in helping you leverage social media for teaching Torah to a broader audience?
  • We highly recommend reading these articles as you think more critically about your social media efforts. Remember, authenticity, listening, and openness are critical to having an effective presence on social networking sites.
  • JTS Continuing Rabbinic Education Track Participant Toolkit

    1. 1. http://slidesha.re/jtstoolkitMaking Torah Relevant to Gen Next: You’re the App for That A Resource Toolkit for Participants March 6-9, 2012 Copyright 2012. HCN-Herring Consulting Network. All Rights Reserved.
    2. 2. Table of ContentsI. Social Media OverviewII. Best PracticesIII. TwitterIV. FacebookV. Other toolsVI. Articles for further study
    3. 3. Navigation tip: Anytime you see hyperlinksin this presentation, just click on them to navigate to thereferenced website or article.
    4. 4. Social Media Overview• As the 2010 film “The Social Network” implies, Facebook is a social network. Social networking is an act of engagement.• Social media is a type of media (like TV, newspapers, and radio); it is a channel for transmitting information/content.• For further reading on this topic, see this article.
    5. 5. Best Practices for RabbisDarim Online – promoting best practices of social media for Jewishorganizations (“Jew Point 0” – Darim blog)Beth Kanter – great resource for non-profit organizations’ use of social media.Subscribe to her weekly blog posts or read her “Best of Beth” posts.WeAreMedia – Social Media “wiki” for nonprofits from the NonprofitTechnology Network.Mashable – many great how-to tutorials and articles on social media for abroad audience.Talance – website best practices tips and web design services with expertisefor synagogues.
    6. 6. HCN ResourcesThe Herring Consulting Network • Social media guidelines has compiled several social for synagoguesmedia resources for synagogues. • Social media strategy forPlease visit the HCN website or non-profits email Preston at • Social media glossary preston@herringconsultingnetwork.com
    7. 7. www.hayimherring.com
    8. 8. How to Become an “Expert”It’s more important to be consistently present on one channel thanoccasional on several.Remember that social media are tools to help you reach your goals,not goals themselves.Don’t forget the social component of social media(comment/like/follow/retweet thoughtfully).Consider whether your organization should develop social mediaguidelines/policy (see HCN Resources).Some trial and error will be required to succeed. And finally…practice, practice, practice!
    9. 9. What’s a Twitter?Is it a social network, content distributionplatform, or both (a good discussion)?How to use Twitter (step-by-step video)What’s a “hashtag” and how do I use it?What are “followers” and what do I need to doabout them?What are @Replies and Mentions and how doI use them?
    10. 10. www.twitter.comWhat’s a Twitter?
    11. 11. Twitter Profile
    12. 12. Example of a Tweet Mention@Reply Hashtag
    13. 13. To Protect or Not Protect?
    14. 14. Twitter Profiles to FollowJTS Voice (@JTSVoice)JTS Chancellor Arnold Eisen (@ArnoldEisen)Rabbinical Assembly (@RabbiAssembly)Rabbi Hayim Herring (@hayimherring) Start tweeting in preparation for the JTS Continuing Rabbinic Education Track!
    15. 15. Isn’t Facebook Just for Kids?Nonprofits, among others, are unlocking the potential ofFacebook to enhance their missionHow to use Facebook (Facebook Help)Join the JTS Rabbinical Track Facebook Group (only participantsin the program will be allowed to join this group and see posts)How can organizations use the new Facebook Timeline?
    16. 16. Facebook Pages to “Like”JTS PageRabbinical Assembly PageHerring Consulting Network PageConservative Rabbis Facebook Group (private) Do you have a Facebook Page for your synagogue and yourself?
    17. 17. Other Useful Websites/ToolsHootsuite – Social media dashboard tool (manage your Facebook,Twitter and other accounts from one site and schedule posts)LinkedIn – professional social networking (manage your personalonline “brand”)GroupSpaces – good for closed group collaboration, membership, etcPrezi – for thinking outside the PowerPointPoll Daddy – online survey and polling tool
    18. 18. Reading AssignmentBeth Kanter article on arts org’s use of social mediaNYT article on Museums and social media – how do you share arcane/esoteric“content” with a more digitally-savvy audience?Generation Flux article by Fast Company (a great read on millennials)Michael Rosenzweig article on cultural institutions and instabilityeJewish Philanthropy article on what makes millennials tick (by a millennial!)Talance blog article on embracing generational diversity in organizationsArticle by Rabbi Owen Gottlieb on the need for new Jewish digital narrative contentBlog post on how one national charity positioned its Facebook page to be a virtualgathering place for people with a common interestRecipients of New Jewish Media Innovation Fund

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